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The Unredeemed Captive

A Family Story from Early America

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 135

Nominated for the National Book Award and winner of the Francis Parkman Prize. The setting for this haunting and encyclopedically researched work of history is colonial Massachusetts, where English Puritans first endeavoured to "civilize" a "savage" native populace. There, in February 1704, a French and Indian war party descended on the village of Deerfield, abducting a Puritan minister and his children. Although John Williams was eventually released, his daughter horrified the family by staying with her captors and marrying a Mohawk husband. Out of this incident, The Bancroft Prize-winning historian John Devos has constructed a gripping narrative that opens a window into North America where English, French, and Native Americans faced one another across gilfs of culture and belief, and sometimes crossed over.

For Adam's Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England

Author: Allegra di Bonaventura

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 235

“Incomparably vivid . . . as enthralling a portrait of family life [in colonial New England] as we are likely to have.”—Wall Street Journal In the tradition of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s classic, A Midwife’s Tale, comes this groundbreaking narrative by one of America’s most promising colonial historians. Joshua Hempstead was a well-respected farmer and tradesman in New London, Connecticut. As his remarkable diary—kept from 1711 until 1758—reveals, he was also a slave owner who owned Adam Jackson for over thirty years. In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution. Slavery is often left out of our collective memory of New England’s history, but it was hugely impactful on the central unit of colonial life: the family. In every corner, the lines between slavery and freedom were blurred as families across the social spectrum fought to survive. In this enlightening study, a new portrait of an era emerges.

The Encyclopedia of North American Indian Wars, 1607–1890: A Political, Social, and Military History [3 volumes]

A Political, Social, and Military History

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1318

View: 889

This encyclopedia provides a broad, in-depth, and multidisciplinary look at the causes and effects of warfare between whites and Native Americans, encompassing nearly three centuries of history. • Entries written by over 50 leading scholars in the field • 25 charts • 26 maps • A glossary of terms

The Tried and the True

Native American Women Confronting Colonization

Author: John Demos

Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 111

View: 930

Shows how interaction with white colonists changed the lives of Native American women.

The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West

Author: Andrew R. Graybill

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 499

Describes the mixed marriage of a nineteenth century Montana fur trader and his Piegan Blackfeet bride and the prejudice experienced by their children and grandchildren who ultimately fought their blood kin at Wounded Knee.

The Name of War

King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity

Author: Jill Lepore

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 556

Winner of the Bancroft Prize King Philip's War, the excruciating racial war—colonists against Indians—that erupted in New England in 1675, was, in proportion to population, the bloodiest in American history. Some even argued that the massacres and outrages on both sides were too horrific to "deserve the name of a war." The war's brutality compelled the colonists to defend themselves against accusations that they had become savages. But Jill Lepore makes clear that it was after the war—and because of it—that the boundaries between cultures, hitherto blurred, turned into rigid ones. King Philip's War became one of the most written-about wars in our history, and Lepore argues that the words strengthened and hardened feelings that, in turn, strengthened and hardened the enmity between Indians and Anglos. Telling the story of what may have been the bitterest of American conflicts, and its reverberations over the centuries, Lepore has enabled us to see how the ways in which we remember past events are as important in their effect on our history as were the events themselves. Winner of the the 1998 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award of the Phi Beta Kappa Society

A Companion to Colonial America

Author: Daniel Vickers

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 138

A Companion to Colonial America consists of twenty-three original essays by expert historians on the key issues and topics in American colonial history. Each essay surveys the scholarship and prevailing interpretations in these key areas, discussing the differing arguments and assessing their merits. Coverage includes politics, religion, migration, gender, ecology, and many others.

First Generations

Women in Colonial America

Author: Carol Berkin

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 443

Indian, European, and African women of seventeenth and eighteenth-century America were defenders of their native land, pioneers on the frontier, willing immigrants, and courageous slaves. They were also - as traditional scholarship tends to omit - as important as men in shaping American culture and history. This remarkable work is a gripping portrait that gives early-American women their proper place in history.

Sermons by Jonathan Edwards on the Matthean Parables, Volume II

Divine Husbandman (On the Parable of the Sower and the Seed)

Author: Ken Minkema

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 140

View: 906

This second volume of Sermons by Jonathan Edwards on the Matthean Parables contains a previously unpublished series of six sermons by Edwards on Jesus' parable of the Sower and the Seed, as found in Matthew 13:3-7. Edwards preached these sermons in 1740 immediately following the visit of George Whitefield to Edwards' church in Northampton, Massachusetts, in October of that year. Not only does this series have a historical significance for its place in the Great Awakening, but it contains important pronouncements on the preacher's craft and the hearer's responsibilities. These sermons have been placed in the context of Edwards' preaching style and method, and framed by historical considerations. Prepared from the original manuscripts by the staff of the Jonathan Edwards Center at Yale University, this series represents a significant addition to the available Edwards corpus that will be of interest to scholars, religious leaders, and general readers.

Relative Values

Reconfiguring Kinship Studies

Author: Sarah Franklin

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 519

View: 162

DIVA collection of essays that redefine and transform the field of kinship./div

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