Search Results: the-lost-art-of-finding-our-way

The Lost Art of Finding Our Way

Author: John Edward Huth

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674074815

Category: Science

Page: 539

View: 3399

Long before GPS and Google Earth, humans traveled vast distances using environmental clues and simple instruments. What else is lost when technology substitutes for our innate capacity to find our way? Illustrated with 200 drawings, this narrative—part treatise, part travelogue, and part navigational history—brings our own world into sharper view.

The Lost Art of Finding Our Way

Author: John Edward Huth

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674072820

Category: Science

Page: 528

View: 9168

Explains a process of navigation that relies on natural phenomenon and describes techniques followed by ancient people involving the Sun, Moon, tides, currents, wind, and the horizon that can be used to determine direction and ensure arrival at a safe destination.

The Lost Art of Finding Our Way

Author: John Edward Huth

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674074831

Category: Science

Page: 538

View: 5557

Long before GPS and Google Earth, humans traveled vast distances using environmental clues and simple instruments. What else is lost when technology substitutes for our innate capacity to find our way? Illustrated with 200 drawings, this narrative—part treatise, part travelogue, and part navigational history—brings our own world into sharper view.

Finding the Lost Art of Empathy

Connecting Human to Human in a Disconnected World

Author: Tracy Wilde

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501156292

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 9420

Tracy Wilde, rising celebrity pastor who helped launch the LA Bible Study in Hollywood, reflects on the absence of empathy in today’s world and shares how Christians can renew their compassion to help unify not only the church, but society as well. In Finding the Lost Art of Empathy, Tracy Wilde addresses the reasons why we struggle with showing empathy toward others and explains why we ultimately avoid it—and even avoid contact with others altogether. She explores the different facets that have promoted isolation instead of community and provides the antidote for a more unified, loving, and empathetic society. In this book Wilde hopes to inspire all of us to self-reflect and remove those obstacles from our lives so that we can experience true fulfillment in our relationships—the way God intended us to.

The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs

Use Outdoor Clues to Find Your Way, Predict the Weather, Locate Water, Track Animals--and Other Forgotten Skills

Author: Tristan Gooley

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 1615192417

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 6137

If you're walking with Tristan Gooley, leave your smartphone at home! Gooley's more than two decades of pioneering outdoor experience include research among the Dayak people of Borneo and the Tuareg of the Sahara. With his first book,The Natural Navigator, he started a renaissance in the rare art of reading nature's clues. Now, in The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs, Gooley has compiled more than 850 outdoor tips—many not found in any other book in the world—that will open readers' eyes to nature's hidden logic. He shares techniques for forecasting and tracking, and for walking in the country or city, along the coast, and by night. This is the ultimate resource on what the land, sun, moon, stars, plants, animals, and clouds can reveal—if you only know how to look!

Finding Your Way Without Map or Compass

Author: Harold Gatty

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486318931

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 5390

Useful, instructive manual shows would-be explorers, hikers, bikers, scouts, sailors, and survivalists how to find their way outdoors by observing animals, weather patterns, shifting sands, and other elements of nature.

Navigation Through the Ages

Author: Donald Launer

Publisher: Sheridan House, Inc.

ISBN: 1574092782

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 9856

Donald Launer has held a US Coast Guard captain's license for over 25 years. He was Field Editor for the yearly Waterway Guide and he is currently contributing editor for Good Old Boat. He is the author of Dictionary of Nautical Acronyms and Abbreviations and Lessons from My Good Old Boat.

The Natural Navigator

The Rediscovered Art of Letting Nature Be Your Guide

Author: Tristan Gooley

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 1615190465

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 1742

Before GPS, before the compass, and even before cartography, humankind was navigating. Now this singular guide helps us rediscover what our ancestors long understood—that a windswept tree, the depth of a puddle, or a trill of birdsong can help us find our way, if we know what to look and listen for. Adventurer and navigation expert Tristan Gooley unlocks the directional clues hidden in the sun, moon, stars, clouds, weather patterns, lengthening shadows, changing tides, plant growth, and the habits of wildlife. Rich with navigational anecdotes collected across ages, continents, and cultures, The Natural Navigator will help keep you on course and open your eyes to the wonders, large and small, of the natural world.

