Search Results: the-fate-of-wonder

The Fate of Wonder

Wittgenstein's Critique of Metaphysics and Modernity

Author: Kevin M. Cahill

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231528116

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 3807

Kevin M. Cahill reclaims one of Ludwig Wittgenstein's most passionately pursued endeavors: to reawaken a sense of wonder around human life and language and its mysterious place in the world. Following the philosopher's spiritual and cultural criticism and tying it more tightly to the overall evolution of his thought, Cahill frames an original interpretation of Wittgenstein's engagement with Western metaphysics and modernity, better contextualizing the force of his work. Cahill synthesizes several approaches to Wittgenstein's life and thought. He stresses the nontheoretical aspirations of the philosopher's early and later writings, combining key elements from the so-called resolute readings of the Tractatus with the "therapeutic" readings of Philosophical Investigations. Cahill shows how continuity in Wittgenstein's cultural and spiritual concerns informed if not guided his work between these texts, and in his reading of the Tractatus, Cahill identifies surprising affinities with Martin Heidegger's Being and Time—a text rarely associated with Wittgenstein's early formulations. In his effort to recapture wonder, Wittgenstein both avoided and undermined traditional philosophy's reliance on theory. As Cahill relates the steps of this bold endeavor, he forms his own innovative, analytical methods, joining historicist and contextualist approaches to text-based, immanent readings. The result is an original, sustained examination of Wittgenstein's thought.

The Fate of the Dead in Early Third Century North African Christianity

The Passion of Perpetua and Felicitas and Tertullian

Author: Eliezer Gonzalez

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161529443

Category: Religion

Page: 265

View: 5170

The ideology and imagery in the Passion of Perpetua are mediated heavily by traditional Graeco-Roman culture; in particular, by traditional notions of the afterlife and of the ascent of the soul. This context for understanding the Passion of Perpetua aligns well with the available material evidence, and with the writings of Tertullian, with whose ideology the text of Perpetua is in an implicit polemical dialogue.Eliezer Gonzalez analyzes how the Passion of Perpetua provides us with early literary evidence of an environment in which the Graeco-Roman and Christian cults of the dead, including the cults of the martyrs and saints, appear to be very much aligned. He also shows that the text of the Passion of Perpetua and the writings of Tertullian provide insights into an early stage in the polemic between these two conceptualisations of the afterlife of the righteous.

Arts of Wonder

Enchanting Secularity - Walter De Maria, Diller + Scofidio, James Turrell, Andy Goldsworthy

Author: Jeffrey L. Kosky

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226451089

Category: Religion

Page: 248

View: 6228

“The fate of our times is characterized by rationalization and intellectualization and, above all, by ‘the disenchantment of the world.’” Max Weber’s statement remains a dominant interpretation of the modern condition: the increasing capabilities of knowledge and science have banished mysteries, leaving a world that can be mastered technically and intellectually. And though this idea seems empowering, many people have become disenchanted with modern disenchantment. Using intimate encounters with works of art to explore disenchantment and the possibilities of re-enchantment, Arts of Wonder addresses questions about the nature of humanity, the world, and God in the wake of Weber’s diagnosis of modernity. Jeffrey L. Kosky focuses on a handful of artists—Walter De Maria, Diller + Scofidio, James Turrell, and Andy Goldsworthy—to show how they introduce spaces hospitable to mystery and wonder, redemption and revelation, and transcendence and creation. What might be thought of as religious longings, he argues, are crucial aspects of enchanting secularity when developed through encounters with these works of art. Developing a model of religion that might be significant to secular culture, Kosky shows how this model can be employed to deepen interpretation of the art we usually view as representing secular modernity. A thoughtful dialogue between philosophy and art, Arts of Wonder will catch the eye of readers of art and religion, philosophy of religion, and art criticism.

