Search Results: the-long-lingering-shadow-slavery-race-and-law-in-the-american-hemisphere-studies-in-the-legal-history-of-the-south-ser

The Long, Lingering Shadow

Slavery, Race, and Law in the American Hemisphere

Author: Robert J. Cottrol

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820344052

Category: Law

Page: 370

View: 6979

Students of American history know of the law's critical role in systematizing a racial hierarchy in the United States. Showing that this history is best appreciated in a comparative perspective, The Long, Lingering Shadow looks at the parallel legal histories of race relations in the United States, Brazil, and Spanish America. Robert J. Cottrol takes the reader on a journey from the origins of New World slavery in colonial Latin America to current debates and litigation over affirmative action in Brazil and the United States, as well as contemporary struggles against racial discrimination and Afro-Latin invisibility in the Spanish-speaking nations of the hemisphere. Ranging across such topics as slavery, emancipation, scientific racism, immigration policies, racial classifications, and legal processes, Cottrol unravels a complex odyssey. By the eve of the Civil War, the U.S. slave system was rooted in a legal and cultural foundation of racial exclusion unmatched in the Western Hemisphere. That system's legacy was later echoed in Jim Crow, the practice of legally mandated segregation. Jim Crow in turn caused leading Latin Americans to regard their nations as models of racial equality because their laws did not mandate racial discrimination--a belief that masked very real patterns of racism throughout the Americas. And yet, Cottrol says, if the United States has had a history of more-rigid racial exclusion, since the Second World War it has also had a more thorough civil rights revolution, with significant legal victories over racial discrimination. Cottrol explores this remarkable transformation and shows how it is now inspiring civil rights activists throughout the Americas.

Latin American Law

A History of Private Law and Institutions in Spanish America

Author: M. C. Mirow

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292778589

Category: Law

Page: 359

View: 6369

Private law touches every aspect of people's daily lives—landholding, inheritance, private property, marriage and family relations, contracts, employment, and business dealings—and the court records and legal documents produced under private law are a rich source of information for anyone researching social, political, economic, or environmental history. But to utilize these records fully, researchers need a fundamental understanding of how private law and legal institutions functioned in the place and time period under study. This book offers the first comprehensive introduction in either English or Spanish to private law in Spanish Latin America from the colonial period to the present. M. C. Mirow organizes the book into three substantial sections that describe private law and legal institutions in the colonial period, the independence era and nineteenth century, and the twentieth century. Each section begins with an introduction to the nature and function of private law during the period and discusses such topics as legal education and lawyers, legal sources, courts, land, inheritance, commercial law, family law, and personal status. Each section also presents themes of special interest during its respective time period, including slavery, Indian status, codification, land reform, and development and globalization.

Drowning in Laws

Labor Law and Brazilian Political Culture

Author: John D. French

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807863556

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7681

Since 1943, the lives of Brazilian working people and their employers have been governed by the Consolidation of Labor Laws (CLT). Seen as the end of an exclusively repressive approach, the CLT was long hailed as one of the world's most advanced bodies of social legislation. In Drowning in Laws, John D. French examines the juridical origins of the CLT and the role it played in the cultural and political formation of the Brazilian working class. Focusing on the relatively open political era known as the Populist Republic of 1945 to 1964, French illustrates the glaring contrast between the generosity of the CLT's legal promises and the meager justice meted out in workplaces, government ministries, and labor courts. He argues that the law, from the outset, was more an ideal than a set of enforceable regulations--there was no intention on the part of leaders and bureaucrats to actually practice what was promised, yet workers seized on the CLT's utopian premises while attacking its systemic flaws. In the end, French says, the labor laws became "real" in the workplace only to the extent that workers struggled to turn the imaginary ideal into reality.

Through the Arc of the Rain Forest

Author: Karen Tei Yamashita

Publisher: Coffee House Press

ISBN: 1566895049

Category: Fiction

Page: 185

View: 8977

"Fluid and poetic as well as terrifying." —New York Times Book Review "Dazzling . . . a seamless mixture of magic realism, satire and futuristic fiction." —San Francisco Chronicle "Impressive . . . a flight of fancy through a dreamlike Brazil." —Village Voice "Surreal and misty, sweeping from one high-voltage scene to another." —LA Weekly "Amuses and frightens at the same time." —Newsday "Incisive and funny, this book yanks our chains and makes us see the absurdity that rules our world." —Booklist (starred review) "Expansive and ambitious . . . incredible and complicated." —Library Journal "This satiric morality play about the destruction of the Amazon rain forest unfolds with a diversity and fecundity equal to its setting. . . . Yamashita seems to have thrown into the pot everything she knows and most that she can imagine—all to good effect." —Publishers Weekly A Japanese man with a ball floating six inches in front of his head, an American CEO with three arms, and a Brazilian peasant who discovers the art of healing by tickling one's earlobe, rise to the heights of wealth and fame, before arriving at disasters—both personal and ecological—that destroy the rain forest and all the birds of Brazil. Karen Tei Yamashita is the author of Through the Arc of the Rain Forest, Brazil-Maru, Tropic of Orange, Circle K Cycles, I Hotel, and Anime Wong, all published by Coffee House Press. I Hotel was selected as a finalist for the National Book Award and awarded the California Book Award, the American Book Award, the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association Award, and the Association for Asian American Studies Book Award.