Finding Our Way

Leadership for an Uncertain Time (Large Print 16pt)

Author: Margaret J. Wheatley

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458777650

Category:

Page: 412

View: 8012

Margaret Wheatley is one of the most innovative and influential organizational thinkers of our time. For years, she has written eloquently about humanizing our organizations and helping people work together more effectively and compassionately. She has shown how breakthroughs in chaos theory and quantum physics can enable organizations to function as responsive, self-organizing living systems where creativity and commitment flourish, rather than cold mechanisms of control. Provocative, challenging, at times poetic, and often deeply moving, Finding Our Way touches on all the topics Wheatley has addressed throughout her illustrious career, showing how she has applied the ideas in her books in many different situations. ''The pieces presented here, '' she writes, ''represent ten years of work, of how I took the ideas in my books and applied them in practice in many different situations. Everything written here represents my current views on the subjects I write about.'' Incorporating her photographs and poetry in addition to her prose, Finding Our Way sums up Wheatley's thinking on everything from leadership and management to education and raising children in turbulent times, from societal commentary to specific organizational techniques, and more

Finding Our Way Home

Women's Accounts of Being Sent to Boarding School

Author: Nikki Simpson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351065521

Category: Psychology

Page: 138

View: 1326

Finding Our Way Home: Women’s Accounts of Being Sent to Boarding School shares the personal stories of sixteen women, all of whom were sent away to board at an early age. Their accounts delve into the depths of long suppressed emotions and feelings, and the lifelong impact that the early separation from their families has had. Much has been written about the impact of ‘boarding school syndrome’ on male boarders, but less about their female counterparts. This book is the first to explore the experience from a purely female perspective, and offers an intriguing insight into the world of boarding schools and the upbringing of girls born in the mid-to-late 20th century. Finding Our Way Home is a book for everyone who ever attended boarding school, as well as psychotherapists and counsellors working with boarding school survivors.

The Lost Art of Reading

Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time

Author: David L. Ulin

Publisher: Sasquatch Books

ISBN: 157061721X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 6792

Reading is a revolutionary act, an act of engagement in a culture that wants us to disengage. In The Lost Art of Reading, David L. Ulin asks a number of timely questions - why is literature important? What does it offer, especially now? Blending commentary with memoir, Ulin addresses the importance of the simple act of reading in an increasingly digital culture. Reading a book, flipping through hard pages, or shuffling them on screen - it doesn't matter. The key is the act of reading, and it's seriousness and depth. Ulin emphasizes the importance of reflection and pause allowed by stopping to read a book, and the accompanying focus required to let the mind run free in a world that is not one's own. Are we willing to risk our collective interest in contemplation, nuanced thinking, and empathy? Far from preaching to the choir, The Lost Art of Reading is a call to arms, or rather, to pages.

Finding Our Way Home

Author: Myke Johnson

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1365566862

Category: Religion

Page: 182

View: 1110

In this time of ecological crisis, all that is holycalls us into a more intimate partnership with the diverse and beautiful beings of this earth. InFinding Our Way Home, Myke Johnson reflects on her personal journey into such a partnership and offers a guide for others to begin this path. Lyrically expressed, it weaves together lessons from a chamomile flower, a small bird, a copper beech tree, a garden slug, and a forest fern, along with insights from Indigenous philosophy, environmental science, fractal geometry, childhood Catholic mysticism, the prophet Elijah, fairy tales, and permaculture design. This eco-spiritual journey also wrestles with the history of our society's destruction of the natural world, and its roots in the original theft of the land from Indigenous peoples. Exploring the spiritual dimensions of our brokenness, it offers tools to create healing. Finding Our Way Homeis a ceremony to remember our essential unity with all of life."

Lessons of the Lost

Finding Hope and Resilience in Work, Life, and the Wilderness

Author: Scott C. Hammond PhD

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 153200401X

Category: Self-Help

Page: 240

View: 6978

The wilderness can be unforgiving and dangerous, yet fill our souls with awe and wonder. It can overwhelm us with beauty and stun us with fear, lift our spirits to the highest highs and send us crashing to the floor of creation. The wilderness is a classroom where we learn to survive, thrive and sometimes die. At some point in our lives, we have all been lost in a wilderness of some kindwhether literal or metaphoricalwithout any direction on how to find our way back home. Some have faced survival decisions in community disasters or personal trauma. Some have been lost in work, wandered in careers and professions. Some have been lost in relationships, crippling addictions, health challenges, or grief. Scott Hammond, a volunteer search and rescuer, knows that people who have been lostin the wilderness, in the workplace, or in lifecan teach us how to go beyond survival and thrive, regardless of the nature of our personal wildernesses. Through his experience rescuing others and real-life stories, Hammond provides valuable lessons designed to help those who are lost. These narratives communicate that small things matter, that no one is ever lost alone, and that movement creates opportunity. Being lost is not a geographic problem, but a mental and spiritual problem. Lost people may be deprived of the basics of food, water, and shelter, but they are first deprived of meaning. Restoring that meaning is the first step toward hope, and hope is the beacon that leads you home.

