Search Results: the-social-life-of-politics-ethics-kinship-and-union-activism-in-argentina

The Social Life of Politics

Ethics, Kinship, and Union Activism in Argentina

Author: Sian Lazar

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 1503602427

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 8032

A central motor of Argentine historical and political development since the early twentieth century, unions have been the site of active citizenship in both political participation and the distribution of social, economic, political, and cultural rights. What brings activists to Argentine unions and what gives these unions their remarkable strength? The Social Life of Politics examines the intimate, personal, and family dimensions of two political activist groups: the Union of National Civil Servants (UPCN) and the Association of State Workers (ATE). These two unions represent distinct political orientations within Argentina's broad, vibrant labor movement: the UPCN identifies as predominantly Peronist, disciplined, and supportive of incumbent government, while the ATE prides itself on its democratic, horizontal approach and relative autonomy from the electoral process. Sian Lazar examines how activists in both unions create themselves as particular kinds of militants and forms of political community. The Social Life of Politics places the lived experience of political activism into historical relief and shows how ethics and family values deeply inform the process by which political actors are formed, understood, and joined together through collectivism.

El Alto, Rebel City

Self and Citizenship in Andean Bolivia

Author: Sian Lazar

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822341543

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 5882

El Alto, Rebel City combines ethnography and political theory to explore the astonishing political power exercised by the indigenous citizens of El Alto, Bolivia in the past decade.

Where Are The Unions?

Workers and Social Movements in Latin America, the Middle East and Europe

Author: Doctor Sian Lazar

Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.

ISBN: 1783609915

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 8257

The start of the twenty-first century has been marked by global demands for economic justice. From the pink tide and Arab spring to Occupy and anti-austerity, the last twenty years have witnessed the birth of a new type of mass mobilisation. Where Are The Unions? compares, for the first time, the challenges faced by movements in Latin America, the Arab world and Europe. Workers’ strikes and protests were a critical part of these events, yet their role has been significantly underestimated in many of the subsequent narratives. This book focuses on the complex interactions between organised workers, the unemployed, self-employed, youth, students and the state, and critically assesses the concept of the ‘precariat’. With contributions from across four continents, this is the most comprehensive look at the global context of mass mobilisation in the twenty-first century.

The Social Life of Economic Inequalities in Contemporary Latin America

Decades of Change

Author: Margit Ystanes,Iselin Åsedotter Strønen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331961536X

Category: Social Science

Page: 289

View: 6821

This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This edited volume examines how economic processes have worked upon social lives and social realities in Latin America during the past decades. Through tracing the effects of the neoliberal epoch into the era of the so-called pink tide, the book seeks to understand to what extent the turn to the left at the start of the millennium managed to challenge historically constituted configurations of inequality. A central argument in the book is that in spite of economic reforms and social advances on a range of arenas, the fundamental tenants of socio-economic inequalities have not been challenged substantially. As several countries are now experiencing a return to right-wing politics, this collection helps us better understand why inequalities are so entrenched in the Latin American continent, but also the complex and creative ways that it is continuously contested. The book directs itself to students, scholars and anyone interested in Latin America, economic anthropology, political anthropology, left-wing politics, poverty and socio-economic inequalities.

Political Order in Changing Societies

Author: Samuel P. Huntington

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300116205

Category: Political Science

Page: 488

View: 5593

This now classic examination of the development of viable political institutions in emerging nations is an enduring contribution to modern political analysis. The foreword by Fukuyama assesses Huntingdon's achievement.

Schools and Styles of Anthropological Theory

Author: Matei Candea

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315388243

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 1285

This book presents an overview of important currents of thought in social and cultural anthropology, from the 19th century to the present. It introduces readers to the origins, context and continuing relevance of a fascinating and exciting kaleidoscope of ideas that have transformed the humanities and social sciences, and the way we understand ourselves and the societies we live in today. Each chapter provides a thorough yet engaging introduction to a particular theoretical school, style or conceptual issue. Together they build up to a detailed and comprehensive critical introduction to the most salient areas of the field. The introduction reflects on the substantive themes which tie the chapters together and on what the very notions of ‘theory’ and ‘theoretical school’ bring to our understanding of anthropology as a discipline. The book tracks a core lecture series given at Cambridge University and is essential reading for all undergraduate students undertaking a course on anthropological theory or the history of anthropological thought. It will also be useful more broadly for students of social and cultural anthropology, sociology, human geography and cognate disciplines in the social sciences and humanities.

