Search Results: the-violent-american-century-war-and-terror-since-world-war-ii

The Violent American Century

War and Terror Since World War II

Author: John W. Dower

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608467260

Category: Political Science

Page: 150

View: 7797

World War II marked the apogee of industrialized “total war.” Great powers savaged one another. Hostilities engulfed the globe. Mobilization extended to virtually every sector of every nation. Air war, including the terror bombing of civilians, emerged as a central strategy of the victorious Anglo-American powers. The devastation was catastrophic almost everywhere, with the notable exception of the United States, which exited the strife unscathed and unmatched in power and influence. The death toll of fighting forces plus civilians worldwide was staggering. The Violent “American Century” addresses the U.S.-led transformations in war conduct and strategizing that followed 1945—beginning with brutal localized hostilities, proxy wars, and the nuclear terror of the Cold War, and ending with the asymmetrical conflicts of the present day. The military playbook now meshes brute force with a focus on non-state terrorism, counterinsurgency, clandestine operations, a vast web of overseas American military bases, and—most touted of all—a revolutionary new era of computerized “precision” warfare. By contrast to World War II, postwar death and destruction has been comparatively small. By any other measure, it has been appalling—and shows no sign of abating. The winner of numerous national prizes for his historical writings, including the Pulitzer and the National Book Award, Dower draws heavily on hard data and internal U.S. planning and pronouncements in this concise analysis of war and terror in our time. In doing so, he places U.S. policy and practice firmly within the broader context of global mayhem, havoc, and slaughter since World War II—always with bottom-line attentiveness to the human costs of this legacy of unceasing violence.

The Violent American Century

War and Terror Since World War II

Author: John Dower

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781608467235

Category: Political Science

Page: 150

View: 3582

World War II marked the apogee of industrialized "total war.” Great powers savaged one another. Hostilities engulfed the globe. Mobilization extended to virtually every sector of every nation. Air war, including the terror bombing of civilians, emerged as a central strategy of the victorious Anglo-American powers. The devastation was catastrophic almost everywhere, with the notable exception of the United States, which exited the strife unscathed and unmatched in power and influence. The death toll of fighting forces plus civilians worldwide was staggering. The Violent "American Century” addresses the U.S.-led transformations in war conduct and strategizing that followed 1945--beginning with brutal localized hostilities, proxy wars, and the nuclear terror of the Cold War, and ending with the asymmetrical conflicts of the present day. The military playbook now meshes brute force with a focus on non-state terrorism, counterinsurgency, clandestine operations, a vast web of overseas American military bases, and--most touted of all--a revolutionary new era of computerized "precision” warfare. By contrast to World War II, postwar death and destruction has been comparatively small. By any other measure, it has been appalling--and shows no sign of abating. The winner of numerous national prizes for his historical writings, including the Pulitzer and the National Book Award, Dower draws heavily on hard data and internal U.S. planning and pronouncements in this concise analysis of war and terror in our time. In doing so, he places U.S. policy and practice firmly within the broader context of global mayhem, havoc, and slaughter since World War II--always with bottom-line attentiveness to the human costs of this legacy of unceasing violence.

Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering

Japan in the Modern World

Author: John W. Dower

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 1595589376

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4681

Historian John W. Dower’s celebrated investigations into modern Japanese history, World War II, and U.S.–Japanese relations have earned him critical accolades and numerous honors, including the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Bancroft Prize. Now Dower returns to the major themes of his groundbreaking work, examining American and Japanese perceptions of key moments in their shared history. Both provocative and probing, Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering delves into a range of subjects, including the complex role of racism on both sides of the Pacific War, the sophistication of Japanese wartime propaganda, the ways in which the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is remembered in Japan, and the story of how the postwar study of Japan in the United States and the West was influenced by Cold War politics. Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering offers urgent insights by one of our greatest interpreters of the past into how citizens of democracy should deal with their history and, as Dower writes, “the need to constantly ask what is not being asked.”

In the Shadows of the American Century

The Rise and Decline of US Global Power

Author: Alfred W. MCCoy

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608467740

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 5682

In a completely original analysis, McCoy explores America’s rise as a world power, from the 1890s through the Cold War and its bid to extend its hegemony deep into the twenty-first century through a fusion of cyberwar, space warfare, trade pacts, and military alliances. McCoy then analyzes the marquee instruments of American hegemony—covert intervention, client elites, psychological torture, and worldwide surveillance. Alfred W. McCoy’s 2009 book Policing America’s Empire won the Kahin Prize from the Association for Asian Studies.

Cultures of War: Pearl Harbor / Hiroshima / 9-11 / Iraq

Author: John W. Dower

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393340686

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 1373

A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian presents a comparative analysis of September 11 and the subsequent War on Terror with Pearl Harbor and World War II, addressing institutional failures of intelligence and imagination and the driving forces behind Pan-Asian and Pan-Islam movements. Reprint. A National Book Award Finalist.

