Search Results: the-story-of-an-african-farm

The Story of an African Farm

Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1473397146

Category: Fiction

Page: 430

View: 1888

This early work by Olive Schreiner was originally published in 1883 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'The Story of an African Farm' was penned under the pseudonym Ralph Iron and the novel details the lives of three characters, first as children and then as adults, and when published caused significant controversy over its frank portrayal of freethought, feminism, premarital sex, and transvestitism. Olive Emilie Albertina Schreiner was born on 24th March 1855 at the Wesleyan Missionary Society station at Wittebergen in the Eastern Cape, near Herschel in South Africa. In 1880, Olive set sail for the United Kingdom with the goal of taking a position as a trainee nurse at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh in Scotland. Unfortunately ill-health prevented her from studying and she was forced to concede that writing would and could be her only work in life. She became increasingly involved with the politics of the South Africa, leading her to make influential acquaintances such as Cecil John Rhodes, with whom she eventually became disillusioned and wrote a scathing allegory in his honour.

The Story of an African Farm

A Novel

Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: South Africa

Page: 375

View: 2789

The Last Hunger Season

A Year in an African Farm Community on the Brink of Change

Author: Roger Thurow

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610393422

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 1392

At 4:00 am, Leonida Wanyama lit a lantern in her house made of sticks and mud. She was up long before the sun to begin her farm work, as usual. But this would be no ordinary day, this second Friday of the new year. This was the day Leonida and a group of smallholder farmers in western Kenya would begin their exodus, as she said, “from misery to Canaan,” the land of milk and honey.Africa’s smallholder farmers, most of whom are women, know misery. They toil in a time warp, living and working essentially as their forebears did a century ago. With tired seeds, meager soil nutrition, primitive storage facilities, wretched roads, and no capital or credit, they harvest less than one-quarter the yields of Western farmers. The romantic ideal of African farmers––rural villagers in touch with nature, tending bucolic fields––is in reality a horror scene of malnourished children, backbreaking manual work, and profound hopelessness. Growing food is their driving preoccupation, and still they don’t have enough to feed their families throughout the year. The wanjala––the annual hunger season that can stretch from one month to as many as eight or nine––abides.But in January 2011, Leonida and her neighbors came together and took the enormous risk of trying to change their lives. Award-winning author and world hunger activist Roger Thurow spent a year with four of them––Leonida Wanyama, Rasoa Wasike, Francis Mamati, and Zipporah Biketi––to intimately chronicle their efforts. In The Last Hunger Season, he illuminates the profound challenges these farmers and their families face, and follows them through the seasons to see whether, with a little bit of help from a new social enterprise organization called One Acre Fund, they might transcend lives of dire poverty and hunger.The daily dramas of the farmers’ lives unfold against the backdrop of a looming global challenge: to feed a growing population, world food production must nearly double by 2050. If these farmers succeed, so might we all.

Billy Phelan's Greatest Game

Author: William Kennedy

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1849838550

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 7905

Billy Phelan, a slightly tarnished poker player, pool hustler, and small-time bookie, moves through the lurid nighttime glare of a tough Depression-era town. A resourceful man full of Irish pluck, Billy works the fringes of Albany sporting life with his own particular style and private code of honor until he finds himself in the dangerous position of potential go-between in the kidnapping of a political boss's son. In relating Billy's fall from the underworld grace and his storybook redemption, Kennedy captures the seamy underside of a brassy, sweaty city that would prefer to pretend that the Depression doesn't exist.

Twenty Chickens For A Saddle

The Story of an African Childhood

Author: Robyn Scott

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408842912

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 7934

When Robyn Scott was six years old her parents abruptly exchanged the tranquil pastures of New Zealand for a converted cowshed in the wilds of Botswana. Once there, Robyn and her siblings, mostly left to amuse themselves, grew up collecting snakes, canoeing with crocodiles and breaking in horses in the veld. In the shadow of one of Africa's worst AIDS crises, this moving, enchanting memoir is an extraordinary portrait of an unforgettable childhood.

Dreams

Author: Olive Schreiner

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1425009255

Category: Fiction

Page: 132

View: 4385

The magnum opus and most famous work of brilliant writer and story-teller Olive Schreiner. The book comprises of eleven short stories based on her own dreams. Each story represents her thoughts and views on life. Captivating!

Rainbow's End

A Memoir of Childhood, War and an African Farm

Author: Lauren St John

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743286804

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 5509

Traces the author's coming-of-age in civil-war-torn Rhodesia, where her family settled after purchasing the farm of a brutally murdered family, detailing a youth marked by terrorism, dangerous wild animals, and the author's embittered realization that everyone she knew was on the wrong side of the conflict. By the author of Hardcore Troubadore. Reprint. 40,000 first printing.

Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands

Top Crime Story

Author: Mary Seacole

Publisher: 谷月社

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 172

View: 1267

I was born in the town of Kingston, in the island of Jamaica, some time in the present century. As a female, and a widow, I may be well excused giving the precise date of this important event. But I do not mind confessing that the century and myself were both young together, and that we have grown side by side into age and consequence. I am a Creole, and have good Scotch blood coursing in my veins. My father was a soldier, of an old Scotch family; and to him I often trace my affection for a camp-life, and my sympathy with what I have heard my friends call “the pomp, pride, and circumstance of glorious war.” Many people have also traced to my Scotch blood that energy and activity which are not always found in the Creole race, and which have carried me to so many [Pg 2] varied scenes: and perhaps they are right. I have often heard the term “lazy Creole” applied to my country people; but I am sure I do not know what it is to be indolent. All my life long I have followed the impulse which led me to be up and doing; and so far from resting idle anywhere, I have never wanted inclination to rove, nor will powerful enough to find a way to carry out my wishes. That these qualities have led me into many countries, and brought me into some strange and amusing adventures, the reader, if he or she has the patience to get through this book, will see. Some people, indeed, have called me quite a female Ulysses. I believe that they intended it as a compliment; but from my experience of the Greeks, I do not consider it a very flattering one. It is not my intention to dwell at any length upon the recollections of my childhood. My mother kept a boarding-house in Kingston, and was, like very many of the Creole women, an admirable doctress; in high repute with the officers of both services, and their wives, who were from time to time stationed at Kingston. It was very natural that I should inherit her tastes; and so I had from early youth a yearning for medical knowledge and practice which has never deserted me. When I was a very young child I was taken by an old lady, who brought me up in her household among her own grandchildren, and who could scarcely have shown me more kindness had I been one of them; indeed, I was so spoiled by my kind patroness that, but for being frequently with my mother, I might very likely have grown up idle and useless. But I saw so much of her, and of her patients, that the ambition to become a doctress early took firm root in my mind; and I was very [Pg 3] young when I began to make use of the little knowledge I had acquired from watching my mother...

Time Twisters - Cape of Slaves

Author: Sam Roth

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0143529153

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 184

View: 7606

There's a column of green particles twisting down in the dark. For a moment I forget my desperate situation and that my family life sucks. A thin stream of green dust hovers in the air and then, as if I'm attracting it in some way, it changes direction and moves towards me. As it touches my bare arms, it glows brighter for a second and then sinks into my skin. I jump off the window sill and go to the mirror. I look just the same - a twelve-year-old girl, with pale skin, a dark ponytail and a skew nose. I frown, seeing my forehead crunch up. Am I the same old Sarah? But Sarah isn't the same, and when she is transported back to the time of witch-hunts through a library book picture, she is lucky to come back alive. Knowing she needs to meet other time twisters like herself, she finds cool dude, Toby, and science geek, Bones. Together they decide to risk their lives to rescue a missing girl, last seen in front of a painting at the Cape of Slaves Exhibition. It is an adventure that will leave them all changed forever. Will they find her in the past? Will they be sold as slaves? And will the portal in the painting stay open long enough for them to get back to the present?

Daughters of Decadence

Women Writers of the Fin-de-Siècle

Author: Elaine Showalter

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813520186

Category: Fiction

Page: 326

View: 757

At the turn of the century, short stories by--and often about--"New Women" flooded the pages English and American magazines such as the Atlantic Monthly, Harpers, and the Yellow Book. This daring new fiction, often innovative in form and courageous in its candid representations of female sexuality, marital discontent, and feminist protest, shocked Victorian critics, who denounced the authors as "literary degenerates" or "erotomaniacs." This collection brings together twenty of the most original and important stories from this period. The writers included in this highly readable volume are Kate Chopin, Victoria Cross, George Egerton, Julia Constance Fletcher, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sarah Grand, Vernon Lee, Ada Leverson, Charlotte Mew, Olive Schreiner, Edith Wharton, Constance Fenimore Woolson, and Mabel E. Wotton. As Elaine Showalter shows in her introduction, the short fiction of the Fin-de-Siecle is the missing link between the Golden Age of Victorian women writers and the new era of feminist modernism. Elaine Showalter is a professor of English at Princeton University. She is the author of A Literature of Their Own, The Female Malady, and other books, and editor of Alternative Alcott, a volume in the American Women Writers Series

Guanya Pau

A Story of an African Princess

Author: Joseph Jeffrey Walters

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Tribes

Page: 146

View: 2876

Tales of an African Vet

Author: Roy Aronson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0762766905

Category: Nature

Page: 240

View: 1507

When do you watch a wild animal suffer and let nature take its course, and when do you intervene? In his more than twenty-five years as an African vet, Roy Aronson has tended to a two-ton rhino that lost its horn after colliding with a concrete wall, facilitated the miraculous recovery of a squirrel monkey, performed eye surgery on a lion out in the bush, and treated a hedgehog that had been mauled by a dog. He has also worked with some of Africa’s most dedicated conservationists and wildlife veterinarians. He has witnessed their passion and bravery and been with them when hard decisions had to be made. Tales of an African Vet brings together Dr. Aronson’s adventures in a rare behind-the-scenes look at those who treat wild animals in their natural habitats. Whether you are drawn to outdoor adventure stories, African wildlife, or the veterinarian’s trade, you will find this a riveting read, filled with rich insights into both the animal and human cultures of Africa.

