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The Living Landscape

How to Read it and Understand it

Author: Patrick Whitefield

Publisher: Permanent Publications

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 333

View: 372

Patrick Whitefield shares a lifetime’s knowledge of the myriad interactions that go to make up the fascinating and varied landscapes we see all around us. He will inspire you to reconnect with the land as a living entity, not a collection of different scenery, and develop an active relationship with nature and the countryside. The Living Landscape opens with a chapter on how to go about reading the landscape. The following chapters then go on to look in detail into landscape formation, from rocks, through soil, to vegetation, and the intricate web of interactions among plants, animals, climate, and people that makes the landscape around us. Each chapter is interspersed with diagrams, sketches, and notes that Patrick has taken over two decades of living and working in the countryside. This book invites you to engage actively with nature and experience it firsthand. Understanding how landscapes evolve is a useful skill for landscape designers, gardeners, and farmers large and small, but it is also a life-enhancing skill all of us can enjoy. Whitefield offers us the enduring pleasure that costs nothing and yet offers everything.

Research Handbook on Biodiversity and Law

Author: Michael Bowman

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN:

Category: LAW

Page: 512

View: 919

The crucial importance of biodiversity law to future human welfare is only now being fully appreciated. This wide-ranging Handbook presents a range of perspectives from leading international experts reflecting up-to-date research thinking on the vital subject of biodiversity and its interaction with law. Through a rigorous examination of the principles, procedures and practices that characterise this area of law, this timely volume effectively highlights its objectives, implementation, achievements, and prospects. More specifically, the work addresses the regulatory challenges posed by the principal contemporary threats to biological diversity, the applicable general principles of international environmental law and the visions, values and voices that are shaping the development of the law. Presenting thematic rather than regime-based coverage, the editors demonstrate the state-of-the-art of current research and identify future research needs and directions. This comprehensive and authoritative Handbook will be an indispensable resource for legal scholars, students and practitioners alike.

How to Read the American West

A Field Guide

Author: William Wyckoff

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 931

From deserts to ghost towns, from national forests to California bungalows, many of the features of the western American landscape are well known to residents and travelers alike. But in How to Read the American West, William Wyckoff introduces readers anew to these familiar landscapes. A geographer and an accomplished photographer, Wyckoff offers a fresh perspective on the natural and human history of the American West and encourages readers to discover that history has shaped the places where people live, work, and visit. This innovative field guide includes stories, photographs, maps, and diagrams on a hundred landscape features across the American West. Features are grouped according to type, such as natural landscapes, farms and ranches, places of special cultural identity, and cities and suburbs. Unlike the geographic organization of a traditional guidebook, Wyckoff's field guide draws attention to the connections and the differences between and among places. Emphasizing features that recur from one part of the region to another, the guide takes readers on an exploration of the eleven western states with trips into their natural and cultural character. How to Read the American West is an ideal traveling companion on the main roads and byways in the West, providing unexpected insights into the landscapes you see out your car window. It is also a wonderful source for armchair travelers and people who live in the West who want to learn more about the modern West, how it came to be, and how it may change in the years to come. Showcasing the everyday alongside the exceptional, Wyckoff demonstrates how asking new questions about the landscapes of the West can let us see our surroundings more clearly, helping us make informed and thoughtful decisions about their stewardship in the twenty-first century. Watch the trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYSmp5gZ4-I

The Living Landscape

Designing for Beauty and Biodiversity in the Home Garden

Author: Rick Darke

Publisher: Timber Press

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 392

View: 402

Many gardeners today want a home landscape that nourishes and fosters wildlife. But they also want beauty, a space for the kids to play, privacy, and maybe even a vegetable patch. Sure, it’s a tall order, but The Living Landscape shows how to do it. By combining the insights of two outstanding authors, it offers a model that anyone can follow. Inspired by its examples, you’ll learn the strategies for making and maintaining a diverse, layered landscape—one that offers beauty on many levels, provides outdoor rooms and turf areas for children and pets, incorporates fragrance and edible plants, and provides cover, shelter, and sustenance for wildlife. Richly illustrated with superb photographs and informed by both a keen eye for design and an understanding of how healthy ecologies work, The Living Landscape will enable you to create a garden that is full of life and that fulfills both human needs and the needs of wildlife communities.

