Search Results: the-life-and-death-of-smallpox

The Life and Death of Smallpox

Author: Ian Glynn,Jenifer Glynn

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521845427

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 278

View: 3457

Examines the history and devastating impact of smallpox, the first-ever disease to be eradicated, along with the potential implications of the disease for use in future biological warfare.

The Life and Death of Smallpox

Author: Ian Glynn,Jenifer Glynn

Publisher: Profile Books(GB)

ISBN: 9781861976932

Category: Bioterrorism

Page: 278

View: 6032

No other disease has such a long, dramatic, and terrible history as smallpox. It is the first (and so far the only) disease to be totally eradicated. But the scourge may come back in biological warfare. From ancient Egypt, India and China, smallpox spread around the world. It defeated armies, relieved sieges, killed emperors, played havoc with dynasties, helped to establish Buddhism in Japan, and at about the time of Muhammad's birth it stopped Christian Abyssinians from capturing a still pagan Mecca. When individual epidemics were killing tens of thousands in the early 18th century, the adoption of the 'folk-medicine' practice of inoculating with smallpox itself gave some protection to those inoculated - but at the cost of spreading the infection. In the 1790s Edward Jenner's brilliant experiments in 'vaccinating' with cowpox brought hope, not only of saving lives but also of eventually eradicating the disease. The practice spread round the world astonishingly fast. It took over two hundred years to achieve world-wide eradication; and it remains a magnificent and so far a unique scientific and political achievement. But now smallpox is one of the first choices for international bio-terrorism. This book tells the fascinating and frightening story of this terrifying disease, from the pustules on the mummy of Ramses V to current anxieties - a brilliant mixture of history, science and politics.

The Angel of Death

Author: William Shambaugh

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1300217480

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1407

Scourge

The Once and Future Threat of Smallpox

Author: Jonathan B. Tucker

Publisher: Grove Press

ISBN: 9780802139399

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1738

A history of one of the world's deadliest diseases traces the influence of smallpox on the course of human civilization, describes Jenner's creation of a vaccine, outlines the World Health Organization's eradication efforts, and discusses the dangers it still poses today as a possible terrorist weapon.

Pox Americana

The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82

Author: Elizabeth A. Fenn

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780809078219

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 8772

Recreates one of the most overlooked chapters in American history--the smallpox epidemic that coincided with the Revolutionary War--tracing its influence on colonial life and the course of the war.

House on Fire

The Fight to Eradicate Smallpox

Author: William H. Foege,Milbank Memorial Fund

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520268369

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 218

View: 8230

“Bill Foege takes us inside the world's greatest public health triumph: the eradication of smallpox. It's a story of true determination, passion and courage. The story of smallpox should encourage all of us to continue the critical work of worldwide disease eradication.”--Bill Gates, Co-Chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation “Bill Foege is one of the public health giants of our times. He was responsible for the design of the campaign that eradicated smallpox—the most important global health achievement in history and possibly the greatest feat in any field of international cooperation. His insights into the nature of this major event will undoubtedly help to meet the global health challenges of the 21st century.”—Julio Frenk, M.D, PhD, Dean, Harvard School of Public Health “The eradication of a disease has long been the holy grail of global health and Bill Foege found it: more than any other person, he was responsible for the eradication of smallpox from the face of the earth. This is a story told by a remarkably humble man, about the extraordinary coalition that he helped to build, and the most impressive global health accomplishment the world has ever seen.”—Mark Rosenberg, author of Real Collaboration: What It Takes for Global Health to Succeed “I am thrilled that Bill Foege, one of the great heroes of the smallpox eradication campaign, has written this important book. It tells a beautiful human story of an incredible public health triumph, and is full of lessons that could be applied to many of the global challenges we face today.”—Helene D. Gayle MD, President and CEO, CARE USA “Bill Foege’s House on Fire is the first-hand account of how a revised strategy to eradicate smallpox was tested, validated, and applied. Without the global adoption of this new surveillance strategy, the final deathblow to this longtime global menace might never have been dealt.”—Adetokunbo O. Lucas, MD, DSc, author of It Was The Best of Times: From Local to Global Health “Smallpox is the most devastating disease the world has known, as it destroyed lives and shaped history over the centuries. House on Fire provides a day-to-day account by my friend Dr. Bill Foege of the battle required to defeat this wily and diabolic virus."--President Jimmy Carter