Seven Wonders - Das Grabmal der Schatten

Author: Peter Lerangis

Publisher: cbj Verlag

ISBN: 3641160286

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 352

View: 9449

Sieben Weltwunder – die tödliche Jagd geht weiter Jack, Cass, Marco und Aly sind die Auserwählten: nur diese vier Freunde mit ihren Superkräften können die sieben magischen Gefäße finden, die einst in den sieben Weltwundern der Antike versteckt wurden. Wenn die Mission misslingt, ist die Menschheit in Gefahr! Jack McKinley und seine Freunde haben tödliche Gegner besiegt und uralte Schätze gehoben – doch einer der Ihren hat sie betrogen. Verloren in den Ruinen von Babylon, von ihrem Freund Marco verlassen, wissen die Auserwählten nicht mehr, wem sie noch trauen können. Ihr Leben steht auf dem Spiel, als die Freunde zum Mausoleum von Halikarnassos aufbrechen. Ein tödlicher Kampf mit einem Heer der Untoten beginnt.

Shakespeare and the Theatre of Wonder

Author: T. G. Bishop

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521550864

Category: Drama

Page: 222

View: 1713

This study examines ways in which wonder has been used by classical and medieval playwrights, and by Shakespeare.

Abraham Joshua Heschel and the Sources of Wonder

Author: Michael Marmur

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442651237

Category: Philosophy

Page: 279

View: 7218

Abraham Joshua Heschel and the Sources of Wonder is the first book to demonstrate how Heschel's political, intellectual, and spiritual commitments were embedded in his reading of Jewish tradition.

The Fate of Favourites, Exemplified in the Fall of Villiers, Duke of Buckingham (Prime Minister to Their Majesties King James and King Charles I) who was Stabbed by Felton, August 23, 1628

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 112

View: 6800

The Stone of Sorrow

The Revealer of Wonders

Author: John Ward

Publisher: Robert Davies Multimedia

ISBN: 9781552070802

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 256

View: 2977

Six months after their first adventure, teenagers Jake and Helen reunite to discover the history and location of an ancient machine and a powerful crystal, whose powers were harnessed centuries ago by powerful alchemists seeking eternal life.

Wonder and Exile in the New World

Author: Alex Nava

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271069864

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 5002

In Wonder and Exile in the New World, Alex Nava explores the border regions between wonder and exile, particularly in relation to the New World. It traces the preoccupation with the concept of wonder in the history of the Americas, beginning with the first European encounters, goes on to investigate later representations in the Baroque age, and ultimately enters the twentieth century with the emergence of so-called magical realism. In telling the story of wonder in the New World, Nava gives special attention to the part it played in the history of violence and exile, either as a force that supported and reinforced the Conquest or as a voice of resistance and decolonization. Focusing on the work of New World explorers, writers, and poets—and their literary descendants—Nava finds that wonder and exile have been two of the most significant metaphors within Latin American cultural, literary, and religious representations. Beginning with the period of the Conquest, especially with Cabeza de Vaca and Las Casas, continuing through the Baroque with Cervantes and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and moving into the twentieth century with Alejo Carpentier and Miguel Ángel Asturias, Nava produces a historical study of Latin American narrative in which religious and theological perspectives figure prominently.

The Secret History of Wonder Woman

Author: Jill Lepore

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385354053

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 9940

A riveting work of historical detection revealing that the origin of one of the world’s most iconic superheroes hides within it a fascinating family story—and a crucial history of twentieth-century feminism Wonder Woman, created in 1941, is the most popular female superhero of all time. Aside from Superman and Batman, no superhero has lasted as long or commanded so vast and wildly passionate a following. Like every other superhero, Wonder Woman has a secret identity. Unlike every other superhero, she has also has a secret history. Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore has uncovered an astonishing trove of documents, including the never-before-seen private papers of William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman’s creator. Beginning in his undergraduate years at Harvard, Marston was influenced by early suffragists and feminists, starting with Emmeline Pankhurst, who was banned from speaking on campus in 1911, when Marston was a freshman. In the 1920s, Marston and his wife, Sadie Elizabeth Holloway, brought into their home Olive Byrne, the niece of Margaret Sanger, one of the most influential feminists of the twentieth century. The Marston family story is a tale of drama, intrigue, and irony. In the 1930s, Marston and Byrne wrote a regular column for Family Circle celebrating conventional family life, even as they themselves pursued lives of extraordinary nonconformity. Marston, internationally known as an expert on truth—he invented the lie detector test—lived a life of secrets, only to spill them on the pages of Wonder Woman. The Secret History of Wonder Woman is a tour de force of intellectual and cultural history. Wonder Woman, Lepore argues, is the missing link in the history of the struggle for women’s rights—a chain of events that begins with the women’s suffrage campaigns of the early 1900s and ends with the troubled place of feminism a century later.