Understanding the Neolithic

Author: Julian Thomas

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 473

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Artificial Intelligence – Agents and Environments

Author:

Publisher: Bookboon

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 885

The Bible's Answers to 100 of Life's Biggest Questions

Author: Norman L. Geisler

Publisher: Baker Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 100

Every believer has questions about God, the Bible, Jesus, and the purpose and meaning of life. The vexing problem is that so few believers are able to answer even the most basic ones. Without answers, doubt creeps in and the future of the church is in jeopardy. With insight and precision, Geisler and Jimenez address one hundred penetrating questions that the culture asks and Christians must be prepared to answer, including both controversial questions raging in the public sphere and personal questions about family issues, the purpose and meaning of life, and the future of the world. Christians from every walk of life, especially young believers, youth workers, and parents, will treasure this comprehensive resource. Foreword by Josh and Sean McDowell.

Landscapes

A practical guide to understanding, controlling and preventing depression by improving your health and well-being

Author: G. Oviedo

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 80

View: 644

Landscapes provides a practical and humane perspective to improve your well-being. You will find in this work practical information to understand the origins of depression and create an action plan focused on your health and well-being. The book provides an important guide on how to improve your fitness, obtain better nutrition, and a different perspective on Love and human relationships as sources of happiness. Landscapes is an excellent tool for anyone who desires to improve their Quality of life.

Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology

Studies in the Neotropical Lowlands

Author: William L. Balée

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 617

This collection of studies by anthropologists, botanists, ecologists, and biologists is an important contribution to the emerging field of historical ecology. The book combines cutting-edge research with new perspectives to emphasize the close relationship between humans and their natural environment. Contributors examine how alterations in the natural world mirror human cultures, societies, and languages. Treating the landscape like a text, these researchers decipher patterns and meaning in the Ecuadorian Andes, Amazonia, the desert coast of Peru, and other regions in the neotropics. They show how local peoples have changed the landscape over time to fit their needs by managing and modifying species diversity, enhancing landscape heterogeneity, and controlling ecological disturbance. In turn, the environment itself becomes a form of architecture rich with historical and archaeological significance. Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology explores thousands of years of ecological history while also addressing important contemporary issues, such as biodiversity and genetic variation and change. Engagingly written and expertly researched, this book introduces and exemplifies a unique method for better understanding the link between humans and the biosphere.

Listening to the Land

Native American Literary Responses to the Landscape

Author: Lee Schweninger

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 602

For better or worse, representations abound of Native Americans as a people with an innate and special connection to the earth. This study looks at the challenges faced by Native American writers who confront stereotypical representations as they assert their own ethical relationship with the earth. Lee Schweninger considers a range of genres (memoirs, novels, stories, essays) by Native writers from various parts of the United States. Contextualizing these works within the origins, evolution, and perpetuation of the “green” labels imposed on American Indians, Schweninger shows how writers often find themselves denying some land ethic stereotypes while seeming to embrace others. Taken together, the time periods covered inListening to the Landspan more than a hundred years, from Luther Standing Bear’s description of his late-nineteenth-century life on the prairie to Linda Hogan’s account of a 1999 Makah hunt of a gray whale. Two-thirds of the writers Schweninger considers, however, are well-known voices from the second half of the twentieth century, including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Vine Deloria Jr., Gerald Vizenor, and Louis Owens. Few ecocritical studies have focused on indigenous environmental attitudes, in comparison to related work done by historians and anthropologists.Listening to the Landwill narrow this gap in the scholarship; moreover, it will add individual Native American perspectives to an understanding of what, to these writers, is a genuine Native American philosophy regarding the land.

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