Dr. Jenner and the Speckled Monster

The Search for the Smallpox Vaccine

Author: Albert Marrin

Publisher: Dutton Childrens Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 120

View: 2102

Provides readers with the factual story of how a small country doctor found and developed the worldÆs first vaccine in 1796 that lead to the end of the epidemic of small pox throughout the world.

The Fever of 1721

The Epidemic That Revolutionized Medicine and American Politics

Author: Stephen Coss

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 147678308X

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 7399

More than fifty years before the American Revolution, Boston was in revolt against the tyrannies of the Crown, Puritan Authority, and Superstition. This is the story of a fateful year that prefigured the events of 1776. In The Fever of 1721, Stephen Coss brings to life an amazing cast of characters in a year that changed the course of medical history, American journalism, and colonial revolution, including Cotton Mather, the great Puritan preacher, son of the president of Harvard College; Zabdiel Boylston, a doctor whose name is on one of Boston’s grand avenues; James and his younger brother Benjamin Franklin; and Elisha Cooke and his protégé Samuel Adams. During the worst smallpox epidemic in Boston history Mather convinced Doctor Boylston to try a procedure that he believed would prevent death—by making an incision in the arm of a healthy person and implanting it with smallpox. “Inoculation” led to vaccination, one of the most profound medical discoveries in history. Public outrage forced Boylston into hiding, and Mather’s house was firebombed. A political fever also raged. Elisha Cooke was challenging the Crown for control of the colony and finally forced Royal Governor Samuel Shute to flee Massachusetts. Samuel Adams and the Patriots would build on this to resist the British in the run-up to the American Revolution. And a bold young printer James Franklin (who was on the wrong side of the controversy on inoculation), launched America’s first independent newspaper and landed in jail. His teenage brother and apprentice, Benjamin Franklin, however, learned his trade in James’s shop and became a father of the Independence movement. One by one, the atmosphere in Boston in 1721 simmered and ultimately boiled over, leading to the full drama of the American Revolution.

The Speckled Monster

Author: Jennifer Lee Carrell

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 144062335X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 496

View: 6768

The Speckled Monster tells the dramatic story of two parents who dared to fight back against smallpox. After barely surviving the agony of smallpox themselves, they flouted eighteenth-century medicine by borrowing folk knowledge from African slaves and Eastern women in frantic bids to protect their children. From their heroic struggles stems the modern science of immunology as well as the vaccinations that remain our only hope should the disease ever be unleashed again. Jennifer Lee Carrell transports readers back to the early eighteenth century to tell the tales of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Dr. Zabdiel Boylston, two iconoclastic figures who helped save London and Boston from the deadliest disease mankind has known.

Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity

Author: Michael Kinch

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681778203

Category: Science

Page: 360

View: 9971

A smart and compelling examination of the science of immunity, the public policy implications of vaccine denial, and the real-world outcomes of failing to vaccinate. If you have a child in school, you may have heard stories of long-dormant diseases suddenly reappearing—cases of measles, mumps, rubella, and whooping cough cropping up everywhere from elementary schools to Ivy League universities because a select group of parents refuse to vaccinate their children. Between Hope and Fear tells the remarkable story of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and their social and political implications. While detailing the history of vaccine invention, Kinch reveals the ominous reality that our victories against vaccine-preventable diseases are not permanent—and could easily be undone. In the tradition of John Barry’s The Great Influenza and Siddhartha Mukherjee’s The Emperor of All Maladies, Between Hope and Fear relates the remarkable intersection of science, technology and disease that has helped eradicate many of the deadliest plagues known to man.

