Search Results: the-shame-of-the-nation-the-restoration-of-apartheid-schooling-in-america

The Shame of the Nation

The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 1400052459

Category: Education

Page: 423

View: 3139

An analysis of urban education argues that conditions have worsened for inner-city children, looking at how liberal education is being replaced by high-stakes testing procedures, culturally barren and robotic methods of instruction, and harsh discipline.

The Shame of the Nation

The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307339416

Category: Education

Page: 416

View: 1525

“The nation needs to be confronted with the crime that we’re committing and the promises we are betraying. This is a book about betrayal of the young, who have no power to defend themselves. It is not intended to make readers comfortable.” Over the past several years, Jonathan Kozol has visited nearly 60 public schools. Virtually everywhere, he finds that conditions have grown worse for inner-city children in the 15 years since federal courts began dismantling the landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. First, a state of nearly absolute apartheid now prevails in thousands of our schools. The segregation of black children has reverted to a level that the nation has not seen since 1968. Few of the students in these schools know white children any longer. Second, a protomilitary form of discipline has now emerged, modeled on stick-and-carrot methods of behavioral control traditionally used in prisons but targeted exclusively at black and Hispanic children. And third, as high-stakes testing takes on pathological and punitive dimensions, liberal education in our inner-city schools has been increasingly replaced by culturally barren and robotic methods of instruction that would be rejected out of hand by schools that serve the mainstream of society. Filled with the passionate voices of children and their teachers and some of the most revered and trusted leaders in the black community, The Shame of the Nation is a triumph of firsthand reporting that pays tribute to those undefeated educators who persist against the odds, but directly challenges the chilling practices now being forced upon our urban systems by the Bush administration. In their place, Kozol offers a humane, dramatic challenge to our nation to fulfill at last the promise made some 50 years ago to all our youngest citizens. From The Shame of the Nation “I went to Washington to challenge the soft bigotry of low expectations,” the president said in his campaign for reelection in September 2004. “It’s working. It’s making a difference.” It is one of those deadly lies, which, by sheer repetition, is at length accepted by large numbers of Americans as, perhaps, a rough approximation of the truth. But it is not the truth, and it is not an innocent misstatement of the facts. It is a devious appeasement of the heartache of the parents of the poor and, if it is not forcefully resisted and denounced, it is going to lead our nation even further in a perilous direction. Also available as a Random House AudioBook and an eBook From the Hardcover edition.

The Shame of the Nation

The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 404

View: 9142

An analysis of urban education argues that conditions have worsened for inner-city children, looking at how liberal education is being replaced by high-stakes testing procedures, culturally barren and robotic methods of instruction, and harsh discipline.

Savage Inequalities

Children in America's Schools

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0770436668

Category: Education

Page: 336

View: 6289

For two years, beginning in 1988, Jonathan Kozol visited schools in neighborhoods across the country, from Illinois to Washington D.C., and from New York to San Antonio. He spoke with teachers, principals, superintendents, and, most important, children. What he found was devastating. Not only were schools for rich and poor blatantly unequal, the gulf between the two extremes was widening—and it has widened since. The urban schools he visited were overcrowded and understaffed, and lacked the basic elements of learning—including books and, all too often, classrooms for the students. In Savage Inequalities, Kozol delivers a searing examination of the extremes of wealth and poverty and calls into question the reality of equal opportunity in our nation’s schools.

Illiterate America

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: 0307800571

Category: Education

Page: 270

View: 5976

It is startling and it is shaming: in a country that prides itself on being among the most enlightened in the world, 25 million American adults cannot read the poison warnings on a can of pesticide, a letter from their child’s teacher, or the front page of a newspaper. An additional 35 million read below the level needed to function successfully in our society. The United States ranks forty-ninth among 158 member nations of the UN in literacy, and wastes over $100 billion annually as a result. The problem is not merely an embarrassment, it is a social and economic disaster. In Illiterate America, Jonathan Kozol, author of National Book Award-winning Death at an Early Age, addresses this national disgrace. Combining hard statistics and heartrending stories, he describes the economic and the human costs of illiteracy. Kozol analyses and condemns previous government action—and inaction—and, in a passionate call for reform, he proposes a specific program to conquer illiteracy. One out of every three American adults cannot read this book—which is why everyone else must.

Fire in the Ashes

Twenty-Five Years Among the Poorest Children in America

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1400052475

Category: Social Science

Page: 354

View: 1772

The author of the National Book Award-winning Rachel and Her Children and Amazing Grace continues the personal journeys of inner-city youths who have struggled to work through formidable racial and economic inequalities while approaching adulthood. 60,000 first printing.

Letters to a Young Teacher

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307393720

Category: Education

Page: 288

View: 2003

The author shared personal reflections, anecdotes, wisdom, and guidance in his letters to Francesca, a first-year teacher, as he attempted to help her deal with the challenges she faced and encouraged her to do her best.

