Search Results: the-man-who-fed-the-world

The Man who Fed the World

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Norman Borlaug and His Battle to End World Hunger : an Authorized Biography

Author: Leon F. Hesser

Publisher: Leon Hesser

ISBN: 9781930754904

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 259

View: 5202

The Man Who Fed the World provides a loving and respectful portrait of one of America's greatest heroes. Nobel Peace Prize recipient for averting hunger and famine, Dr. Norman Borlang is credited with saving hundreds of millions of lives from starvation-more than any other person in history? Loved by millions around the world, Dr. Borlang is recognized as one of the most influential men of the twentieth century.

The Man Who Fed the World

Author: Leon Hesser

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781935764182

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 276

View: 998

Dr. Norman Borlaug, one of the world's greatest heroes, is the most highly-decorated individual of our time. He is credited with saving over a billion people from Starvation. Dr. Borlaug is only one of five people in history to win the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal.In addition, Dr. Borlaug received the Padma Vibhushan, the highest civilian award the government of India can present to a non-citizen. Winner USA Book News Best Biography of the Year. Winner American Farm Bureau Foundation of Agriculture Best Book of the Year award. Winner Florida Publishers Association Best Book Award. Winner Florida Writers Association Royal Palm Literary Award.

The Man Who Knew

The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan

Author: Sebastian Mallaby

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698170016

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 800

View: 2782

The definitive biography of the most important economic statesman of our time Sebastian Mallaby's magisterial biography of Alan Greenspan, the product of over five years of research based on untrammeled access to his subject and his closest professional and personal intimates, brings into vivid focus the mysterious point where the government and the economy meet. To understand Greenspan's story is to see the economic and political landscape of the last 30 years--and the presidency from Reagan to George W. Bush--in a whole new light. As the most influential economic statesman of his age, Greenspan spent a lifetime grappling with a momentous shift: the transformation of finance from the fixed and regulated system of the post-war era to the free-for-all of the past quarter century. The story of Greenspan is also the story of the making of modern finance, for good and for ill. Greenspan's life is a quintessential American success story: raised by a single mother in the Jewish émigré community of Washington Heights, he was a math prodigy who found a niche as a stats-crunching consultant. A master at explaining the economic weather to captains of industry, he translated that skill into advising Richard Nixon in his 1968 campaign. This led to a perch on the White House Council of Economic Advisers, and then to a dazzling array of business and government roles, from which the path to the Fed was relatively clear. A fire-breathing libertarian and disciple of Ayn Rand in his youth who once called the Fed's creation a historic mistake, Mallaby shows how Greenspan reinvented himself as a pragmatist once in power. In his analysis, and in his core mission of keeping inflation in check, he was a maestro indeed, and hailed as such. At his retirement in 2006, he was lauded as the age's necessary man, the veritable God in the machine, the global economy's avatar. His memoirs sold for record sums to publishers around the world. But then came 2008. Mallaby's story lands with both feet on the great crash which did so much to damage Alan Greenspan's reputation. Mallaby argues that the conventional wisdom is off base: Greenspan wasn't a naïve ideologue who believed greater regulation was unnecessary. He had pressed for greater regulation of some key areas of finance over the years, and had gotten nowhere. To argue that he didn't know the risks in irrational markets is to miss the point. He knew more than almost anyone; the question is why he didn't act, and whether anyone else could or would have. A close reading of Greenspan's life provides fascinating answers to these questions, answers whose lessons we would do well to heed. Because perhaps Mallaby's greatest lesson is that economic statesmanship, like political statesmanship, is the art of the possible. The Man Who Knew is a searching reckoning with what exactly comprised the art, and the possible, in the career of Alan Greenspan. From the Hardcover edition.

Starved for Science

How Biotechnology Is Being Kept Out of Africa

Author: Robert Paarlberg

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674041745

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 2709

In Starved for Science Paarlberg explains why poor African farmers are denied access to productive technologies, particularly genetically engineered seeds with improved resistance to insects and drought. He traces this obstacle to the current opposition to farm science in prosperous countries.