The End of Plagues

The Global Battle Against Infectious Disease

Author: John Rhodes

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137381310

Category: Medical

Page: 256

View: 3509

At the turn of the twentieth century, smallpox claimed the lives of two million people per year. By 1979, the disease had been eradicated and victory was declared across the globe. Yet the story of smallpox remains the exception, as today a host of deadly contagions, from polio to AIDS, continue to threaten human health around the world. Spanning three centuries, The End of Plagues weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases. From Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, world-renown immunologist John Rhodes charts our fight against these plagues, and shows how vaccinations gave humanity the upper hand. Today, aid groups including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization have made the eradication of polio a priority, and Rhodes takes us behind the scenes to witness how soon we may be celebrating the eradication of polio.

Vaccine

The Controversial Story of Medicine's Greatest Lifesaver

Author: Arthur Allen

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393059113

Category: Medical

Page: 523

View: 4450

A definitive history of vaccination ranges from Edward Jenner's 1796 creation of the world's first smallpox inoculation to the present day, looking at both the benefits of vaccination as well as the current controversy over their potential neurological side effects and the pharmaceutical companies' emphasis on treatment rather than prevention.

The Demon in the Freezer

Author: Richard Preston

Publisher: Fawcett Books

ISBN: 0345466632

Category: Science

Page: 292

View: 6753

Now in paperback--the timely and terrifying investigation into the dark underworld of biological weapons from the #1 "New York Times" bestselling author of "The Hot Zone."

Smallpox: The Death of a Disease

The Inside Story of Eradicating a Worldwide Killer

Author: D. A. Henderson, M.D.

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 161592230X

Category: Science

Page: 334

View: 4962

For more than 3000 years, hundreds of millions of people have died or been left permanently scarred or blind by the relentless, incurable disease called smallpox. In 1967, Dr. D.A. Henderson became director of a worldwide campaign to eliminate this disease from the face of the earth. This spellbinding book is Dr. Henderson’s personal story of how he led the World Health Organization’s campaign to eradicate smallpox—the only disease in history to have been deliberately eliminated. Some have called this feat "the greatest scientific and humanitarian achievement of the past century." In a lively, engrossing narrative, Dr. Henderson makes it clear that the gargantuan international effort involved more than straightforward mass vaccination. He and his staff had to cope with civil wars, floods, impassable roads, and refugees as well as formidable bureaucratic and cultural obstacles, shortages of local health personnel and meager budgets. Countries across the world joined in the effort; the United States and the Soviet Union worked together through the darkest cold war days; and professionals from more than 70 nations served as WHO field staff. On October 26, 1976, the last case of smallpox occurred. The disease that annually had killed two million people or more had been vanquished–and in just over ten years. The story did not end there. Dr. Henderson recounts in vivid detail the continuing struggle over whether to destroy the remaining virus in the two laboratories still that held it. Then came the startling discovery that the Soviet Union had been experimenting with smallpox virus as a biological weapon and producing it in large quantities. The threat of its possible use by a rogue nation or a terrorist has had to be taken seriously and Dr. Henderson has been a central figure in plans for coping with it. New methods for mass smallpox vaccination were so successful that he sought to expand the program of smallpox immunization to include polio, measles, whooping cough, diphtheria, and tetanus vaccines. That program now reaches more than four out of five children in the world and is eradicating poliomyelitis. This unique book is to be treasured—a personal and true story that proves that through cooperation and perseverance the most daunting of obstacles can be overcome.

Born to Die

Disease and New World Conquest, 1492-1650

Author: Noble David Cook

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521627306

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 9690

Cook explains that the conquest of the New World was achieved by a handful of Europeans - not by the sword, but by deadly disease.

