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The Invisible Satirist

Juvenal and Second-century Rome

Author: James Uden

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 560

Based on author's dissertation, Columbia Univ., 2011.

Apuleius' Invisible Ass

Encounters with the Unseen in the Metamorphoses

Author: Geoffrey C. Benson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 140

Argues that invisibility is a central motif in Apuleius' Metamorphoses, presenting a new interpretation of this Latin masterpiece.

Juvenal’s Global Awareness

Circulation, Connectivity, and Empire

Author: Osman Umurhan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 190

View: 872

In Juvenal’s Global Awareness Osman Umurhan applies theories of globalization to an investigation of Juvenal’s articulation and understanding of empire, imperialism and identity. Umurhan explains how the increased interconnectivity between different localities, ethnic and political, shapes Juvenal’s view of Rome as in constant flux and motion. Theoretical and sociological notions of deterritorialization, time-space compression and the rhizome inform the satirist’s language of mobility and his construction of space and place within second century Rome and its empire. The circulation of people, goods and ideas generated by processes of globalization facilitates Juvenal’s negotiation of threats and changes to Roman institutions that include a wide array of topics, from representatios of the army and food to discussions of cannibalism and language. Umurhan’s analysis stresses that Juvenalian satire itself is a rhizome in both function and form. This study is designed for audiences interested in Juvenal, empire and globalization under Rome.

Mythologies of Internal Exile in Elizabethan Verse

Six Studies

Author: A.D. Cousins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

View: 887

Writers of the English Renaissance, like their European contemporaries, frequently reflect on the phenomenon of exile—an experience that forces the individual to establish a new personal identity in an alien environment. Although there has been much commentary on this phenomenon as represented in English Renaissance literature, there has been nothing written at length about its counterpart, namely, internal exile: marginalization, or estrangement, within the homeland. This volume considers internal exile as a simultaneously twofold experience. It studies estrangement from one’s society and, correlatively, from one’s normative sense of self. In doing so, it focuses initially on the sonnet sequences by Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare (which is to say, the problematics of romance); then it examines the verse satires of Donne, Hall, and Marston (likewise, the problematics of anti-romance). This book argues that the authors of these major texts create mythologies—via the myths of (and accumulated mythographies about) Cupid, satyrs, and Proteus—through which to reflect on the doubleness of exile within one’s own community. These mythologies, at times accompanied by theologies, of alienation suggest that internal exile is a fluid and complex experience demanding multifarious reinterpretation of the incongruously expatriate self. The monograph thus establishes a new framework for understanding texts at once diverse yet central to the Elizabethan literary achievement.

Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions

Author: Catherine Keane

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 281

In his sixteen verse Satires, Juvenal explores the emotional provocations and pleasures associated with social criticism and mockery. He makes use of traditional generic elements such as the first-person speaker, moral diatribe, narrative, and literary allusion to create this new satiric preoccupation and theme. Juvenal defines the satirist figure as an emotional agent who dramatizes his own response to human vices and faults, and he in turn aims to engage other people's feelings. Over the course of his career, he adopts a series of rhetorical personae that represent a spectrum of satiric emotions, encouraging his audience to ponder satire's proper emotional mode and function. Juvenal first offers his signature indignatio with its associated pleasures and discomforts, then tries on subtler personae that suggest dry detachment, callous amusement, anxiety, and other affective states. As Keane shows, the satiric emotions are not only found in the author's rhetorical performances, but they are also a major part of the human farrago that the Satires purport to treat. Juvenal's poems explore the dynamic operation of emotions in society, drawing on diverse ancient literary, rhetorical, and philosophical sources. Each poem uniquely engages with different texts and ideas to reveal the unsettling powers of its emotional mode. Keane also analyzes the "emotional plot" of each book of Satires and the structural logic of the entire series with its wide range of subjects and settings. From his famous angry tirades to his more puzzling later meditations, Juvenal demonstrates an enduring interest in the relationship between feelings and moral judgment.

Pen Pictures of Europe

Author: Elizabeth Peake

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Europe

Page: 599

View: 558

W.M. Thackeray, satirist and humorist. Cut from Dublin University magazine, Nov. 1859 and Jan. 1860. [46].

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 696

Studies in English and American Literature and Language

In Memory of Jerzy Strzetelski

Author: Jerzy Strzetelski

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: English philology

Page: 278

View: 843

GREEN PEAS PICKED FROM THE PATCH OF INVISIBLE GREEN ESQ

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 949

Green peas, picked from the patch of Invisible Green esq. [pseud.]

Author: William G. Crippen

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: American wit and humor

Page: 311

View: 474

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