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The Internationalists

How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World

Author: Oona A. Hathaway

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 388

“An original book…about individuals who used ideas to change the world” (The New Yorker)—the fascinating exploration into the creation and history of the Paris Peace Pact, an often overlooked but transformative treaty that laid the foundation for the international system we live under today. In 1928, the leaders of the world assembled in Paris to outlaw war. Within the year, the treaty signed that day, known as the Peace Pact, had been ratified by nearly every state in the world. War, for the first time in history, had become illegal. But within a decade of its signing, each state that had gathered in Paris to renounce war was at war. And in the century that followed, the Peace Pact was dismissed as an act of folly and an unmistakable failure. This book argues that the Peace Pact ushered in a sustained march toward peace that lasts to this day. A “thought-provoking and comprehensively researched book” (The Wall Street Journal), The Internationalists tells the story of the Peace Pact through a fascinating and diverse array of lawyers, politicians, and intellectuals. It reveals the centuries-long struggle of ideas over the role of war in a just world order. It details the brutal world of conflict the Peace Pact helped extinguish, and the subsequent era where tariffs and sanctions take the place of tanks and gunships. The Internationalists is “indispensable” (The Washington Post). Accessible and gripping, this book will change the way we view the history of the twentieth century—and how we must work together to protect the global order the internationalists fought to make possible. “A fascinating and challenging book, which raises gravely important issues for the present…Given the state of the world, The Internationalists has come along at the right moment” (The Financial Times).

The Internationalists

Masters of the Global Game

Author: Catherine W. Scherer

Publisher: Business Expert Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 125

View: 715

This book identifies the six key practices of successful internationalists and posits that recognizing them will have a profound effect on corporate mindset and how global companies plan and execute cross-border strategies.

The Internationalists: Globalization, the Age of Information and the Developing World Ascent

Author: Christopher Jannou

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page:

View: 870

Technology and globalization have created unprecedented opportunities for wealth creation whilst unleashing some of the most impressive forces for human advancement the world has ever known. These forces have also triggered what will likely be the last great development push the Modern Age will see. By 2050, the developing world as it is currently defined will be no more; with the exception of a few under-performers, there will only be the developed one. The Internationalists is a sweeping look at the forces shaping this next surge of economic and human development; from an investor who has logged the hard miles to know his subject inside and out.

The Logic of Internationalism

Coercion and Accommodation

Author: Kjell Goldmann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 369

Internationalism is the view that institution-building and peaceful cooperation will make peace and security prevail in a system of independent states. This book examines this controversial topic and discusses whether such a view is realistic or whether international relations are typically characterised by tension and war. Kjell Goldmann seeks to examine the plausibility of internationalism under present-day conditions. A theory of internationalism is outlined and is shown to have two dimensions: one coercive (to enforce the rules and decisions of international institutions) and one accommodative (to avoid confrontation by means of mutual understanding and compromise). Problematic features of the theory are then considered in detail: the assumption that all international cooperation tends to inhibit war, and the tension inherent in the joint pursuit of coercion and accommodation.

"Constitutions be damned!" say the Internationalists

Author: B. Bruce

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 125

View: 551

The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Re-Made the World, by Oona A. Hathaway and Scott J. Shapiro

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 476

What does it mean to be an internationalist today?

Author: New Internationalist Publications, Limited

Publisher: New Internationalist

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 25

View: 299

A collection of meditations on solidarity and development to mark 40 years of New Internationalist.

Morality and American Foreign Policy

The Role of Ethics in International Affairs

Author: Robert W. McElroy

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 524

Most international relations specialists since World War II have assumed that morality plays only the most peripheral role in the making of substantive foreign policy decisions. To show that moral norms can, and do, significantly affect international affairs, Robert McElroy investigates four cases of American foreign policy-making: U.S. food aid to the Soviet Union during the Russian famine of 1921, Nixon's decision to alter U.S. policies on biochemical weapons production in 1969, the signing of the Panama Canal Treaties in 1978, and the bombing of Dresden during World War II. Originally published in 1992. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Devil We Knew

Americans and the Cold War

Author: H. W. Brands

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 993

In the late 1950s, Washington was driven by its fear of communist subversion: it saw the hand of Kremlin behind developments at home and across the globe. The FBI was obsessed with the threat posed by American communist party--yet party membership had sunk so low, writes H.W. Brands, that it could have fit "inside a high-school gymnasium," and it was so heavily infiltrated that J. Edgar Hoover actually contemplated using his informers as a voting bloc to take over the party. Abroad, the preoccupation with communism drove the White House to help overthrow democratically elected governments in Guatemala and Iran, and replace them with dictatorships. But by then the Cold War had long since blinded Americans to the ironies of their battle against communism. In The Devil We Knew, Brands provides a witty, perceptive history of the American experience of the Cold War, from Truman's creation of the CIA to Ronald Reagan's creation of SDI. Brands has written a number of highly regarded works on America in the twentieth century; here he puts his experience to work in a volume of impeccable scholarship and exceptional verve. He turns a critical eye to the strategic conceptions (and misconceptions) that led a once-isolationist nation to pursue the war against communism to the most remote places on Earth. By the time Eisenhower left office, the United States was fighting communism by backing dictators from Iran to South Vietnam, from Latin America to the Middle East--while engaging in covert operations the world over. Brands offers no apologies for communist behavior, but he deftly illustrates the strained thinking that led Washington to commit gravely disproportionate resources (including tens of thousands of lives in Korea and Vietnam) to questionable causes. He keenly analyzes the changing policies of each administration, from Nixon's juggling (SALT talks with Moscow, new relations with Ccmmunist China, and bombing North Vietnam) to Carter's confusion to Reagan's laserrattling. Equally important is his incisive, often amusing look at how the anti-Soviet struggle was exploited by politicians, industrialists, and government agencies. He weaves in deft sketches of figures like Barry Goldwater and Henry Jackson (who won a Senate seat with the promise, "Many plants will be converting from peace time to all-out defense production"). We see John F. Kennedy deliver an eloquent speech in 1957 defending the rising forces of nationalism in Algeria and Vietnam; we also see him in the White House a few years later, ordering a massive increase in America's troop commitment to Saigon. The book ranges through the economics and psychology of the Cold War, demonstrating how the confrontation created its own constituencies in private industry and public life. In the end, Americans claimed victory in the Cold War, but Brands's account gives us reason to tone down the celebrations. "Most perversely," he writes, "the call to arms against communism caused American leaders to subvert the principles that constituted their country's best argument against communism." This far-reaching history makes clear that the Cold War was simultaneously far more, and far less, than we ever imagined at the time.

Post-War Planning on the Periphery

Author: Thomas C Mills

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 572

This book provides readers with an insight to a previously unexplored aspect of Anglo-American economic diplomacy during the Second World War.

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