Out of Africa

Author: Isak Dinesen

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0307799581

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9265

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time In this book, the author of Seven Gothic Tales gives a true account of her life on her plantation in Kenya. She tells with classic simplicity of the ways of the country and the natives: of the beauty of the Ngong Hills and coffee trees in blossom: of her guests, from the Prince of Wales to Knudsen, the old charcoal burner, who visited her: of primitive festivals: of big game that were her near neighbors--lions, rhinos, elephants, zebras, buffaloes--and of Lulu, the little gazelle who came to live with her, unbelievably ladylike and beautiful. The Random House colophon made its debut in February 1927 on the cover of a little pamphlet called "Announcement Number One." Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer, the company's founders, had acquired the Modern Library from publishers Boni and Liveright two years earlier. One day, their friend the illustrator Rockwell Kent stopped by their office. Cerf later recalled, "Rockwell was sitting at my desk facing Donald, and we were talking about doing a few books on the side, when suddenly I got an inspiration and said, 'I've got the name for our publishing house. We just said we were go-ing to publish a few books on the side at random. Let's call it Random House.' Donald liked the idea, and Rockwell Kent said, 'That's a great name. I'll draw your trademark.' So, sitting at my desk, he took a piece of paper and in five minutes drew Random House, which has been our colophon ever since." Throughout the years, the mission of Random House has remained consistent: to publish books of the highest quality, at random. We are proud to continue this tradition today. This edition is set from the first American edition of 1937 and commemorates the seventy-fifth anniversary of Random House. From the Hardcover edition.

Singing Away the Hunger

The Autobiography of an African Woman

Author: Mpho 'M'atsepo Nthunya,K. Limakatso Kendall

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253211620

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 174

View: 1492

"... this gem of a book deserves a wide audience. Appropriate for African and women's studies courses and a must for college and university libraries." --Choice "... Mpho relates the story of her life with an integrity that makes for utterly compelling reading.... The fortitude of this woman, now in her late 60s, is a lesson to us all." --The Bookseller, United Kingdom "This is a fascinating autobiography..." --KLIATT "... a powerful autobiography of a Lesotho elder who tells her life as an African woman in South Africa. The focus on black culture and concerns as much as racism allows for an unusual depth of understanding of black concerns and lifestyles in Africa." --Reviewer's Bookwatch "An African woman's poignant and beautifully crafted memoir lyrically portrays the brutal poverty and reliance on ritual that shape the lives of her people, the Basotho.... A commanding and important work that will captivate readers with its unique voice, narrative power, and unforgettable scenes of life in Southern Africa." --Kirkus Reviews "... a stunning autobiography of a remarkable woman... Nthunya's telling is eloquent. Although her voice is generally one of dignified emotional distance, it is punctuated by her very human humor and pain." --Publishers Weekly "... recommended for collections in African folklore." --Library Journal "I am telling my stories in English for many months now, and it is a time for me to see my whole life. I see that things are always changing. I was born in 1930, so I remember many things which were happening in the old days in Lesotho and which happen no more. I lived in Benoni Location for more than ten years, and I saw the Boer policemen taking black people and beating them like dogs. They even took me once, and kept me in one of their jails for a while." --Mpho 'M'atsepo Nthunya A compelling and unique autobiography by an African woman with little formal education, less privilege, and almost no experience of books or writing. Mpho's is a voice almost never heard in literature or history, a voice from within the struggle of "ordinary" African women to negotiate a world which incorporates ancient pastoral ways and the congestion, brutality, and racist violence of city life. It is also the voice of a born storyteller who has a subject worthy of her gifts--a story for all the world to hear.

