Search Results: the-unredeemed-captive-a-family-story-from-early-america

The Unredeemed Captive

A Family Story from Early America

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030779069X

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4328

Nominated for the National Book Award and winner of the Francis Parkman Prize. The setting for this haunting and encyclopedically researched work of history is colonial Massachusetts, where English Puritans first endeavoured to "civilize" a "savage" native populace. There, in February 1704, a French and Indian war party descended on the village of Deerfield, abducting a Puritan minister and his children. Although John Williams was eventually released, his daughter horrified the family by staying with her captors and marrying a Mohawk husband. Out of this incident, The Bancroft Prize-winning historian John Devos has constructed a gripping narrative that opens a window into North America where English, French, and Native Americans faced one another across gilfs of culture and belief, and sometimes crossed over.

The Unredeemed Captive

A Family Story from Early America

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679759611

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 8113

Describes the 1704 French and Indian attack on Deerfield, Massachusetts, and the capture of Puritan minister John Williams and his five children.

The Unredeemed Captive

A Family Story from Early America

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030779069X

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4134

Nominated for the National Book Award and winner of the Francis Parkman Prize. The setting for this haunting and encyclopedically researched work of history is colonial Massachusetts, where English Puritans first endeavoured to "civilize" a "savage" native populace. There, in February 1704, a French and Indian war party descended on the village of Deerfield, abducting a Puritan minister and his children. Although John Williams was eventually released, his daughter horrified the family by staying with her captors and marrying a Mohawk husband. Out of this incident, The Bancroft Prize-winning historian John Devos has constructed a gripping narrative that opens a window into North America where English, French, and Native Americans faced one another across gilfs of culture and belief, and sometimes crossed over.

Puritan Girl, Mohawk Girl

A Novel

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 1683351509

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 5839

In this riveting historical fiction narrative, National Book Award Finalist John Demos shares the story of a young Puritan girl and her life-changing experience with the Mohawk people. Inspired by Demos’s award-winning novel The Unredeemed Captive, Puritan Girl, Mohawk Girl will captivate a young audience, providing a Native American perspective rather than the Western one typically taught in the classroom. As the armed conflicts between the English colonies in North America and the French settlements raged in the 1700s, a young Puritan girl, Eunice Williams, is kidnapped by Mohawk people and taken to Canada. She is adopted into a new family, a new culture, and a new set of traditions that will define her life. As Eunice spends her days learning the Mohawk language and the roles of women and girls in the community, she gains a deeper understanding of her Mohawk family. Although her father and brother try to persuade Eunice to return to Massachusetts, she ultimately chooses to remain with her Mohawk family and settlement. Puritan Girl, Mohawk Girl offers a compelling and rich lesson that is sure to enchant young readers and those who want to deepen their understanding of Native American history.

The Heathen School

A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0385351666

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5736

Longlisted for the 2014 National Book Award The astonishing story of a unique missionary project—and the America it embodied—from award-winning historian John Demos. Near the start of the nineteenth century, as the newly established United States looked outward toward the wider world, a group of eminent Protestant ministers formed a grand scheme for gathering the rest of mankind into the redemptive fold of Christianity and “civilization.” Its core element was a special school for “heathen youth” drawn from all parts of the earth, including the Pacific Islands, China, India, and, increasingly, the native nations of North America. If all went well, graduates would return to join similar projects in their respective homelands. For some years, the school prospered, indeed became quite famous. However, when two Cherokee students courted and married local women, public resolve—and fundamental ideals—were put to a severe test. The Heathen School follows the progress, and the demise, of this first true melting pot through the lives of individual students: among them, Henry Obookiah, a young Hawaiian who ran away from home and worked as a seaman in the China Trade before ending up in New England; John Ridge, son of a powerful Cherokee chief and subsequently a leader in the process of Indian “removal”; and Elias Boudinot, editor of the first newspaper published by and for Native Americans. From its birth as a beacon of hope for universal “salvation,” the heathen school descends into bitter controversy, as American racial attitudes harden and intensify. Instead of encouraging reconciliation, the school exposes the limits of tolerance and sets off a chain of events that will culminate tragically in the Trail of Tears. In The Heathen School, John Demos marshals his deep empathy and feel for the textures of history to tell a moving story of families and communities—and to probe the very roots of American identity. From the Hardcover edition.

CIRCLES AND LINES

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674013247

Category: History

Page: 98

View: 6421

Their cyclical frame of reference was coming unmoored, giving way to a linear world view in early nineteenth-century America that is neatly captured by Kentucky doctor Daniel Drake's description of the chronography of his life."--BOOK JACKET.

