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The New Deal

Depression Years, 1933-40

Author: A.J. Badger

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 940

This is a study of recent case studies of the New Deal which assesses the impact of the depression and New Deal programmes on businessmen, industrial workers and the unemployed. It explains the political and ideological constraints which limited the changes wrought by the New Deal.

The New Deal

The Depression Years, 1933-1940

Author: Anthony J. Badger

Publisher: Hill & Wang

ISBN:

Category: New Deal, 1933-1939

Page: 392

View: 638

This notably successful history is not simply another narrative of the New Deal. The author considers important aspects of New Deal activity and explores the major problems in interpreting the history of each.

Visions of Progress

The Left-Liberal Tradition in America

Author: Doug Rossinow

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 417

Liberals and leftists in the United States have not always been estranged from one another as they are today. Historian Doug Rossinow examines how the cooperation and the creative tension between left-wing radicals and liberal reformers advanced many of the most important political values of the twentieth century, including free speech, freedom of conscience, and racial equality. Visions of Progress chronicles the broad alliances of radical and liberal figures who were driven by a particular concept of social progress—a transformative vision in which the country would become not simply wealthier or a bit fairer but fundamentally more democratic, just, and united. Believers in this vision—from the settlement-house pioneer Jane Addams and the civil rights leader W. E. B. Du Bois in the 1890s and after, to the founders of the ACLU in the 1920s, to Minnesota Governor Floyd Olson and assorted labor-union radicals in the 1930s, to New Dealer Henry Wallace in the 1940s—belonged to a left-liberal tradition in America. They helped push political leaders, including Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, and Harry Truman, toward reforms that made the goals of opportunity and security real for ever more Americans. Yet, during the Cold War era of the 1950s and '60s, leftists and liberals came to view one another as enemies, and their influential alliance all but vanished. Visions of Progress revisits the period between the 1880s and the 1940s, when reformers and radicals worked together along a middle path between the revolutionary left and establishment liberalism. Rossinow takes the story up to the present, showing how the progressive connection was lost and explaining the consequences that followed. This book introduces today's progressives to their historical predecessors, while offering an ambitious reinterpretation of issues in American political history.

e-Study Guide for: Give Me Liberty!: An American History, Vol. 2 by Eric Foner, ISBN 9780393911916

Author: Cram101 Textbook Reviews

Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 123

View: 252

Never Highlight a Book Again! Just the FACTS101 study guides give the student the textbook outlines, highlights, practice quizzes and optional access to the full practice tests for their textbook.

Down and Out in the Great Depression

Letters from the Forgotten Man

Author: Robert S. McElvaine

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 901

Down and Out in the Great Depression is a moving, revealing collection of letters by the forgotten men, women, and children who suffered through one of the greatest periods of hardship in American history. Sifting through some 15,000 letters from government and private sources, Robert McElvaine has culled nearly 200 communications that best show the problems, thoughts, and emotions of ordinary people during this time. Unlike views of Depression life "from the bottom up" that rely on recollections recorded several decades later, this book captures the daily anguish of people during the thirties. It puts the reader in direct contact with Depression victims, evoking a feeling of what it was like to live through this disaster. Following Franklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration, both the number of letters received by the White House and the percentage of them coming from the poor were unprecedented. The average number of daily communications jumped to between 5,000 and 8,000, a trend that continued throughout the Rosevelt administration. The White House staff for answering such letters--most of which were directed to FDR, Eleanor Roosevelt, or Harry Hopkins--quickly grew from one person to fifty. Mainly because of his radio talks, many felt they knew the president personally and could confide in him. They viewed the Roosevelts as parent figures, offering solace, help, and protection. Roosevelt himself valued the letters, perceiving them as a way to gauge public sentiment. The writers came from a number of different groups--middle-class people, blacks, rural residents, the elderly, and children. Their letters display emotional reactions to the Depression--despair, cynicism, and anger--and attitudes toward relief. In his extensive introduction, McElvaine sets the stage for the letters, discussing their significance and some of the themes that emerge from them. By preserving their original spelling, syntax, grammar, and capitalization, he conveys their full flavor. The Depression was far more than an economic collapse. It was the major personal event in the lives of tens of millions of Americans. McElvaine shows that, contrary to popular belief, many sufferers were not passive victims of history. Rather, he says, they were "also actors and, to an extent, playwrights, producers, and directors as well," taking an active role in trying to deal with their plight and solve their problems. For this twenty-fifth anniversary edition, McElvaine provides a new foreword recounting the history of the book, its impact on the historiography of the Depression, and its continued importance today.

Nature's New Deal

The Civilian Conservation Corps and the Roots of the American Environmental Movement

Author: Neil M. Maher

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 660

Neil M. Maher examines the history of one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's boldest and most successful experiments, the Civilian Conservation Corps, describing it as a turning point both in national politics and in the emergence of modern environmentalism.

The encyclopedia of American political history

Author: Paul Finkelman

Publisher: Cq Pr

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 494

View: 525

The Encyclopedia of American Political History is the perfect single-volume source for students, researchers, and scholars at all levels seeking an accessible, easy-to-navigate reference on the forces that have shaped--and continue to shape--American history. Particularly helpful to anyone hoping to understand the evolution and intricacies of the modern American political process, this key reference identifies the most significant personalities, trends, campaigns and elections, protests, and rebellions, laws, statutes, and policies in American political history.

The New Deal: The national level

Author: John Braeman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 235

Liberty Equality Power

A History of the American People Concise/ Infotrac

Author: John M. Murrin

Publisher: Wadsworth Pub Co

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 804

LIBERTY, EQUALITY, POWER: A HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, CONCISE EDITION provides students with a clear understanding of how power is gained, lost, and used in both public and private life. This concise version retains the clarity, coverage, and thematic unity of the larger text, while offering unmatched integration of social and cultural history into a political story. It retains the strong chronological and thematic framework of the bigger text, but offers a more manageable option for instructors concerned about too much material and too little time.

The enduring vision

a history of the American people, 1890s-present

Author: Paul S. Boyer

Publisher: D.C. Heath

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 673

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