Olive Schreiner and African Modernism

Allegory, Empire and Postcolonial Writing

Author: Jade Munslow Ong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317388364

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 2675

This book works across established categories of modernism and postcolonialism in order to radically revise the periods, places, and topics traditionally associated with anti-colonialism and aesthetic experimentation in African literature. The book is the first account of Olive Schreiner as a theorist and practitioner of modernist form advancing towards an emergent postcolonialism. The book draws on and broadens discussions in and around the blossoming field of global modernist studies by interrogating the conventionally accepted genealogy of development that positions Europe and America as the sites of innovation. It provides an original examination of the relationships between metaphor, postcolonialism, and modernist experimentation by showing how politically and aesthetically innovative African forms rely on allegorical structures, in contrast to the symbolism dominant in Euro-American modernism. An original theoretical concept of the role of primitivism and allegory within the context of modernism and associated critical theory is proposed through the integration of postcolonial, Marxist, and ecocritical approaches to literature. The book provides original readings of Schreiner’s three novels, Undine, The Story of An African Farm, and From Man to Man, in light of the new theory of primitivism in African literature by directly addressing the issue of narrative form. This argument is contextualised in relation to the work of other Southern African authors, in whose writings the impact of Schreiner’s politics and aesthetics can be traced. These authors include J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Doris Lessing, Solomon T. Plaatje, and Zoe Wicomb, amongst others. This book brings the most current debates in modernist studies, ecocriticism, and primitivism into the field of postcolonial studies and contributes to a widening of the debates surrounding gender, race, empire, and modernism.

Scribbling the Cat

Travels with an African Soldier

Author: Alexandra Fuller

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101118801

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 4738

When Alexandra ("Bo") Fuller was home in Zambia a few years ago, visiting her parents for Christmas, she asked her father about a nearby banana farmer who was known for being a "tough bugger." Her father's response was a warning to steer clear of him; he told Bo: "Curiosity scribbled the cat." Nonetheless, Fuller began her strange friendship with the man she calls K, a white African and veteran of the Rhodesian war. With the same fiercely beautiful prose that won her acclaim for Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, Fuller here recounts her friendship with K. K is, seemingly, a man of contradictions: tattooed, battle scarred, and weathered by farm work, he is a lion of a man, feral and bulletproof. Yet he is also a born-again Christian, given to weeping when he recollects his failed romantic life, and more than anything else welling up inside with memories of battle. For his war, like all wars, was a brutal one, marked by racial strife, jungle battles, unimaginable tortures, and the murdering of innocent civilians—and K, like all the veterans of the war, has blood on his hands. Driven by K's memories, Fuller and K decide to enter the heart of darkness in the most literal way—by traveling from Zambia through Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) and Mozambique to visit the scenes of the war and to meet other veterans. It is a strange journey into the past, one marked at once by somber reflections and odd humor and featuring characters such as Mapenga, a fellow veteran who lives with his pet lion on a little island in the middle of a lake and is known to cope with his personal demons by refusing to speak for days on end. What results from Fuller's journey is a remarkably unbiased and unsentimental glimpse of men who have killed, mutilated, tortured, and scrambled to survive during wartime and who now must attempt to live with their past and live past their sins. In these men, too, we get a glimpse of life in Africa, a land that besets its creatures with pests, plagues, and natural disasters, making the people there at once more hardened and more vulnerable than elsewhere. Scribbling the Cat is an engrossing and haunting look at war, Africa, and the lines of sanity.

A Good African Story

How a Small Company Built a Global Coffee Brand

Author: Andrew Rugasira

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448104726

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 2051

Since it was founded in 2003, Good African Coffee has helped thousands of farmers earn a decent living, send their children to school and escape a spiral of debt and dependence. Africa has received over $1 trillion in aid over the last fifty years and yet despite these huge inflows, the continent remains mired in poverty, disease and systemic corruption. In A Good African Story, as Andrew Rugasira recounts the very personal story of his company and the challenges that he has faced – and overcome – as an African entrepreneur, he provides a tantalising glimpse of what Africa could be, and argues that trade has achieved what years of aid have failed to deliver. This is a book about Africa taking its destiny in its own hands, and dictating the terms of its future.

Mother to Mother

Author: Sindiwe Magona

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807009970

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 9371

Sindiwe Magona's novel Mother to Mother explores the South African legacy of apartheid through the lens of a woman who remembers a life marked by oppression and injustice. Magona decided to write this novel when she discovered that Fulbright Scholar Amy Biehl, who had been killed while working to organize the nation's first ever democratic elections in 1993, died just a few yards away from her own permanent residence in Guguletu, Capetown. She then learned that one of the boys held responsible for the killing was in fact her neighbor's son. Magona began to imagine how easily it might have been her own son caught up in the wave of violence that day. The book is based on this real-life incident, and takes the form of an epistle to Amy Biehl's mother. The murderer's mother, Mandisi, writes about her life, the life of her child, and the colonized society that not only allowed, but perpetuated violence against women and impoverished black South Africans under the reign of apartheid. The result is not an apology for the murder, but a beautifully written exploration of the society that bred such violence.

Olive Schreiner

A Biography

Author: Ruth First,Ann Scott

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780704341562

Category: Authors, South African

Page: 383

View: 657

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