A Little Commonwealth

Family Life in Plymouth Colony

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199725969

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5257

The year 2000 marks the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of A Little Commonwealth by Bancroft Prize-winning scholar John Demos. This groundbreaking study examines the family in the context of the colony founded by the Pilgrims who came over on the Mayflower. Basing his work on physical artifacts, wills, estate inventories, and a variety of legal and official enactments, Demos portrays the family as a structure of roles and relationships, emphasizing those of husband and wife, parent and child, and master and servant. The book's most startling insights come from a reconsideration of commonly-held views of American Puritans and of the ways in which they dealt with one another. Demos concludes that Puritan "repression" was not as strongly directed against sexuality as against the expression of hostile and aggressive impulses, and he shows how this pattern reflected prevalent modes of family life and child-rearing. The result is an in-depth study of the ordinary life of a colonial community, located in the broader environment of seventeenth-century America. Demos has provided a new foreword and a list of further reading for this second edition, which will offer a new generation of readers access to this classic study.

Captive Histories

English, French, and Native Narratives of the 1704 Deerfield Raid

Author: Evan Haefeli,Kevin Sweeney

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558495432

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 6577

Collects accounts of members of the Deerfield, Massachusetts community who were captured by Abenaki and Mohawk Indians along with accounts of the same events from the Native Americans themselves.

Captors and Captives

The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield

Author: Evan Haefeli,Kevin Sweeney

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558495036

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 4678

An account that explores the raid from the conflicting viewpoints of the raiders, both French-Canadian and Native American, and the Deerfield villagers.

Puritans Among the Indians

Accounts of Captivity and Redemption, 1676-1724

Author: Alden T. Vaughan,Edward W Clark

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674044609

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 286

View: 8862

These eight reports by white settlers held captive by Indians gripped the imagination not only of early settlers but also of American writers through our history. Puritans among the Indians presents, in modern spelling, the best of the New England narratives. These both delineate the social and ideological struggle between the captors and the settlers, and constitute a dramatic rendition of the Puritans' spiritual struggle for redemption.

The Boy Captive of Old Deerfield

Author: Mary P. Wells Smith

Publisher: Gideon House Books

ISBN: 1943133263

Category:

Page: 175

View: 9149

On the morning of February 29, 1704, a French and Indian force invaded Deerfield, MA, the northwesternmost outpost of the colonial frontier. During the raid, 47 residents of Deerfield were killed and 112 were taken captive by Indian raiders who forced their captives to March north in grueling conditions to Canada. "The Boy Captive of Old Deerfield" tells the story of 10-year-old Stephen Williams, one of the 112 residents taken captive in the raid. Smith describes Stephen’s transition from a boy terrorized by all that has happened to him and to those he loves to a boy who, over time, begins to adapt to the Indian way of life. Come follow Stephen as he battles starvation, learns to hunt, escapes dangerous situations and more. "The Boy Captive of Old Deerfield" is a true American classic that should be read by people of all ages interested in understanding the best and worst of early American frontier living.

Slaves in the Family

Author: Edward Ball

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 146689749X

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 2814

Fifteen years after its hardcover debut, the FSG Classics reissue of the celebrated work of narrative nonfiction that won the National Book Award and changed the American conversation about race, with a new preface by the author The Ball family hails from South Carolina—Charleston and thereabouts. Their plantations were among the oldest and longest-standing plantations in the South. Between 1698 and 1865, close to four thousand black people were born into slavery under the Balls or were bought by them. In Slaves in the Family, Edward Ball recounts his efforts to track down and meet the descendants of his family's slaves. Part historical narrative, part oral history, part personal story of investigation and catharsis, Slaves in the Family is, in the words of Pat Conroy, "a work of breathtaking generosity and courage, a magnificent study of the complexity and strangeness and beauty of the word ‘family.'"

Entertaining Satan

Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195174844

Category: History

Page: 543

View: 4225

In the first edition of the Bancroft Prize-winning Entertaining Satan, John Putnam Demos presented an entirely new perspective on American witchcraft. By investigating the surviving historical documents of over a hundred actual witchcraft cases, he vividly recreated the world of New England during the witchcraft trials and brought to light fascinating information on the role of witchcraft in early American culture. Now Demos has revisited his original work and updated it to illustrate why these early Americans' strange views on witchcraft still matter to us today. He provides a new Preface that puts forth a broader overview of witchcraft and looks at its place around the world--from ancient times right up to the present.