When Plague Strikes

The Black Death, Smallpox, AIDS

Author: James Cross Giblin

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0064461955

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 224

View: 3024

Compassionate and arresting, this exploration of three major diseases that have changed the course of history—the bubonic plague, smallpox, and AIDS—chronicles their fearsome death toll, their lasting social, economic, and political implications, and how medical knowledge and treatments have advanced as a result of the crises they have occasioned. "A book that would serve well for reports, but it is also a fascinating read."—SLJ. Best Books of 1995 (SLJ) Notable Children's Trade Books in Social Studies 1996 (NCSS/CBC) 1995 Young Adult Editors’ Choices (BL) 1995 Top of the List Non Fiction (BL) 1996 Best Books for Young Adults (ALA) Notable Children’s Books of 1996 (ALA)

Smallpox, Syphilis and Salvation

Medical Breakthroughs that Changed the World

Author: Sheryl Persson

Publisher: Exisle Publishing

ISBN: 1921497572

Category: Medical

Page: 352

View: 8847

Since ancient times the search for cures for the great scourges that have afflicted humankind has been an ongoing quest, but it is only within the last 200 years that major breakthroughs have occurred and the development of modern medicine has accelerated. The stories behind these miraculous cures are those of intense rivalries and jealousies, bitter public humiliation, unswerving dedication, subterfuge, and great personal struggles. Often these medical advances have truly changed the world. When Edward Jenner developed the concept of vaccination, and with it the cure for smallpox, he found a way to defeat a disease that had affected half a billion people — more than all those affected by wars and other epidemics combined. And while the Black Death still lingers in pockets around the world, it no longer threatens to destroy entire civilisations as it once did. SMALLPOX, SYPHILIS AND SALVATION uncovers the compelling stories of the men and women, innovations and accidents that have led to diseases from polio to syphilis, diphtheria to diabetes, tetanus to leukaemia no longer being the death sentences they once were. It also sounds a note of warning — for some of these diseases are fighting back. It is estimated that tuberculosis now claims one life every fifteen seconds, while new 'superbugs' are resistant to penicillin and other antibiotics. Diseases may once again threaten to crush the world's population, either in the form of biological warfare or simply because they want to survive as much as we do ...

Pox

An American History

Author: Michael Willrich

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101476222

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 1734

The untold story of how America's Progressive-era war on smallpox sparked one of the great civil liberties battles of the twentieth century. At the turn of the last century, a powerful smallpox epidemic swept the United States from coast to coast. The age-old disease spread swiftly through an increasingly interconnected American landscape: from southern tobacco plantations to the dense immigrant neighborhoods of northern cities to far-flung villages on the edges of the nascent American empire. In Pox, award-winning historian Michael Willrich offers a gripping chronicle of how the nation's continentwide fight against smallpox launched one of the most important civil liberties struggles of the twentieth century. At the dawn of the activist Progressive era and during a moment of great optimism about modern medicine, the government responded to the deadly epidemic by calling for universal compulsory vaccination. To enforce the law, public health authorities relied on quarantines, pesthouses, and "virus squads"-corps of doctors and club-wielding police. Though these measures eventually contained the disease, they also sparked a wave of popular resistance among Americans who perceived them as a threat to their health and to their rights. At the time, anti-vaccinationists were often dismissed as misguided cranks, but Willrich argues that they belonged to a wider legacy of American dissent that attended the rise of an increasingly powerful government. While a well-organized anti-vaccination movement sprang up during these years, many Americans resisted in subtler ways-by concealing sick family members or forging immunization certificates. Pox introduces us to memorable characters on both sides of the debate, from Henning Jacobson, a Swedish Lutheran minister whose battle against vaccination went all the way to the Supreme Court, to C. P. Wertenbaker, a federal surgeon who saw himself as a medical missionary combating a deadly-and preventable-disease. As Willrich suggests, many of the questions first raised by the Progressive-era antivaccination movement are still with us: How far should the government go to protect us from peril? What happens when the interests of public health collide with religious beliefs and personal conscience? In Pox, Willrich delivers a riveting tale about the clash of modern medicine, civil liberties, and government power at the turn of the last century that resonates powerfully today.

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