The Wonder of Their Voices

The 1946 Holocaust Interviews of David Boder

Author: Alan Rosen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199889562

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4870

Over the last several decades, video testimony with aging Holocaust survivors has brought these witnesses into the limelight. Yet the success of these projects has made it seem that little survivor testimony took place in earlier years. In truth, thousands of survivors began to recount their experience at the earliest opportunity. This book provides the first full-length case study of early postwar Holocaust testimony, focusing on David Boder's 1946 displaced persons interview project. In July 1946, Boder, a psychologist, traveled to Europe to interview victims of the Holocaust who were in the Displaced Persons (DP) camps and what he called "shelter houses." During his nine weeks in Europe, Boder carried out approximately 130 interviews in nine languages and recorded them on a wire recorder. Likely the earliest audio recorded testimony of Holocaust survivors, the interviews are valuable today for the spoken word (that of the DP narrators and of Boder himself) and also for the song sessions and religious services that Boder recorded. Eighty sessions were eventually transcribed into English, most of which were included in a self-published manuscript. Alan Rosen sets Boder's project in the context of the postwar response to displaced persons, sketches the dramatic background of his previous life and work, chronicles in detail the evolving process of interviewing both Jewish and non-Jewish DPs, and examines from several angles the implications for the history of Holocaust testimony. Such early postwar testimony, Rosen avers, deserves to be taken on its own terms rather than to be enfolded into earlier or later schemas of testimony. Moreover, Boder's efforts and the support he was given for them demonstrate that American postwar response to the Holocaust was not universally indifferent but rather often engaged, concerned, and resourceful.

The fate: a tale of stirring times

Author: George Payne Rainsford James

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English fiction

Page: 127

View: 6541

The Fate of Thomas P Kanne (Storycuts)

Author: Brian Jacques

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448120128

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 22

View: 4981

Thomas P Kanne is the Phantom Snake, an elusive graffiti artist who has made many enemies in his attempts to vandalise his home city of Middlechester. Mr Bausin, the caretaker of the local museum is a seemingly harmless old man with a dark secret, but more importantly, a vendetta against the Phantom Snake. When Mr Bausin finally gets to confront his nemesis in the dark, abandoned corridors of the Egyptian exhibit, Thomas faces a terrifying game of cat and mouse. Part of the Storycuts series, this short story was previously published in the collection Seven Strange and Ghostly Tales.

The Fate of the Mammoth

Fossils, Myth, and History

Author: Claudine Cohen

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226112923

Category: Nature

Page: 297

View: 6156

Reveals new information about the mammoth elephant, and about the science that grew up around its discovery.

God of Wonders

A Daily Devotional

Author: David A. Steen

Publisher: Review and Herald Pub Assoc

ISBN: 0828025118

Category: Religion

Page: 373

View: 5981

Explore the wonders of God's creation with biologist David A. Steen, and discover the intricacies of things we usually take for granted: taste, gravity, skin, bacteria, trees, DNA, stars, cellular reproduction, and many more. Are you ready to experience an overwhelming sense of awe? God's creative genius is simply breathtaking.