Making a Difference in Urban Schools

Ideas, Politics, and Pedagogy

Author: Jane Gaskell,Benjamin Levin

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442663421

Category: Education

Page: 232

View: 1605

What can be done to improve the educational experiences of students who live in cities with increasingly high levels of diversity and inequality? Making a Difference in Urban Schools evaluates how school and community leaders have worked to change urban education in Canada for the better over the past fifty years. This analytic and comparative study traces the evolution of urban education in Toronto and Winnipeg from the 1960s onward. Jane Gaskell and Ben Levin identify important contrasts between the experiences in each city as a result of their different demographics, institutional structures, cultures, and politics. They also highlight the common issues and dilemmas faced by reformers in these two cities, across Canada, and globally – including many that persist and remain controversial to this day.

The Theft of Memory

Losing My Father, One Day at a Time

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0804140987

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 5553

A Library Journal Best Book of 2015 National Book Award winner Jonathan Kozol is best known for his fifty years of work among our nation’s poorest and most vulnerable children. Now, in the most personal book of his career, he tells the story of his father’s life and work as a nationally noted specialist in disorders of the brain and his astonishing ability, at the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, to explain the causes of his sickness and then to narrate, step-by-step, his slow descent into dementia. Dr. Harry Kozol was born in Boston in 1906. Classically trained at Harvard and Johns Hopkins, he was an unusually intuitive clinician with a special gift for diagnosing interwoven elements of neurological and psychiatric illnesses in highly complicated and creative people. “One of the most intense relationships of his career,” his son recalls, “was with Eugene O’Neill, who moved to Boston in the last years of his life so my father could examine him and talk with him almost every day.” At a later stage in his career, he evaluated criminal defendants including Patricia Hearst and the Boston Strangler, Albert H. DeSalvo, who described to him in detail what was going through his mind while he was killing thirteen women. But The Theft of Memory is not primarily about a doctor’s public life. The heart of the book lies in the bond between a father and his son and the ways that bond intensified even as Harry’s verbal skills and cogency progressively abandoned him. “Somehow,” the author says, “all those hours that we spent trying to fathom something that he wanted to express, or summon up a vivid piece of seemingly lost memory that still brought a smile to his eyes, left me with a deeper sense of intimate connection with my father than I’d ever felt before.” Lyrical and stirring, The Theft of Memory is at once a tender tribute to a father from his son and a richly colored portrait of a devoted doctor who lived more than a century. From the Hardcover edition.

The Death and Life of the Great American School System

How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education

Author: Diane Ravitch

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465097995

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 2950

A passionate plea to preserve and renew public education, The Death and Life of the Great American School System is a radical change of heart from one of America’s best-known education experts. Diane Ravitch—former assistant secretary of education and a leader in the drive to create a national curriculum—examines her career in education reform and repudiates positions that she once staunchly advocated. Drawing on over forty years of research and experience, Ravitch critiques today’s most popular ideas for restructuring schools, including privatization, standardized testing, punitive accountability, and the feckless multiplication of charter schools. She shows conclusively why the business model is not an appropriate way to improve schools. Using examples from major cities like New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver, and San Diego, Ravitch makes the case that public education today is in peril. Ravitch includes clear prescriptions for improving America’s schools: leave decisions about schools to educators, not politicians or businessmen devise a truly national curriculum that sets out what children in every grade should be learning expect charter schools to educate the kids who need help the most, not to compete with public schools pay teachers a fair wage for their work, not “merit pay” based on deeply flawed and unreliable test scores encourage family involvement in education from an early age The Death and Life of the Great American School System is more than just an analysis of the state of play of the American education system. It is a must-read for any stakeholder in the future of American schooling.

Ordinary Resurrections

Children in the Years of Hope

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 077043567X

Category: Religion

Page: 397

View: 7309

The author offers his personal take on America's poverty-stricken urban neighborhoods, recalling the lessons he has learned from time spent among the nation's poorest people.

Reign of Error

The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools

Author: Diane Ravitch

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385350899

Category: Education

Page: 416

View: 2883

From one of the foremost authorities on education in the United States, former U.S. assistant secretary of education, “whistle-blower extraordinaire” (The Wall Street Journal), author of the best-selling The Death and Life of the Great American School System (“Important and riveting”—Library Journal), The Language Police (“Impassioned . . . Fiercely argued . . . Every bit as alarming as it is illuminating”—The New York Times), and other notable books on education history and policy—an incisive, comprehensive look at today’s American school system that argues against those who claim it is broken and beyond repair; an impassioned but reasoned call to stop the privatization movement that is draining students and funding from our public schools. ​In Reign of Error, Diane Ravitch argues that the crisis in American education is not a crisis of academic achievement but a concerted effort to destroy public schools in this country. She makes clear that, contrary to the claims being made, public school test scores and graduation rates are the highest they’ve ever been, and dropout rates are at their lowest point. ​She argues that federal programs such as George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind and Barack Obama’s Race to the Top set unreasonable targets for American students, punish schools, and result in teachers being fired if their students underperform, unfairly branding those educators as failures. She warns that major foundations, individual billionaires, and Wall Street hedge fund managers are encouraging the privatization of public education, some for idealistic reasons, others for profit. Many who work with equity funds are eyeing public education as an emerging market for investors. ​Reign of Error begins where The Death and Life of the Great American School System left off, providing a deeper argument against privatization and for public education, and in a chapter-by-chapter breakdown, putting forth a plan for what can be done to preserve and improve it. She makes clear what is right about U.S. education, how policy makers are failing to address the root causes of educational failure, and how we can fix it. ​For Ravitch, public school education is about knowledge, about learning, about developing character, and about creating citizens for our society. It’s about helping to inspire independent thinkers, not just honing job skills or preparing people for college. Public school education is essential to our democracy, and its aim, since the founding of this country, has been to educate citizens who will help carry democracy into the future.