A People's History of the United States

1492-Present

Author: Howard Zinn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325303

Category: History

Page: 744

View: 9957

This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.

Social Control and Justice

Crimmigration in the Age of Fear

Author: Maria João Guia,Joanne van der Leun

Publisher: Eleven International Pub

ISBN: 9789490947781

Category: Law

Page: 340

View: 7733

This book offers a fresh, multi-disciplinary, and international examination of a phenomenon that has altered the landscape of migration in the United States and is now taking root in Canada and throughout Europe: 'crimmigration law.' Crimmigration law consists of the letter and practice of laws and policies at the intersection of criminal law and immigration law. Crimmigration scholars study the creation of laws and policies, their enforcement, as well as the institutional dynamics that create crimmigration law and are created by it. Many have written about the use of crimmigration law to exert social control over groups marginalized by ethnic bias, class, or citizenship status. This book's contents include: Crimmigration, Securitization, and the Criminal Law of the Crimmigrant * A Reflection on Crimmigration in the Netherlands * Entering the Risk Society: A Contested Terrain for Immigration Enforcement * The Changing Landscape of the Criminalization of Migration in Europe * Disappearing Rights: How States Are Eroding Membership in American Society * The Impact of Immigration Enforcement Outsourcing on Ice Priorities * The Spirit of Crimmigration * Crime and Immigration: The Discourses of Fear as a Theoretical Approach of Critical Evaluation * Recorded Crime Committed by Migrant Groups and Native Dutch in the Netherlands * The Foreign-Born in the Canadian Federal Correctional Population * The Impact of Safety on Levels of Ethnocentrism * The Control of Irregular Migrants and the Criminal Law of the Enemy * Crime among Irregular Immigrants and the Influence of Crimmigration Processes * The Wide Scope of Immigration in the Azores and Its Relationship with Crime * Irregular Immigrants and Their Irish Citizen Children: The Limits of National Citizenship * The Treaty of Prum * Unauthorized Migration

White Women's Rights

The Racial Origins of Feminism in the United States

Author: Louise Michele Newman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198028865

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 6307

This study reinterprets a crucial period (1870s-1920s) in the history of women's rights, focusing attention on a core contradiction at the heart of early feminist theory. At a time when white elites were concerned with imperialist projects and civilizing missions, progressive white women developed an explicit racial ideology to promote their cause, defending patriarchy for "primitives" while calling for its elimination among the "civilized." By exploring how progressive white women at the turn of the century laid the intellectual groundwork for the feminist social movements that followed, Louise Michele Newman speaks directly to contemporary debates about the effect of race on current feminist scholarship. "White Women's Rights is an important book. It is a fascinating and informative account of the numerous and complex ties which bound feminist thought to the practices and ideas which shaped and gave meaning to America as a racialized society. A compelling read, it moves very gracefully between the general history of the feminist movement and the particular histories of individual women."--Hazel Carby, Yale University

The American Conflict

A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-'64: Its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to Exhibit Especially Its Moral and Political Phases, with the Drift and Progress of American Opinion Respecting Human Slavery from 1776 to the Close of the War for the Union

Author: Horace Greeley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Slavery

Page: 37

View: 1907

Brown V. Board of Education

Caste, Culture, and the Constitution

Author: Robert J. Cottrol,Leland Ware

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780700612895

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 3934

Tracing the litigations, highlighting the pivotal role of the NAACP, and including incisive portraits of key players, this book simply but powerfully shows that "Brown" not only changed the national equation of race and caste, it also changed our view of the Court's role in American life.

