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The Lie of the Land

An under-the-field guide to the British Isles

Author: Ian Vince

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 694

Like most of us, Ian Vince used to think of the British countryside as average, unexciting - as dramatic as a nice cup of tea. Then, over the course of a single car journey, the features of our green and pleasant land reawakened a fascination with geology that he had long forgotten, and he began to delve beneath the surface (metaphorically, that is). From the rocks of north-west Scotland which are amongst the oldest on the planet to St Michael's Mount off the coast of Cornwall, which was still being shaped in human memory, The Lie of the Land takes us on a journey through a fantastically exotic Britain of red desert sands, shattering continental collisions and tides of volcanic lava. Ian Vince shows us how Britain came to look the way it does; and with warmth and wit transports us back through billions of years to a land that time forgot.

The Lie of the Land

Author: Paul Carter

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Australia

Page: 421

View: 424

In post-colonial politics, argues the author of this book, we will need to have to hand a different conception of the land and our relationship to it - a philosophy that takes account of the lie of the land. The argument is one which he illuminates not only historically, but poetically.

The Lie of the Land

Author: Utley, Jaspar David

Publisher: University of Namibia Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 202

View: 846

The Lie of the Land is a novel set against the background of the German colonial wars in Namibia in the early 1900s. The central character is an academic in linguistics who occasionally acts as a British agent. He is a cynical, private individual who sees himself as a neutral observer but is eventually forced to take sides when he witnesses the atrocities of the Herero and Nama genocide and, above all, meets a young Nama woman who enchants him. The novel explores the shifting nature of the oppressor and the oppressed. Despite the unfolding tragic events, the story is lightened by surprising bursts of humour, and is ultimately a love story.

The Lie of the Land

Irish Identities

Author: Fintan O'Toole

Publisher: Verso

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 308

A collection of essays focusing on contemporary Irish culture, discussing nationalism, sexual politics, the Church, and Ireland's place in a global economy

The Lie of the land

English literary studies in India

Author: Rajeswari Sunder Rajan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 308

View: 685

English literature is studied, at some stage or the other, by almost every middle- and upper-class person in India. Its importance as a discipline, or as a body of texts, that shapes the minds, attitudes, behaviour and social aspirations of India's educated urban elites - who occupy powerful positions in government, business and industry - is often fundamental and certainly undoubted. Yet some of the most basic questions about English literary studies in India - such as their relevance and validity, their social functions, their institutional contexts, their pedagogic and publishing practices - are never posed. This volume, taken as a whole, breaks the long silence and asks why. It comprises seventeen essays, fourteen of which are by women academics. Collectively, they seek to show up the sorts of conservative orthodoxies, bureaucratic power structures, fossilized thought processes, unacademic institutions, colonial worldviews, outdated theoretical frameworks, gross cultural premises and crassly commercialized situations which frequently define what it means to study and teach English literature in India. The essays appear in eight sections; the first has two pieces which situate English within British and post-Independence India; the second has an essay on teaching English in the colonial context; the third has one on teaching it today. The fourth section focuses on three widely-prescribed English literary texts and analyses Indian classroom responses to these. The fifth section examines ideological and business contexts: an essay on publishing outlines the markets for anthologies, textbooks and monographs; another essay provides a critique of England's mediations in India via theBritish Council. The sixth section looks at the broad types of students and teachers that exist in university departments of English, as well as at the attitudes, aspirations and academic situations that commonly prevail. The seventh section has a piece on the sorts of intellectual resistance that dominate Indian academia, specifically the resistance to those new and changing parameters of thinking about English literature which question both the sacred canon of Eng. Lit. and the professorial guardians of that canon. The final section has essays on the position of English in a post-colonial society, and on the desirability of using linguistic tools to penetrate the paradigms of literary criticism. An annexure on landmarks in Indian education policy serves as conclusion. The contributors to this volume are all Indian academics who have taught English in the country's major universities, and some of whom are now highly - reputed expatriate professors of English in the West. Their book is a pioneering attempt to situate, define, analyse, historicize, destabilize and problematize the study of English in India. This volume will seem invaluable to teachers and students of sociology, history, colonialism and culture, and to all who teach or study English literature anywhere in the world.

The Lie of the Land

Author: Amanda Craig

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 439

CHOSEN AS BOOK OF THE YEAR BY THE GUARDIAN, OBSERVER, TELEGRAPH, NEW STATESMAN, EVENING STANDARD, SUNDAY TIMES AND IRISH TIMES 'Terrific, page-turning, slyly funny' India Knight 'As satisfying a novel as I have read in years' Sarah Perry 'Amanda Craig is one of the most brilliant and entertaining novelists now working in Britain' Alison Lurie Quentin and Lottie Bredin, like many modern couples, can't afford to divorce. Having lost their jobs in the recession, they can't afford to go on living in London; instead, they must downsize and move their three children to a house in a remote part of Devon. Arrogant and adulterous, Quentin can't understand why Lottie is so angry; devastated and humiliated, Lottie feels herself to have been intolerably wounded. Mud, mice and quarrels are one thing - but why is their rent so low? What is the mystery surrounding their unappealing new home? The beauty of the landscape is ravishing, yet it conceals a dark side involving poverty, revenge, abuse and violence which will rise up to threaten them. Sally Verity, happily married but unhappily childless knows a different side to country life, as both a Health Visitor and a sheep farmer's wife; and when Lottie's innocent teenage son Xan gets a zero-hours contract at a local pie factory, he sees yet another. At the end of their year, the lives of all will be changed for ever. A suspenseful black comedy, this is a rich, compassionate and enthralling novel in its depiction of the English countryside, and the potentially lethal interplay between money and marriage.

The Lies of the Land

An Honest History of Political Deceit

Author: Adam Macqueen

Publisher: Atlantic Books

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 352

View: 987

Trust in our politicians is at an all-time low. We're in a "post-truth" era, where feelings trump facts, and where brazen rhetoric beats honesty. But do politicians lie more than they used to? And do we even want them to tell the truth? In a history full of wit and political acumen, Private Eye journalist Adam Macqueen dissects the gripping stories of the biggest political lies of the last half century, from the Profumo affair to Blair's WMDs to Boris Johnson's £350 million for the NHS. Covering lesser known whoppers, infamous lies from foreign shores ("I did not have sexual relations with that woman"), and some of the resolute untruths from Donald Trump's explosive presidential campaign, this is the quintessential guide to dishonesty from our leaders - and the often pernicious relationship between parliament and the media. But this book is also so much more. It explains how in the space of a lifetime we have gone from the implicit assumption that our rulers have our best interests at heart, to assuming the worst even when - in the majority of cases - politicians are actually doing their best.

Deceit: The Lie of the Law

Author: Peter Macdonald Eggers

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 472

Deceit: The Lie of the Law will provide a complete and detailed account of the law of deceit as developed over the past two centuries. This new book by Peter MacDonald Eggers examines the commercial, contractual and civil relationships in which claims in deceit have been made.

The Lie of the Land

Migrant Workers and the California Landscape

Author: Don Mitchell

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 819

The Lies of the Land

A Guide to Our Corrupt Society

Author: David Corbett

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 292

View: 786

In this book, we take a look at some common deviations of human behavior as well as some fears about global warming and over-population. We also consider how the human mind works and how it can be used to a person's advantage.Deceit and misrepresentation is not confined to our rulers but is also common in all endeavors - for example in the areas of Health, Education and the Legal system - where certain individuals try to achieve supremacy.

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