The Fate of Place

A Philosophical History

Author: Edward Casey

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520954564

Category: Philosophy

Page: 512

View: 5228

In this imaginative and comprehensive study, Edward Casey, one of the most incisive interpreters of the Continental philosophical tradition, offers a philosophical history of the evolving conceptualizations of place and space in Western thought. Not merely a presentation of the ideas of other philosophers, The Fate of Place is acutely sensitive to silences, absences, and missed opportunities in the complex history of philosophical approaches to space and place. A central theme is the increasing neglect of place in favor of space from the seventh century A.D. onward, amounting to the virtual exclusion of place by the end of the eighteenth century. Casey begins with mythological and religious creation stories and the theories of Plato and Aristotle and then explores the heritage of Neoplatonic, medieval, and Renaissance speculations about space. He presents an impressive history of the birth of modern spatial conceptions in the writings of Newton, Descartes, Leibniz, and Kant and delineates the evolution of twentieth-century phenomenological approaches in the work of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Bachelard, and Heidegger. In the book's final section, Casey explores the postmodern theories of Foucault, Derrida, Tschumi, Deleuze and Guattari, and Irigaray.

The Fate of America

An Inquiry Into National Character

Author: Michael Gellert

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1612342213

Category: Comparative civilization

Page: 366

View: 4742

The Fate of America examines the national character of the United States against the backdrop of its history, popular culture, and media. Michael Gellert suggests that the deterioration of AmericaOCOs OC heroic ideal, OCO the heart of its national character, is responsible for the countryOCOs deepening social ills and the erosion of its vital institutions. He calls for a spiritual and intellectual renaissance and a renewed sense of national purpose in order to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century."

The Fate of the Southern Cross

Author: Ronnie A. Fenn

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 1452024480

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 188

View: 2398

The book tells of a life under 3 flags and the blood, sweat and tears to live under all 3.

The Ocean of Life

The Fate of Man and the Sea

Author: Callum Roberts

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101583568

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 4110

A Silent Spring for oceans, written by "the Rachel Carson of the fish world" (The New York Times) Who can forget the sense of wonder with which they discovered the creatures of the deep? In this vibrant hymn to the sea, Callum Roberts—one of the world’s foremost conservation biologists—leads readers on a fascinating tour of mankind’s relationship to the sea, from the earliest traces of water on earth to the oceans as we know them today. In the process, Roberts looks at how the taming of the oceans has shaped human civilization and affected marine life. We have always been fish eaters, from the dawn of civilization, but in the last twenty years we have transformed the oceans beyond recognition. Putting our exploitation of the seas into historical context, Roberts offers a devastating account of the impact of modern fishing techniques, pollution, and climate change, and reveals what it would take to steer the right course while there is still time. Like Four Fish and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, The Ocean of Life takes a long view to tell a story in which each one of us has a role to play.

Poetry and the Fate of the Senses

Author: Susan Stewart

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226774145

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 447

View: 4442

What is the role of the senses in the creation and reception of poetry? How does poetry carry on the long tradition of making experience and suffering understood by others? With Poetry and the Fate of the Senses, Susan Stewart traces the path of the aesthetic in search of an explanation for the role of poetry in our culture. The task of poetry, she tells us, is to counter the loneliness of the mind, or to help it glean, out of the darkness of solitude, the outline of others. Poetry, she contends, makes tangible, visible, and audible the contours of our shared humanity. It sustains and transforms the threshold between individual and social existence. Herself an acclaimed poet, Stewart not only brings the intelligence of a critic to the question of poetry, but the insight of a practitioner as well. Her new study draws on reading from the ancient Greeks to the postmoderns to explain how poetry creates meanings between persons. Poetry and the Fate of the Senses includes close discussions of poems by Stevens, Hopkins, Keats, Hardy, Bishop, and Traherne, of the sense of vertigo in Baroque and Romantic works, and of the rich tradition of nocturnes in visual, musical, and verbal art. Ultimately, Stewart explores the pivotal role of poetry in contemporary culture. She argues that poetry can counter the denigration of the senses and can expand our imagination of the range of human expression. Poetry and the Fate of the Senses won the 2004 Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism in Memory of Newton Arvin, administered for the Truman Capote Estate by the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. It also won the Phi Beta Kappa Society's 2002 Christian Gauss Award for Literary Criticism.

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