The Journal Of Medieval And Early Modern Studies PDF EPUB Download

The Journal Of Medieval And Early Modern Studies also available in docx and mobi. Read The Journal Of Medieval And Early Modern Studies online, read in mobile or Kindle.

The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic journals

Page:

View: 715

In Laudem Hierosolymitani

Author: Iris Shagrir

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 848

In the last thirty-five years B.Z. Kedar has become a leading historian of the field of the crusades, and of medieval and Middle Eastern history more broadly. This volume presents 31 essays written by eminent medievalists in appreciation of Kedar's talent, method and diversity. The collection relates to the Latin East and to the reciprocity between West and East in the time of the crusades. The individual essays deal with the history, archaeology and art of the Holy Land, the crusades and the military orders, Mediterranean commerce, medieval mentality, and the Jews.

Experiences of Poverty in Late Medieval and Early Modern England and France

Author: Anne M. Scott

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 323

Exploring a range of poverty experiences-socioeconomic, moral and spiritual-this collection presents new research by a distinguished group of scholars working in the medieval and early modern periods. Using new sources - and adopting new approaches to known sources - the authors share insights into the management and the self-management of the poor, and search out aspects of the experience of poverty worthy of note, from which can be traced lasting influences on the continuing understanding and experience of poverty in pre-modern Europe.

Gender, Catholicism and Spirituality

Women and the Roman Catholic Church in Britain and Europe, 1200-1900

Author: Laurence Lux-Sterritt

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 892

This timely collection of essays on British and European Catholic spiritualities explores how ideas of the sacred have influenced female relationships with piety and religious vocations over time. Each of the studies focuses on specific persons or groups within the varied contexts of England, France, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain, together spanning the medieval period through to the nineteenth century. Examining the interplay between women's religious roles and patriarchal norms, the volume highlights the relevance of gender and spirituality through a wide geographical and chronological spectrum. It is an essential resource for students of Gender History, Women's Studies and Religious Studies, introducing a wealth of new research and providing an approachable guide to current debates and methodologies. Contributions by: Nancy Jiwon Cho, Frances E. Dolan, Rina Lahav, Jenna Lay, Laurence Lux-Sterritt, Carmen M. Mangion, Querciolo Mazzonis, Marit Monteiro, Elizabeth Rhodes, Kate Stogdon, Anna Welch

Virtue and the Moral Life

Theological and Philosophical Perspectives

Author: William Werpehowski

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 226

View: 226

Virtue and the Moral Life brings together distinguished philosophers and theologians with younger scholars of consummate promise to produce ten essays that engage both academics and students of ethics. This collection explores the role virtues play in identifying the good life and the good society.

The Culture of Cloth in Early Modern England

Textual Constructions of a National Identity

Author: Dr Roze Hentschell

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 591

Through its exploration of the intersections between the culture of the wool broadcloth industry and the literature of the early modern period, this study contributes to the expanding field of material studies in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. The author argues that it is impossible to comprehend the development of emerging English nationalism during that time period, without considering the culture of the cloth industry. She shows that, reaching far beyond its status as a commodity of production and exchange, that industry was also a locus for organizing sentiments of national solidarity across social and economic divisions. Hentschell looks to textual productions-both imaginative and non-fiction works that often treat the cloth industry with mythic importance-to help explain how cloth came to be a catalyst for nationalism. Each chapter ties a particular mode, such as pastoral, prose romance, travel propaganda, satire, and drama, with a specific issue of the cloth industry, demonstrating the distinct work different literary genres contributed to what the author terms the 'culture of cloth'.

Shakespeare's Demonology

A Dictionary

Author: Marion Gibson

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 198

This volume in the long-running and acclaimed Shakespeare Dictionary series is a detailed, critical reference work examining all aspects of magic, good and evil, across Shakespeare's works. Topics covered include the representation of fairies, witches, ghosts, devils and spirits.

A Place to Believe in

Locating Medieval Landscapes

Author: Clare A. Lees

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 479

Medievalists have much to gain from a thoroughgoing contemplation of place. If landscapes are windows onto human activity, they connect us with medieval people, enabling us to ask questions about their senses of space and place. In A Place to Believe In Clare Lees and Gillian Overing bring together scholars of medieval literature, archaeology, history, religion, art history, and environmental studies to explore the idea of place in medieval religious culture. The essays in A Place to Believe In reveal places real and imagined, ancient and modern: Anglo-Saxon Northumbria (home of Whitby and Bede&’s monastery of Jarrow), Cistercian monasteries of late medieval Britain, pilgrimages of mind and soul in Margery Kempe, the ruins of Coventry Cathedral in 1940, and representations of the sacred landscape in today&’s Pacific Northwest. A strength of the collection is its awareness of the fact that medieval and modern viewpoints converge in an experience of place and frame a newly created space where the literary, the historical, and the cultural are in ongoing negotiation with the geographical, the personal, and the material. Featuring a distinguished array of scholars, A Place to Believe In will be of great interest to scholars across medieval fields interested in the interplay between medieval and modern ideas of place. Contributors are Kenneth Addison, Sarah Beckwith, Stephanie Hollis, Stacy S. Klein, Fred Orton, Ann Marie Rasmussen, Diane Watt, Kelley M. Wickham-Crowley, Ulrike Wiethaus, and Ian Wood.

The Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe

Author: Judith M. Bennett

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 642

View: 918

The Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe provides a comprehensive overview of the gender rules encountered in Europe in the period between approximately 500 and 1500 C.E. The essays collected in this volume speak to interpretative challenges common to all fields of women's and gender history - that is, how best to uncover the experiences of ordinary people from archives formed mainly by and about elite males, and how to combine social histories of lived experiences with cultural histories of gendered discourses and identities. The collection focuses on Western Europe in the Middle Ages but offers some consideration of medieval Islam and Byzantium. The Handbook is structured into seven sections: Christian, Jewish, and Muslim thought; law in theory and practice; domestic life and material culture; labour, land, and economy; bodies and sexualities; gender and holiness; and the interplay of continuity and change throughout the medieval period. It contains material from some of the foremost scholars in this field, and it not only serves as the major reference text in medieval and gender studies, but also provides an agenda for future new research.

Chess in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age

A Fundamental Thought Paradigm of the Premodern World

Author: Daniel E. O'Sullivan

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 263

View: 323

The game of chess was wildly popular in the Middle Ages, so much so that it became an important thought paradigm for thinkers and writers who utilized its vocabulary and imagery for commentaries on war, politics, love, and the social order. In this collection of essays, scholars investigate chess texts from numerous traditions – English, French, German, Latin, Persian, Spanish, Swedish, and Catalan – and argue that knowledge of chess is essential to understanding medieval culture. Such knowledge, however, cannot rely on the modern game, for today’s rules were not developed until the late fifteenth century. Only through familiarity with earlier incarnations of the game can one fully appreciate the full import of chess to medieval society. The careful scholarship contained in this volume provides not only insight into the significance of chess in medieval European culture but also opens up avenues of inquiry for future work in this rich field.

Best Books