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The Politics of Diplomacy

Revolution, War, and Peace, 1989-1992

Author: James Addison Baker

Publisher: Putnam Adult

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 687

View: 656

The Secretary of State for the Bush administration recounts his efforts at diplomacy during his time in office, from the fall of the U.S.S.R. to the Israeli-Palestinian peace accord

Routledge Handbook of Diplomacy and Statecraft

Author: B.J.C. McKercher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 524

View: 340

Despite post-Cold War arguments about their demise, ‘Great Powers’ not only continue to thrive, with lesser Powers they form the basis of the constellation of global politics. This topical new Handbook illustrates how and why the new international order has evolved – and is still evolving – since the end of the Cold War, through the application of diplomacy and statecraft. Including cutting edge contributions from over 40 scholars, the handbook is structured around seven sections: Context of Diplomacy Great Powers Middle Powers Developing Powers International Organisations and Military Alliances International Economy Issues of Conflict and Co-operation Through analysis of a wide range of case studies, the Handbook assesses the diplomacy and statecraft of individual powers, offering insights into how they function, their individual perception of national interests and the roles they play in modern statecraft. The contributors also seek to evaluate the organizations and contemporary issues that continue to influence the shaping of the new international order. A comprehensive survey of diplomacy across the world, this work will be essential reading for scholars and professionals alike.

Realizing Peace

A Constructive Conflict Approach

Author: Louis Kriesberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 397

View: 867

"Realizing Peace combines three bodies of work that have not previously been integrated. First, it critically examines major episodes of U.S. government engagements in foreign conflicts since the beginning of the Cold War. This includes American engagements in struggles against adversaries, interventions among adversaries, and mediations between adversaries. Second, Realizing Peace also examines the efforts of non-governmental organizations and non-official individuals in advancing peace in foreign conflicts. Third, it traces and applies the developing fields of peace studies and conflict resolution, synthesized in the constructive conflict approach, to evaluate those American engagements. Using the constructive conflict approach, the book draws on its insights and research findings to make critical assessments of American engagements. Realizing Peace suggests alternative strategies that would be more effective and yield more beneficial results than did many of the strategies that had been pursued. A major set of episodes discussed in this book pertain to Americans' engagements in the Cold War, through its escalations and de-escalations, its final transformation, and subsequent American-Russian interactions. Multiple analyses also relate to conflicts with Panama, Al Qaeda, Iraq, North Korea, and Iran. In addition, interventions in Yugoslavia, Haiti, and elsewhere are examined. Finally, several mediation efforts in the Israeli-Arab/Palestinian conflicts are critically discussed. The analyses incorporate consideration of the American political circumstances and the evolving global context"--

The Encyclopedia of the Arab-Israeli Conflict: A Political, Social, and Military History [4 volumes]

A Political, Social, and Military History

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1553

View: 787

This exhaustive work offers readers at multiple levels key insights into the military, political, social, cultural, and religious origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict. • With more than 750 alphabetically organized entries covering everything from important people, places, and events to a wide range of social and cultural topics—each entry featuring cross references and suggestions for further reading • A separate documents volume offering an unprecedented collection of more than 150 essential primary sources • Over 500 images, including maps, photographs, and illustrations • A comprehensive introductory overview by retired general Anthony Zinni

The Triumph of Improvisation

Gorbachev's Adaptability, Reagan's Engagement, and the End of the Cold War

Author: James Graham Wilson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 654

In The Triumph of Improvisation, James Graham Wilson takes a long view of the end of the Cold War, from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979 to Operation Desert Storm in January 1991. Drawing on deep archival research and recently declassified papers, Wilson argues that adaptation, improvisation, and engagement by individuals in positions of power ended the specter of a nuclear holocaust. Amid ambivalence and uncertainty, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, George Shultz, George H. W. Bush, and a host of other actors engaged with adversaries and adapted to a rapidly changing international environment and information age in which global capitalism recovered as command economies failed. Eschewing the notion of a coherent grand strategy to end the Cold War, Wilson paints a vivid portrait of how leaders made choices; some made poor choices while others reacted prudently, imaginatively, and courageously to events they did not foresee. A book about the burdens of responsibility, the obstacles of domestic politics, and the human qualities of leadership, The Triumph of Improvisation concludes with a chapter describing how George H. W. Bush oversaw the construction of a new configuration of power after the fall of the Berlin Wall, one that resolved the fundamental components of the Cold War on Washington's terms.

Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy

Iraq, 9/11, and Misguided Reform

Author: Paul R. Pillar

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 644

A career of nearly three decades with the CIA and the National Intelligence Council showed Paul R. Pillar that intelligence reforms, especially measures enacted since 9/11, can be deeply misguided. They often miss the sources that underwrite failed policy and misperceive our ability to read outside influences. They also misconceive the intelligence-policy relationship and promote changes that weaken intelligence-gathering operations. In this book, Pillar confronts the intelligence myths Americans have come to rely on to explain national tragedies, including the belief that intelligence drives major national security decisions and can be fixed to avoid future failures. Pillar believes these assumptions waste critical resources and create harmful policies, diverting attention away from smarter reform, and they keep Americans from recognizing the limits of obtainable knowledge. Pillar revisits U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War and highlights the small role intelligence played in those decisions, and he demonstrates the negligible effect that America's most notorious intelligence failures had on U.S. policy and interests. He then reviews in detail the events of 9/11 and the 2003 invasion of Iraq, condemning the 9/11 commission and the George W. Bush administration for their portrayals of the role of intelligence. Pillar offers an original approach to better informing U.S. policy, which involves insulating intelligence management from politicization and reducing the politically appointed layer in the executive branch to combat slanted perceptions of foreign threats. Pillar concludes with principles for adapting foreign policy to inevitable uncertainties.

The Demilitarization of American Diplomacy

Two Cheers for Striped Pants

Author: L. Pope

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 83

View: 583

Laurence Pope describes the contemporary dysfunction of the State Department and its Foreign Service. He contends that in the information age diplomacy is more important than ever, and that, as President Obama has stressed, without a "change of thinking" the U.S. may be drawn into more wars it does not need to fight.

The Emergency State

America's Pursuit of Absolute Security at All Costs

Author: David C. Unger

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 153

Editor’s Choice, NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW “Ambitious and valuable” --WASHINGTON POST America is trapped in a state of war that has consumed our national life since before Pearl Harbor. Over seven decades and several bloody wars, Democratic and Republican politicians alike have assembled an increasing complicated—and increasingly ineffective—network of security services. Trillions of tax dollars have been diverted from essential domestic needs while the Pentagon created a worldwide web of military bases, inventing new American security interests where none previously existed. Yet this pursuit has not only damaged our democratic institutions and undermined our economic strength—it has fundamentally failed to make us safer. In The Emergency State, senior New York Times journalist David C. Unger reveals the hidden costs of America’s obsessive pursuit of absolute national security, showing how this narrow-minded emphasis on security came to distort our political life. Unger reminds us that in the first 150 years of the American republic the U.S. valued limited military intervention abroad, along with the checks and balances put in place by the founding fathers. Yet American history took a sharp turn during and just after World War II, when we began building a vast and cumbersome complex of national security institutions and beliefs. Originally designed to wage hot war against Germany and cold war against the Soviet Union, our security bureaucracy has become remarkably ineffective at confronting the elusive, non-state sponsored threats we now face. The Emergency State traces a series of missed opportunities—from the end of World War II to the election of Barack Obama—when we could have paused to rethink our defense strategy and didn’t. We have ultimately failed to dismantle our outdated national security state because both parties are equally responsible for its expansion. While countless books have exposed the damage wrought by George W. Bush's "war on terror," Unger shows it was only the natural culmination of decades of bipartisan emergency state logic—and argues that Obama, along with many previous Democratic presidents, has failed to shift course in any meaningful way. The Emergency State: America’s Pursuit of Absolute Security At All Costs reveals the depth of folly into which we’ve fallen, as Americans eagerly trade away the country’s greatest strengths for a fleeting illusion of safety. Provocative, insightful, and refreshingly nonpartisan, The Emergency State is the definitive untold story of how America became this vulnerable—and how it can build true security again.

International Prosecutors

Author: Luc Reydams

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 1032

View: 969

This volume examines the prosecution as an institution and a function in a dozen international and hybrid criminal tribunals, from Nuremberg to the International Criminal Court. It is the result of a sustained collaborative effort among some twenty scholars and (former) tribunal staffers. The starting point is that the prosecution shapes a tribunal's practice and legacy more than any other organ and that a systematic examination of international prosecutors is therefore warranted. The chapters are organized chronologically, according to the successive phases of the life of the institution and the various stages of the trials. The analysis includes each institution's establishment, mandate and jurisdiction, as well as the prosecutorial framework and strategy, the prosecutor's external relations and the completion of the institution's work. The book also considers the prosecutors' independence and impartiality, and their accountability for their decisions. The volume thus provides a comprehensive picture of the mandate, organization, and operation of the prosecution in international criminal trials. As the first comprehensive study of an international legal actor whose decisions have widespread political repercussions, this book will be essential reading for all with an interest in international criminal justice.

The Decline and Fall of the United States Information Agency

American Public Diplomacy, 1989–2001

Author: Nicholas J. Cull

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 257

View: 984

Using newly declassified archives and interviews with practitioners, Nicholas J. Cull has pieced together the story of the final decade in the life of the United States Information Agency, revealing the decisions and actions that brought the United States' apparatus for public diplomacy into disarray.

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