Research Ethics and Social Movements

Author: Kevin Gillan,Jenny Pickerill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131758600X

Category: Political Science

Page: 160

View: 803

What ethical challenges are faced by researchers studying social and political movements? Should scholars integrate their personal politics and identities into their research? What role should activists have in shaping the purposes or processes of social scientific research? How do changing political contexts affect the ethical integrity of a research project over time? These are some of the live issues of research ethics that face students and scholars whose research ‘subjects’ are located in contentious political terrain. The contributors to this volume expose their own ethical thinking as they have met such challenges head on. Each explores real dilemmas of ethical practice on the ground as they carry out research on social movements across the globe. Authors examining pro-democracy activists in Malaysia, sanctions-breakers in the Gaza Freedom Flotilla, environmental health organisations in North America and much else find that the narrow confines of Research Ethics Committees and Institutional Review Boards offer little guidance on the questions that really matter. They offer instead a demonstration of continual reflexivity that is both personal and political in its approach. This book opens up debate on research ethics, delineating key challenges and offering hopeful and practical ways forward for real-world, ethical social science. This bookw as published as a special issue of Social Movement Studies.

The Interpretation of Cultures

Author: Clifford Geertz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093566

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 621

In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.

The Anthropology of Citizenship

A Reader

Author: Sian Lazar

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 1118412915

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 9218

The Anthropology of Citizenship introduces thetheoretical foundations of and cutting edge approaches tocitizenship in the contemporary world, in local, national andglobal contexts. Key readings provide a cross-cultural perspectiveon citizenship practices, and an individual citizen’srelationship with the state. Introduces a range of exciting and cutting edge approaches tocitizenship in the contemporary world Provides key readings for students and researchers who wish togain an understanding of citizenship practices, and anindividual’s relationship with the state in a globalcontext Offers an anthropological perspective on citizenship, the selfand political agency, with a focus on encounters between citizensand the state in education, law, development, and immigrationpolicy Provides students with an understanding of the theoreticalfoundations of citizenship, as characterized by liberal and civicrepublican ideas of political belonging and exclusion Explores how citizenship is constructed at different scales andin different spaces Twenty-five key writings identify what is a new and vibrantsubfield within politics and anthropological research

Worldwide Mobilizations

Class Struggles and Urban Commoning

Author: Don Kalb,Massimiliano Mollona

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785339079

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 8394

The past decades have seen significant urban insurrections worldwide, and this volume analyzes some of them from an anthropological perspective; it argues that transformations of urban class relationships must be approached in a way that is both globally informed and deeply embedded in local and popular histories, and contends that every case of urban mobilization should be understood against its precise context in the global capitalist transformation. The book examines cases of mobilization across the globe, and employs a Marxian class framework, open to the diverse and multi-scalar dynamics of urban politics, especially struggles for spatial justice.

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062316109

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 5173

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

Avoiding Politics

How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life

Author: Nina Eliasoph

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521587594

Category: Political Science

Page: 330

View: 8028

Nina Eliasoph's vivid portrait of American civic life reveals an intriguing culture of political avoidance. Despite the importance for democracy of open-ended political conversation among ordinary citizens, many Americans try hard to avoid appearing to care about politics. To discover how, where and why Americans create this culture of avoidance, the author accompanied suburban volunteers, activists, and recreation club members for over two years, listening to them talk - and avoid talking - about the wider world, together and in encounters with government, media, and corporate authorities. She shows how citizens create and express ideas in everyday life, contrasting their privately expressed convictions with their lack of public political engagement. Her book challenges received ideas about culture, power and democracy, while exposing the hard work of producing apathy.

Women's Activism in Africa

Struggles for Rights and Representation

Author: Balghis Badri,Aili Mari Tripp

Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.

ISBN: 1783609117

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 6879

Throughout Africa, growing numbers of women are coming together and making their voices heard, mobilising around causes ranging from democracy and land rights to campaigns against domestic violence. In Tanzania and Tunisia, women have made major gains in their struggle for equal political rights, and in Sierra Leone and Liberia women have been at the forefront of efforts to promote peace and reconciliation. While some of these movements have been influenced by international feminism and external donors, increasingly it is African women who are shaping the global struggle for women’s rights. Bringing together African authors who themselves are part of the activist groups, this collection represents the only comprehensive and up-to-date overview of women’s movements in contemporary Africa. Drawing on case studies and fresh empirical material from across the continent, the authors challenge the prevailing assumption that notions of women’s rights have trickled down from the global north to the south, showing instead that these movements have been shaped by above all the unique experiences and concerns of the local women involved.

Analytic Narratives

Author: Robert H. Bates

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691001296

Category: Political Science

Page: 249

View: 3525

How can social scientists draw broad, applicable principles of political order from specific historical examples? In this volume, five senior scholars offer a methodological response to this question. The result is both a methodological manifesto and an applied handbook.