Another Kind of Public Education

Race, Schools, the Media, and Democratic Possibilities

Author: Patricia Hill Collins

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807000182

Category: Education

Page: 236

View: 6407

In this fiercely intelligent yet accessible book, one of the nation's leading sociologists and experts on race calls for "another kind of public education"--one that opens up more possibilities for democracy, and more powerful modes of participation for young people of color.

Death at an Early Age

The Destruction of the Hearts and Minds of Negro Children in the Boston Public Schools

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781439513705

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 5828

A young teacher offers a firsthand account of the destructive effects of segregated Boston schools and their teachers on the African American children who attend them

Amazing Grace

The Lives of Children and the Conscience of a Nation

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0770435661

Category: Political Science

Page: 318

View: 5616

A profile of impoverished children in Mott Haven, South Bronx, reveals the human realities of their difficult lives and poses critical questions about the value of such children to an unsupportive nation. 125,000 first printing. Tour.

Tearing Down the Gates

Confronting the Class Divide in American Education

Author: Peter Sacks

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520261690

Category: Education

Page: 376

View: 1550

A compelling critique of the American educational system explains how the growing inequities between rich and poor is exacerbated by offering the advantaged ample opportunites while shutting out the poor, arguing that we need to take a hard look at the implications of equal opportunity in America today.

Injustice (revised Edition)

Why Social Inequality Still Persists

Author: Daniel Dorling,Dorling, Danny

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447320751

Category: Political Science

Page: 473

View: 8202

In the five years since the first edition of Danny Dorling's Injustice was published, poverty, hunger, and destitution have increased dramatically in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Globally, the richest 1% have never held a greater share of world wealth, while the share held by most of the other 99% has collapsed, with more and more people in debt, especially the young. And as long as we tolerate the injustices that underpin this inequality, it will persist and, terrifyingly, continue to grow. This fully rewritten and updated edition of Dorling's approachable yet authoritative, hard-hitting, and uncompromising book revisits his claim that the five social evils identified by Beveridge at the dawn of the British welfare state (ignorance, want, idleness, squalor, and disease) are being replaced by five new tenets of injustice: elitism is efficient; exclusion is necessary; prejudice is natural; greed is good; and despair is inevitable. By showing these beliefs are unfounded, Dorling offers hope of a more equal society even in these most remarkable and dangerous times. With every year that passes, it is more evident that Dorling's call to action is essential reading for anyone concerned with social justice.

The Night Is Dark and I Am Far from Home

Author: Jonathan Kozol

Publisher: Touchstone Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 269

View: 8920

Kozol, author of Rachel and Her Children: Homeless Families in America, offers an absorbing analysis of the ethical crisis confronting our culture. In this fourth edition, a new introduction and epilogue place the book in the context of contemporary issues and attitudes.

The American School

From the Puritans to the Trump Era

Author: Joel Spring

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351383574

Category: Education

Page: 522

View: 8319

This current, comprehensive history of American education is designed to stimulate critical analysis and critical thinking by offering alternative interpretations of each historical period. In his signature straight-forward, concise style, Joel Spring provides a variety of interpretations of American schooling, from conservative to leftist, in order to spark the reader’s own critical thinking about history and schools. This tenth edition follows the history of American education from the seventeenth century to the integration into global capitalism of the twenty-first century to the tumultuous current political landscape. In particular, the updates focus on tracing the direct religious links between the colonial Puritans and the current-day Trump administration. Chapters 1 and 2 have been rewritten to take a closer look at religious traditions in American schools, leading up to the educational ideas of the current U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. An updated Chapter 15 further links traditional religious fundamentalist ideas and the twentieth century free market arguments of the Chicago school of economists to President Trump’s administration and the influence of the Alt-Right.

The Children in Room E4

American Education on Trial

Author: Susan Eaton

Publisher: Algonquin Books

ISBN: 9781565126176

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 6713

Explores the racial and economic divide found in the educational systems of urban areas across the United States, in an account that follows the struggles of one bright third-grader from Hartford, Connecticut, and his indomitable teacher. Reprint.

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