Lords of Finance

The Bankers Who Broke the World

Author: Liaquat Ahamed

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440697965

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 576

View: 9975

Winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize "A magisterial work...You can't help thinking about the economic crisis we're living through now." --The New York Times Book Review It is commonly believed that the Great Depression that began in 1929 resulted from a confluence of events beyond any one person's or government's control. In fact, as Liaquat Ahamed reveals, it was the decisions made by a small number of central bankers that were the primary cause of that economic meltdown, the effects of which set the stage for World War II and reverberated for decades. As yet another period of economic turmoil makes headlines today, Lords of Finance is a potent reminder of the enormous impact that the decisions of central bankers can have, their fallibility, and the terrible human consequences that can result when they are wrong. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Food 2.0

Secrets from the Chef Who Fed Google

Author: Charlie Ayers

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0756643406

Category: Cooking

Page: 256

View: 6678

“Charlie Ayers is a talented chef and once again his talent shines through in Food 2.0. The book is a great combination of foods and techniques that can help us all live a healthierlife.”— Cat Cora, author and Iron ChefIn a cutting edge cookbook for the Internet generation, Google’s legendary founding super-chef, Charlie Ayers, tells you everything you need to know about the newest nutrition buzzword: brainfood.He outlines the basics on how the right foods can transform your mind and body, and then teaches you how to stockyour kitchen with the healthiest foods available. Raw, organic, and fermented is Charlie’s mantra, which is reflected in more than 90 easy-to-prepare recipes, whether it’s a Kick-start Breakfast, a Power Lunch, or a Light, Bright Dinner. And, following the world-famous formula Charlie used at Google headquarters, the meals and snacks are designed to feed your brain exactly what it needs at different points throughout the workday. From hipsters looking to think more creatively to high-fliers who need that extra edge for success to new moms and dads, looking to repair the damage of myriad sleepless nights, Food 2.0 has the recipe for delicious food for sharper thinking no matter who you are or what you do.

We Fed an Island

The True Story of Rebuilding Puerto Rico, One Meal at a Time

Author: Jose Andres

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062864505

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 659

FOREWORD BY LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA AND LUIS A. MIRANDA, JR. The true story of how a group of chefs fed hundreds of thousands of hungry Americans after Hurricane Maria and touched the hearts of many more Chef José Andrés arrived in Puerto Rico four days after Hurricane Maria ripped through the island. The economy was destroyed and for most people there was no clean water, no food, no power, no gas, and no way to communicate with the outside world. Andrés addressed the humanitarian crisis the only way he knew how: by feeding people, one hot meal at a time. From serving sancocho with his friend José Enrique at Enrique’s ravaged restaurant in San Juan to eventually cooking 100,000 meals a day at more than a dozen kitchens across the island, Andrés and his team fed hundreds of thousands of people, including with massive paellas made to serve thousands of people alone.. At the same time, they also confronted a crisis with deep roots, as well as the broken and wasteful system that helps keep some of the biggest charities and NGOs in business. Based on Andrés’s insider’s take as well as on meetings, messages, and conversations he had while in Puerto Rico, We Fed an Island movingly describes how a network of community kitchens activated real change and tells an extraordinary story of hope in the face of disasters both natural and man-made, offering suggestions for how to address a crisis like this in the future. Beyond that, a portion of the proceeds from the book will be donated to the Chef Relief Network of World Central Kitchen for efforts in Puerto Rico and beyond.

The Man Who Couldn't Eat

Author: Jon Reiner

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439192472

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 2428

"Based on his Esquire magazine article, The man who couldn't eat is the very personal journey of Jon Reiner's struggle with chronic illness"--Provided by publisher.

Asian Godfathers

Money and Power in Hong Kong and South East Asia

Author: Joe Studwell

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847651445

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 362

View: 7389

40 or 50 families control the economies of Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, the Philippines and Indonesia. Their interests range from banking to property, from shipping to sugar, from vice to gambling. 13 of the 50 richest families in the world are in South East Asia yet they are largely unknown outside confined business circles. Often this is because they control the press and television as well as everything else. How do they do it? What are their secrets? And is it good news or bad for the places where they operate? Joe Studwell explosively lifts the lid on a world of staggering secrecy and shows that the little most people know is almost entirely wrong.

The Alchemy of Air

A Jewish Genius, a Doomed Tycoon, and the Scientific Discovery That Fed the World but Fueled the Rise of Hitler

Author: Thomas Hager

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307449993

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 2616

A sweeping history of tragic genius, cutting-edge science, and the Haber-Bosch discovery that changed billions of lives--including your own. At the dawn of the twentieth century, humanity was facing global disaster: Mass starvation was about to become a reality. A call went out to the world’ s scientists to find a solution. This is the story of the two men who found it: brilliant, self-important Fritz Haber and reclusive, alcoholic Carl Bosch. Together they discovered a way to make bread out of air, built city-sized factories, and saved millions of lives. But their epochal triumph came at a price we are still paying. The Haber-Bosch process was also used to make the gunpowder and explosives that killed millions during the two world wars. Both men were vilified during their lives; both, disillusioned and disgraced, died tragically. The Alchemy of Air is the extraordinary, previously untold story of a discovery that changed the way we grow food and the way we make war–and that promises to continue shaping our lives in fundamental and dramatic ways.