The Lost Painting

The Quest for a Caravaggio Masterpiece

Author: Jonathan Harr

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588364890

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 5158

An Italian village on a hilltop near the Adriatic coast, a decaying palazzo facing the sea, and in the basement, cobwebbed and dusty, lit by a single bulb, an archive unknown to scholars. Here, a young graduate student from Rome, Francesca Cappelletti, makes a discovery that inspires a search for a work of art of incalculable value, a painting lost for almost two centuries. The artist was Caravaggio, a master of the Italian Baroque. He was a genius, a revolutionary painter, and a man beset by personal demons. Four hundred years ago, he drank and brawled in the taverns and streets of Rome, moving from one rooming house to another, constantly in and out of jail, all the while painting works of transcendent emotional and visual power. He rose from obscurity to fame and wealth, but success didn’t alter his violent temperament. His rage finally led him to commit murder, forcing him to flee Rome a hunted man. He died young, alone, and under strange circumstances. Caravaggio scholars estimate that between sixty and eighty of his works are in existence today. Many others–no one knows the precise number–have been lost to time. Somewhere, surely, a masterpiece lies forgotten in a storeroom, or in a small parish church, or hanging above a fireplace, mistaken for a mere copy. Prizewinning author Jonathan Harr embarks on an spellbinding journey to discover the long-lost painting known as The Taking of Christ–its mysterious fate and the circumstances of its disappearance have captivated Caravaggio devotees for years. After Francesca Cappelletti stumbles across a clue in that dusty archive, she tracks the painting across a continent and hundreds of years of history. But it is not until she meets Sergio Benedetti, an art restorer working in Ireland, that she finally manages to assemble all the pieces of the puzzle. Told with consummate skill by the writer of the bestselling, award-winning A Civil Action, The Lost Painting is a remarkable synthesis of history and detective story. The fascinating details of Caravaggio’s strange, turbulent career and the astonishing beauty of his work come to life in these pages. Harr’s account is not unlike a Caravaggio painting: vivid, deftly wrought, and enthralling. ". . . Jonathan Harr has gone to the trouble of writing what will probably be a bestseller . . . rich and wonderful. . .in truth, the book reads better than a thriller because, unlike a lot of best-selling nonfiction authors who write in a more or less novelistic vein (Harr's previous book, A Civil Action, was made into a John Travolta movie), Harr doesn't plump up hi tale. He almost never foreshadows, doesn't implausibly reconstruct entire conversations and rarely throws in litanies of clearly conjectured or imagined details just for color's sake. . .if you're a sucker for Rome, and for dusk. . .[you'll] enjoy Harr's more clearly reported details about life in the city, as when--one of my favorite moments in the whole book--Francesca and another young colleague try to calm their nerves before a crucial meeting with a forbidding professor by eating gelato. And who wouldn't in Italy? The pleasures of travelogue here are incidental but not inconsiderable." --The New York Times Book Review "Jonathan Harr has taken the story of the lost painting, and woven from it a deeply moving narrative about history, art and taste--and about the greed, envy, covetousness and professional jealousy of people who fall prey to obsession. It is as perfect a work of narrative nonfiction as you could ever hope to read." --The Economist From the Hardcover edition.

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart

Author: Holly Ringland

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1509859853

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 1790

Flowers, fire and fairy tales are the elements that will forever shape nine-year-old Alice Hart's life, in The Lost Flower's of Alice Hart, the international bestseller by Holly Ringland. Alice Hart lives in isolation by the sea, where her mother’s enchanting flowers and their hidden messages shelter her from the dark moods of her father. When tragedy changes her life irrevocably, nine-year-old Alice goes to live with the grandmother she never knew existed, on a native flower farm that gives refuge to women who, like Alice, are lost or broken. In the Victorian tradition, every flower has a meaning and, as she settles into her new life, Alice uses this language of flowers to say the things that are too hard to speak. As she grows older, though, family secrecy, a devastating betrayal and a man who’s not all he seems, combine to make Alice realise there are some stories that flowers alone cannot tell. If she is to have the freedom she craves, she must find the courage to possess the most powerful story she knows: her own.