Rethinking Race in Modern Argentina

Author: Paulina Alberto,Eduardo Elena

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316477843

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2008

This book reconsiders the relationship between race and nation in Argentina during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and places Argentina firmly in dialog with the literature on race and nation in Latin America, from where it has long been excluded or marginalized for being a white, European exception in a mixed-race region. The contributors, based both in North America and Argentina, hail from the fields of history, anthropology, and literary and cultural studies. Their essays collectively destabilize widespread certainties about Argentina, showing that whiteness in that country has more in common with practices and ideologies of Mestizaje and 'racial democracy' elsewhere in the region than has typically been acknowledged. The essays also situate Argentina within the well-established literature on race, nation, and whiteness in world regions beyond Latin America (particularly, other European 'settler societies'). The collection thus contributes to rethinking race for other global contexts as well.

Sources of Law, Legal Change, and Ambiguity

Author: Alan Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 151282156X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 192

View: 3486

Why is the law notoriously unclear, arcane, slow to change in the face of changing circumstances? In this sweeping comparative analysis of the lawmaking process from ancient Rome to the present day, Alan Watson argues that the answer has largely to do with the mixed ancestry of modern law, the confusion of sources—custom, legislation, scholarly writing, and judicial precedent—from which it derives.

The Palgrave Handbook of State-Sponsored History After 1945

Author: Berber Bevernage,Nico Wouters

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1349953067

Category: History

Page: 877

View: 6854

This handbook provides the first systematic integrated analysis of the role that states or state actors play in the construction of history and public memory after 1945. The book focuses on many different forms of state-sponsored history, including memory laws, monuments and memorials, state-archives, science policies, history in schools, truth commissions, historical expert commissions, the use of history in courts and tribunals etc. The handbook contributes to the study of history and public memory by combining elements of state-focused research in separate fields of study. By looking at the state’s memorialising capacities the book introduces an analytical perspective that is not often found in classical studies of the state. The handbook has a broad geographical focus and analyses cases from different regions around the world. The volume mainly tackles democratic contexts, although dictatorial regimes are not excluded.

On a hinge of history

the mutual vulnerability of South and North

Author: Ivan L. Head

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 244

View: 2999

Avengers of the New World

The Story of the Haitian Revolution

Author: Laurent DUBOIS,Laurent Dubois

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674034368

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 4616

Laurent Dubois weaves the stories of slaves, free people of African descent, wealthy whites and French administrators into an unforgettable tale of insurrection, war, heroism and victory.

Select Essays in Anglo-American Legal History;

Author: John Henry Wigmore,Ernst Freund,Association of American Law Schools

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 9781377982311

Category: History

Page: 878

View: 5853

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

With a Critical Eye

An Intellectual and His Times

Author: Arthur J. Vidich

Publisher: Newfound Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 491

View: 473

Internationally renowned sociologist, Arthur J. Vidich (1922-2006), was an active researcher and teacher whose career spanned the second half of the twentieth century. With a Critical Eye: An Intellectual and His Times recounts Vidich's career in the wider cultural context of his life and work. Providing a window into post-World War II intellectual life, the richness of the autobiography lies not only in Vidich's perspectives on the academic world, but also in his personal and sociological observations about the world around him. Best known for his book, Small Town in Mass Society (co-authored with Joseph Bensman, 1958), Vidich taught for more than forty years at the New School for Social Research in New York. He published eighteen books, co-edited a book series with Robert Jackall, and was the founding editor of the International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society.

The Neighborhood Has Its Own Rules

Latinos and African Americans in South Los Angeles

Author: Cid Martinez

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814762840

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 2057

South Los Angeles is often seen as ground zero for inter-racial conflict and violence in the United States. Since the 1940s, South LA has been predominantly a low-income African American neighborhood, and yet since the early 1990s Latino immigrants—mostly from Mexico and many undocumented—have moved in record numbers to the area. Given that more than a quarter million people live in South LA and that poverty rates exceed 30 percent, inter-racial conflict and violence surprises no one. The real question is: why hasn't there been more? Through vivid stories and interviews, The Neighborhood Has Its Own Rules provides an answer to this question. Based on in-depth ethnographic field work collected when the author, Cid Martinez, lived and worked in schools in South Central, this study reveals the day-to-day ways in which vibrant social institutions in South LA— its churches, its local politicians, and even its gangs—have reduced conflict and kept violence to a level that is manageable for its residents. Martinez argues that inter-racial conflict has not been managed through any coalition between different groups, but rather that these institutions have allowed established African Americans and newcomer Latinos to co-exist through avoidance—an under-appreciated strategy for managing conflict that plays a crucial role in America's low-income communities. Ultimately, this book proposes a different understanding of how neighborhood institutions are able to mitigate conflict and violence through several community dimensions of informal social controls.

The Access Principle

The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship

Author: John Willinsky

Publisher: The MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262512664

Category: Computers

Page: 287

View: 8896

An argument for extending the circulation of knowledge with new publishing technologies considers scholarly, economic, philosophical, and practical issues.

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