Cod

A Biography Of The Fish That Changed The World

Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 0307369803

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 5446

Wars have been fought over it, revolutions have been spurred by it, national diets have been based on it, economies have depended on it, and the settlement of North America was driven by it. Cod, it turns out, is the reason Europeans set sail across the Atlantic, and it is the only reason they could. What did the Vikings eat in icy Greenland and on the five expeditions to America recorded in the Icelandic sagas? Cod -- frozen and dried in the frosty air, then broken into pieces and eaten like hardtack. What was the staple of the medieval diet? Cod again, sold salted by the Basques, an enigmatic people with a mysterious, unlimited supply of cod. Cod is a charming tour of history with all its economic forces laid bare and a fish story embellished with great gastronomic detail. It is also a tragic tale of environmental failure, of depleted fishing stocks where once the cod's numbers were legendary. In this deceptively whimsical biography of a fish, Mark Kurlansky brings a thousand years of human civilization into captivating focus. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Nurture the Heart, Feed the World

The Inspiring Life Journeys of Two Vagabonds

Author: Leon Hesser

Publisher: BookPros, LLC

ISBN: 9780974466880

Category: Social Science

Page: 132

View: 8719

[i] Nurture the Heart, Feed the World[/i] is about positive things that America does to provide more efficient and better food and education for people in less-developed countries. The story is animated through the inspiring life adventures of Leon and Florence Hesser who worked together to enrich their own lives as well as others.

The Seeds We Sow

Kindness That Fed a Hungry World

Author: Gary Beene

Publisher: Sunstone Press

ISBN: 1611390125

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 406

View: 1752

"Practice random acts of kindness" is a catchy little phrase. It is also nonsense. There should be nothing random about the decision to be kind. There is no single action more powerful and “The Seeds We Sow” offers proof of the cross-generational power of kindness. The book tells the story of the intertwined lives of George Washington Carver, Vice President Henry Agard Wallace, and Nobel Laureate Norman E. Borlaug. It tells how their kindness and passion to feed the world was passed on and enhanced across generations. In his quest to help feed the world, George Washington Carver was probably the most influential not because he was the "peanut man," but rather because he was a "gentle man." His protégé Henry Agard Wallace grew up to be the Secretary of Agriculture and Vice President of the United States. He was likely one of the most under-appreciated and misunderstood leaders of the twentieth century. In turn, Wallace passed the baton to Norman Borlaug, who worked in quiet obscurity for most of his life. M.S. Swaminathan of India summed up his friend's life, "Norman Borlaug is the living embodiment of the human quest for a hunger free world. His life is his message." Because Carver, Wallace and Borlaug lived, so do we. After a 30 year career in Vocational Rehabilitation and Special Education, GARY BEENE retired as the state director of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in September 2008. He and his wife, Carla, enjoy life at their home in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Gary states that for him kindness did not always come naturally. He says, “I was one of those poor saps who had to do a lot of personal work before understanding that only the merest quarter-turn of the heart separates us from life's abundance.”

The Man Who Planted Trees

Author: Jean Giono,Michael McCurdy

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1933392819

Category: Fiction

Page: 61

View: 5586

Twenty years ago Chelsea Green published the first trade edition of The Man Who Planted Trees, a timeless eco-fable about what one person can do to restore the earth. The hero of the story, Elzéard Bouffier, spent his life planting one hundred acorns a day in a desolate, barren section of Provence in the south of France. The result was a total transformation of the landscape-from one devoid of life, with miserable, contentious inhabitants, to one filled with the scent of flowers, the songs of birds, and fresh, flowing water. Since our first publication, the book has sold over a quarter of a million copies and inspired countless numbers of people around the world to take action and plant trees. On National Arbor Day, April 29, 2005, Chelsea Green released a special twentieth anniversary edition with a new foreword by Wangari Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize and founder of the African Green Belt Movement.