Doing the Rights Thing

Rights-based Development and Latin American NGOs

Author: Maxine Molyneux,Sian Lazar

Publisher: ITDG Publishing

ISBN: 9781853395680

Category: Political Science

Page: 164

View: 3182

What is 'rights-based development'? How is it being put into practice in different contexts? What is its potential to achieve more equitable and effective development outcomes? Governments, development agencies and NGOs concerned with poverty alleviation have increasingly sought to integrate rights into their work. The term 'rights-based development' has been coined to describe these efforts but there is limited understanding of how such approaches are being worked out in practice. The authors examine the ways in which rights-based strategies have been understood in development practice in Latin America. They stress the political and personal nature of development especially the importance of enabling people to make their own demands of the state and other institutions. Rights-based development work has involved combining ideas of citizenship, democracy, participation and empowerment in novel ways. This book contributes to the creation of a fuller understanding of this approach to development and reveals the potential that it offers in ongoing efforts to secure more equitable as well as more effective and inclusive development outcomes.

Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia

Author: Carlos Fausto

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107020069

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 4427

Describes the culture of the Parakanã, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, focusing on conflict and ritual.

Blood and Fire

Author: Mary Roldán

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822383691

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3776

Between 1946 and 1966a surge of violence in Colombia left 200,000 dead in one of the worst conflicts the western hemisphere has ever experienced. the first seven years of this little-studied period of terror, known as la Violencia, is the subject of Blood and Fire. Scholars have traditionally assumed that partisan politics drove La Violencia, but Mary Roldán challenges earlier assessments by providing a nuanced account of the political and cultural motives behind the fratricide. Although the author acknowledges that partisan animosities played an important role in the disintegration of peaceful discourse into violence, she argues that conventional political conflicts were intensified by other concerns. Through an analysis of the evolution of violence in Antioquia, which at the time was the wealthiest and most economically diverse region of Colombia, Roldán demonstrates how tensions between regional politicians and the weak central state, diverse forms of social prejudice, and processes of economic development combined to make violence a preferred mode of political action. Privatization of state violence into paramilitary units and the emergence of armed resistance movements exacted a horrible cost on Colombian civic life, and these processes continue to plague the country. Roldan’s reading of the historical events suggests that Antioquia’s experience of la Violencia was the culmination of a brand of internal colonialism in which regional identity formation based on assumptions of cultural superiority was used to justify violence against racial or ethnic "others" and as a pretext to seize land and natural resources. Blood and Fire demonstrates that, far from being a peculiarity of the Colombians, la Violencia was a logical product of capitalist development and state formation in the modern world. This is the first study to analyze intersections of ethnicity, geography, and class to explore the genesis of Colombian violence, and it has implications for the study of repression in many other nations.

Water Justice

Author: Rutgerd Boelens,Tom Perreault,Jeroen Vos,Margreet Zwarteveen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107179084

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 390

View: 7035

An overview of critical conceptual approaches to water justice, illustrated with global historic and contemporary case studies of socio-environmental struggles.

Investing in Cultural Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue

Author: Unesco

Publisher: UNESCO

ISBN: 9231040774

Category: Political Science

Page: 402

View: 1911

This report analyses all aspects of cultural diversity, which has emerged as a key concern of the international community in recent decades, and maps out new approaches to monitoring and shaping the changes that are taking place. It highlights, in particular, the interrelated challenges of cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue and the way in which strong homogenizing forces are matched by persistent diversifying trends. The report proposes a series of ten policy-oriented recommendations, to the attention of States, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, international and regional bodies, national institutions and the private sector on how to invest in cultural diversity. Emphasizing the importance of cultural diversity in different areas (languages, education, communication and new media development, and creativity and the marketplace) based on data and examples collected from around the world, the report is also intended for the general public. It proposes a coherent vision of cultural diversity and clarifies how, far from being a threat, it can become beneficial to the action of the international community.

Mobilizing without the Masses

Control and Contention in China

Author: Diana Fu

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110835615X

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 5335

When advocacy organizations are forbidden from rallying people to take to the streets, what do they do? When activists are detained for coordinating protests, are their hands ultimately tied? Based on political ethnography inside both legal and blacklisted labor organizations in China, this book reveals how state repression is deployed on the ground and to what effect on mobilization. It presents a novel dynamic of civil society contention - mobilizing without the masses - that lowers the risk of activism under duress. Instead of facilitating collective action, activists coach the aggrieved to challenge authorities one by one. In doing so, they lower the risks of organizing while empowering the weak. This dynamic represents a third pathway of contention that challenges conventional understandings of mobilization in an illiberal state. It takes readers inside the world of underground labor organizing and opens the black box of repression inside the world's most powerful authoritarian state.

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