Never Lost Again

The Google Mapping Revolution That Sparked New Industries and Augmented Our Reality

Author: Bill Kilday

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 006267305X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 3187

As enlightening as The Facebook Effect, Elon Musk, and Chaos Monkeys—the compelling, behind-the-scenes story of the creation of one of the most essential applications ever devised, and the rag-tag team that built it and changed how we navigate the world Never Lost Again chronicles the evolution of mapping technology—the "overnight success twenty years in the making." Bill Kilday takes us behind the scenes of the tech’s development, and introduces to the team that gave us not only Google Maps but Google Earth, and most recently, Pokémon GO. He takes us back to the beginning to Keyhole—a cash-strapped startup mapping company started by a small-town Texas boy named John Hanke, that nearly folded when the tech bubble burst. While a contract with the CIA kept them afloat, the company’s big break came with the first invasion of Iraq; CNN used their technology to cover the war and made it famous. Then Google came on the scene, buying the company and relaunching the software as Google Maps and Google Earth. Eventually, Hanke’s original company was spun back out of Google, and is now responsible for Pokémon GO and the upcoming Harry Potter: Wizards Unite. Kilday, the marketing director for Keyhole and Google Maps, was there from the earliest days, and offers a personal look behind the scenes at the tech and the minds developing it. But this book isn’t only a look back at the past; it is also a glimpse of what’s to come. Kilday reveals how emerging map-based technologies including virtual reality and driverless cars are going to upend our lives once again. Never Lost Again shows us how our worldview changed dramatically as a result of vision, imagination, and implementation. It’s a crazy story. And it all started with a really good map.

Le Grand Meaulnes

Author: Alain-Fournier

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780140182828

Category: Fiction

Page: 206

View: 1593

The Lost City of Z

A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon

Author: David Grann

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780385529228

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1251

The #1 New York Times bestseller - now a major motion picture starring Charlie Hunnam, Tom Holland, Sienna Miller and Robert Pattinson. In 1925, the legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett ventured into the Amazon jungle, in search of a fabled civilization. He never returned. Over the years countless perished trying to find evidence of his party and the place he called “The Lost City of Z.” In this masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, journalist David Grann interweaves the spellbinding stories of Fawcett’s quest for “Z” and his own journey into the deadly jungle, as he unravels the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century.

The Art of Happiness

A Handbook for Living

Author: Dalai Lama XIV Bstan-ʼdzin-rgya-mtsho,Howard C. Cutler

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781573221115

Category: Religion

Page: 322

View: 7832

Drawing on more that 2,500 years of Buddhist tradition and teaching, the spiritual leader demonstrates how to confront the negative emotions, stresses, and obstacles of everyday life in order to find the source of inner peace.

We Need to Talk

How to Have Conversations That Matter

Author: Celeste Headlee

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062669028

Category: Self-Help

Page: 272

View: 1838

“WE NEED TO TALK.” In this urgent and insightful book, public radio journalist Celeste Headlee shows us how to bridge what divides us--by having real conversations BASED ON THE TED TALK WITH OVER 10 MILLION VIEWS NPR's Best Books of 2017 Winner of the 2017 Silver Nautilus Award in Relationships & Communication “We Need to Talk is an important read for a conversationally-challenged, disconnected age. Headlee is a talented, honest storyteller, and her advice has helped me become a better spouse, friend, and mother.” (Jessica Lahey, author of New York Times bestseller The Gift of Failure) Today most of us communicate from behind electronic screens, and studies show that Americans feel less connected and more divided than ever before. The blame for some of this disconnect can be attributed to our political landscape, but the erosion of our conversational skills as a society lies with us as individuals. And the only way forward, says Headlee, is to start talking to each other. In We Need to Talk, she outlines the strategies that have made her a better conversationalist—and offers simple tools that can improve anyone’s communication. For example: BE THERE OR GO ELSEWHERE. Human beings are incapable of multitasking, and this is especially true of tasks that involve language. Think you can type up a few emails while on a business call, or hold a conversation with your child while texting your spouse? Think again. CHECK YOUR BIAS. The belief that your intelligence protects you from erroneous assumptions can end up making you more vulnerable to them. We all have blind spots that affect the way we view others. Check your bias before you judge someone else. HIDE YOUR PHONE. Don’t just put down your phone, put it away. New research suggests that the mere presence of a cell phone can negatively impact the quality of a conversation. Whether you’re struggling to communicate with your kid’s teacher at school, an employee at work, or the people you love the most—Headlee offers smart strategies that can help us all have conversations that matter.

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