The Man Who Invented Fiction

How Cervantes Ushered in the Modern World

Author: William Egginton

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1620401762

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 9508

In the early seventeenth century, a crippled, graying, almost toothless veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman, his brain addled from reading too many books of chivalry, who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. That book, Don Quixote, went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the Bible, making its author, Miguel de Cervantes, the single most-read author in human history. Cervantes did more than just publish a bestseller, though. He invented a way of writing. This book is about how Cervantes came to create what we now call fiction, and how fiction changed the world. The Man Who Invented Fiction explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, showing how his influences converged in his work, and how his work--especially Don Quixote--radically changed the nature of literature and created a new way of viewing the world. Finally, it explains how that worldview went on to infiltrate art, politics, and science, and how the world today would be unimaginable without it. William Egginton has brought thrilling new meaning to an immortal novel.

Epic Measures

One Doctor. Seven Billion Patients.

Author: Jeremy N. Smith

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062237527

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 352

View: 8899

Moneyball meets medicine in this remarkable chronicle of one of the greatest scientific quests of our time—the groundbreaking program to answer the most essential question for humanity: how do we live and die?—and the visionary mastermind behind it. Medical doctor and economist Christopher Murray began the Global Burden of Disease studies to gain a truer understanding of how we live and how we die. While it is one of the largest scientific projects ever attempted—as breathtaking as the first moon landing or the Human Genome Project—the questions it answers are meaningful for every one of us: What are the world’s health problems? Who do they hurt? How much? Where? Why? Murray argues that the ideal existence isn’t simply the longest but the one lived well and with the least illness. Until we can accurately measure how people live and die, we cannot understand what makes us sick or do much to improve it. Challenging the accepted wisdom of the WHO and the UN, the charismatic and controversial health maverick has made enemies—and some influential friends, including Bill Gates who gave Murray a $100 million grant. In Epic Measures, journalist Jeremy N. Smith offers an intimate look at Murray and his groundbreaking work. From ranking countries’ healthcare systems (the U.S. is 37th) to unearthing the shocking reality that world governments are funding developing countries at only 30% of the potential maximum efficiency when it comes to health, Epic Measures introduces a visionary leader whose unwavering determination to improve global health standards has already changed the way the world addresses issues of health and wellness, sets policy, and distributes funding.

The Man Who Fed the World

Author: Hesser Hesser

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780981848662

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 278

View: 4611

Hesser profiles Dr. Norman Borlaug, who is credited with saving more than a billion people from starvation, and is only one of five people in history to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the Congressional Gold Medal.

The Man Who Closed the Asylums

Franco Basaglia and the Revolution in Mental Health Care

Author: John Foot

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1781689288

Category: Political Science

Page: 424

View: 3181

When the wind of the 1960s blew through the world of psychiatry In 1961, when Franco Basaglia arrived outside the grim walls of the Gorizia asylum, on the Italian border with Yugoslavia, it was a place of horror, a Bedlam for the mentally sick and excluded, redolent of Basaglia’s own wartime experience inside a fascist gaol. Patients were frequently restrained for long periods, and therapy was largely a matter of electric and insulin shocks. The corridors stank, and for many of the interned the doors were locked for life. This was a concentration camp, not a hospital. Basaglia, the new Director, was expected to practise all the skills of oppression in which he had been schooled, but he would have none of this. The place had to be closed down by opening it up from the inside, bringing freedom and democracy to the patients, the nurses and the psychiatrists working in that “total institution.” Inspired by the writings of authors such as Primo Levi, R.D. Laing, Erving Goffman, Michel Foucault and Frantz Fanon, and the practices of experimental therapeutic communities in the UK, Basaglia’s seminal work as a psychiatrist and campaigner in Gorizia, Parma and Trieste fed into and substantially contributed to the national and international movement of 1968. In 1978 a law was passed (the “Basaglia law”) which sanctioned the closure of the entire Italian asylum system. The first comprehensive study of this revolutionary approach to mental health care, The Man Who Closed the Asylums is a gripping account of one of the most influential movements in twentieth-century psychiatry, which helped to transform the way we see mental illness. Basaglia’s work saved countless people from a miserable existence, and his legacy persists, as an object lesson in the struggle against the brutality and ignorance that the establishment peddles to the public as common sense. From the Hardcover edition.

Inferior

How Science Got Women Wrong - and the New Research That's Rewriting the Story

Author: Angela Saini

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807071706

Category: SCIENCE

Page: 213

View: 2188

For hundreds of years it was common sense: women were the inferior sex. Their bodies were weaker, their minds feebler, their role subservient. Science has continued to tell us that men and women are fundamentally different. But a huge wave of research is now revealing that women are as strong, powerful, strategic, and smart as anyone else. Saini takes readers on a journey to uncover science's failure to understand women and to show how women's bodies and minds are finally being rediscovered.

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