Indians and English

Facing Off in Early America

Author: Karen Ordahl Kupperman

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801482823

Category: History

Page: 297

View: 5410

In this vividly written book, prize-winning author Karen Ordahl Kupperman refocuses our understanding of encounters between English venturers and Algonquians all along the East Coast of North America in the early years of contact and settlement. All parties in these dramas were uncertain—hopeful and fearful—about the opportunity and challenge presented by new realities. Indians and English both believed they could control the developing relationship. Each group was curious about the other, and interpreted through their own standards and traditions. At the same time both came from societies in the process of unsettling change and hoped to derive important lessons by studying a profoundly different culture.These meetings and early relationships are recorded in a wide variety of sources. Native people maintained oral traditions about the encounters, and these were written down by English recorders at the time of contact and since; many are maintained to this day. English venturers, desperate to make readers at home understand how difficult and potentially rewarding their enterprise was, wrote constantly of their own experiences and observations and transmitted native lore. Kupperman analyzes all these sources in order to understand the true nature of these early years, when English venturers were so fearful and dependent on native aid and the shape of the future was uncertain.Building on the research in her highly regarded book Settling with the Indians, Kupperman argues convincingly that we must see both Indians and English as active participants in this unfolding drama.

Crossroads of Empire

The Middle Colonies in British North America

Author: Ned C. Landsman

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801899706

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7583

Ultimately, he argues, it was within the Middle Colonies that the question was first posed, What is the American?An insightful and valuable classroom synthesis of the scholarship of the Middle Colonies, Crossroads of Empire makes clear the vital role of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania in establishing an American identity.

Indian Captivity in Spanish America

Frontier Narratives

Author: Fernando Operé

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813925875

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 9471

Even before the arrival of Europeans to the Americas, the practice of taking captives was widespread among Native Americans. Indians took captives for many reasons: to replace—by adoption—tribal members who had been lost in battle, to use as barter for needed material goods, to use as slaves, or to use for reproductive purposes. From the legendary story of John Smith's captivity in the Virginia Colony to the wildly successful narratives of New England colonists taken captive by local Indians, the genre of the captivity narrative is well known among historians and students of early American literature. Not so for Hispanic America. Fernando Operé redresses this oversight, offering the first comprehensive historical and literary account of Indian captivity in Spanish-controlled territory from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. Originally published in Spanish in 2001 as Historias de la frontera: El cautiverio en la América hispánica, this newly translated work reveals key insights into Native American culture in the New World’s most remote regions. From the "happy captivity" of the Spanish military captain Francisco Nuñez de Pineda y Bascuñán, who in 1628 spent six congenial months with the Araucanian Indians on the Chilean frontier, to the harrowing nineteenth-century adventures of foreigners taken captive in the Argentine Pampas and Patagonia; from the declaraciones of the many captives rescued in the Rio de la Plata region of Argentina in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, to the riveting story of Helena Valero, who spent twenty-four years among the Yanomamö in Venezuela during the mid-twentieth century, Operé's vibrant history spans the entire gamut of Spain’s far-flung frontiers. Eventually focusing on the role of captivity in Latin American literature, Operé convincingly shows how the captivity genre evolved over time, first to promote territorial expansion and deny intercultural connections during the colonial era, and later to romanticize the frontier in the service of nationalism after independence. This important book is thus multidisciplinary in its concept, providing ethnographic, historical, and literary insights into the lives and customs of Native Americans and their captives in the New World.

Cahokia

Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101105178

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 2689

The fascinating story of a lost city and an unprecedented American civilization While Mayan and Aztec civilizations are widely known and documented, relatively few people are familiar with the largest prehistoric Native American city north of Mexico-a site that expert Timothy Pauketat brings vividly to life in this groundbreaking book. Almost a thousand years ago, a city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. Built around a sprawling central plaza and known as Cahokia, the site has drawn the attention of generations of archaeologists, whose work produced evidence of complex celestial timepieces, feasts big enough to feed thousands, and disturbing signs of human sacrifice. Drawing on these fascinating finds, Cahokia presents a lively and astonishing narrative of prehistoric America.

For Adam's Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England

Author: Allegra di Bonaventura

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0871403471

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 9875

“Incomparably vivid . . . as enthralling a portrait of family life [in colonial New England] as we are likely to have.”—Wall Street Journal In the tradition of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s classic, A Midwife’s Tale, comes this groundbreaking narrative by one of America’s most promising colonial historians. Joshua Hempstead was a well-respected farmer and tradesman in New London, Connecticut. As his remarkable diary—kept from 1711 until 1758—reveals, he was also a slave owner who owned Adam Jackson for over thirty years. In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution. Slavery is often left out of our collective memory of New England’s history, but it was hugely impactful on the central unit of colonial life: the family. In every corner, the lines between slavery and freedom were blurred as families across the social spectrum fought to survive. In this enlightening study, a new portrait of an era emerges.

Book of Ages

The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

Author: Jill Lepore

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307948838

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 442

View: 9154

A portrait of Benjamin Franklin's youngest sister, Jane, reveals how she was, like her brother, a passionate reader, gifted writer, and shrewd political commentator who made insightful observations about early America.

True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars

Author: Charlotte Alice Baker

Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. ; [Greenfield, Mass. : Hall]

ISBN: N.A

Category: Deerfield (Mass.)

Page: 407

View: 7613

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