America and the Imperialism of Ignorance

US Foreign Policy Since 1945

Author: Andrew Alexander

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN: 1849542570

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 6946

American incomprehension of the outside world has been the chief problem in international affairs since the end of World War II. In America and the Imperialism of Ignorance, veteran political journalist Andrew Alexander constructs a meticulous case, including evidence gleaned from the steady opening up of Soviet archives, demonstrating why this is so. From starting the Cold War to revisiting unlearned lessons upon Cuba and Vietnam, the Middle East has latterly become the arena in which the American foreign policy approach proved wretchedly consistent. This has created six decades in which war was not the last resort of diplomacy but an early option, and where peace and order breaking out was thought to be the natural conclusion of military intervention. Alexander traces this 'shoot-first' tendency from 1945, arguing that on a grand scale the Cold War was a red herring in which the US and her proxies set out to counter a Soviet expansionism that never truly existed, and that by the time of the George W Bush era, the 'Industrial-Military-Complex' was in office offering little hope of a change in approach.

State Terrorism and the United States

From Counterinsurgency to the War on Terrorism

Author: Frederick Henry Gareau

Publisher: Zed Books

ISBN: 9781842775356

Category: Contre-rébellion

Page: 254

View: 452

This is a chilling analysis of the immediate predecessor of the US war on terrorism: its counter-insurgency policy during the Cold War. The US promised a low level response uniquely tailored to assisting third world states to respond to local insurgencies seeking social change. Drawing on the reports of Truth Commissions from six countries, Guatemala, El Salvador, Argentina, Chile, South Africa, and Indonesia, Frederick Gareau examines a harrowing array of human rights abuses by US-supported dictators, governments and paramilitary groups against their own peoples. He shows that state and para-statal forces committed by far the greatest proportion of violence, and that these state repressions were perpetrated with Washington's full awareness, complicity, and military and politico-diplomatic support, if not at its instigation.

Japan in War and Peace

Essays on History, Culture and Race

Author: John W. Dower

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780006863465

Category: Japan

Page: 368

View: 797

This collection of essays highlights the resemblances between wartime, postwar and contemporary Japan. The essays are particularly concerned with the nature of Japanese capitalism and the country's nationalistic doctrines of racial superiority.

Harry S. Truman and the War Scare of 1948

A Successful Campaign to Deceive the Nation

Author: Frank Kofsky

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312123291

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 4887

Kofsky reveals how Truman and the two most important members of his cabinet, Marshall and Forrestall, systematically deceived Congress and the public into thinking that the USSR was about to start World War III.

The End of Victory Culture

Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation

Author: Tom Engelhardt

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558495869

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 1067

In a substantial new afterword to his classic account of the collapse of American triumphalism in the wake of World War II, Tom Engelhardt carries that story into the twenty-first century. He explores how, in the aftermath of September 11, 2001, the younger George Bush headed for the Wild West (Osama bin Laden, Wanted, Dead or Alive); how his administration brought victory culture roaring back as part of its Global War on Terror and its rush to invade Saddam Hussein's Iraq; and how, from its Mission Accomplished moment on, its various stories of triumph crashed and burned in that land.

The Myth of the Addicted Army

Vietnam and the Modern War on Drugs

Author: Jeremy Kuzmarov

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 1558497056

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 1744

The image of the drug-addicted American soldier--disheveled, glassy-eyed, his uniform adorned with slogans of antiwar dissent--has long been associated with the Vietnam War. More specifically, it has persisted as an explanation for the U.S. defeat, the symbol of a demoralized army incapable of carrying out its military mission. Yet as Jeremy Kuzmarov documents in this deeply researched book, popular assumptions about drug use in Vietnam are based more on myth than fact. Not only was alcohol the intoxicant of choice for most GIs, but the prevalence of other drugs varied enormously. Although marijuana use among troops increased over the course of the war, for the most part it remained confined to rear areas, and the use of highly addictive drugs like heroin was never as widespread as many imagined. Like other cultural myths that emerged from the war, the concept of an addicted army was first advanced by war hawks seeking a scapegoat for the failure of U.S. policies in Vietnam, in this case one that could be linked to "permissive" liberal social policies and the excesses of the counterculture. But conservatives were not alone. Ironically, Kuzmarov shows, elements of the antiwar movement also promoted the myth, largely because of a presumed alliance between Asian drug traffickers and the Central Intelligence Agency. While this claim was not without foundation, as new archival evidence confirms, the left exaggerated the scope of addiction for its own political purposes. Exploiting bipartisan concern over the perceived "drug crisis," the Nixon administration in the early 1970s launched a bold new program of federal antidrug measures, especially in the international realm. Initially, the "War on Drugs" helped divert attention away from the failed quest for "peace with honor" in Southeast Asia. But once institutionalized, it continued to influence political discourse as well as U.S. drug policy in the decades that followed.

What Every Person Should Know About War

Author: Chris Hedges

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781416583141

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 1954

Acclaimed New York Times journalist and author Chris Hedges offers a critical -- and fascinating -- lesson in the dangerous realities of our age: a stark look at the effects of war on combatants. Utterly lacking in rhetoric or dogma, this manual relies instead on bare fact, frank description, and a spare question-and-answer format. Hedges allows U.S. military documentation of the brutalizing physical and psychological consequences of combat to speak for itself. Hedges poses dozens of questions that young soldiers might ask about combat, and then answers them by quoting from medical and psychological studies. • What are my chances of being wounded or killed if we go to war? • What does it feel like to get shot? • What do artillery shells do to you? • What is the most painful way to get wounded? • Will I be afraid? • What could happen to me in a nuclear attack? • What does it feel like to kill someone? • Can I withstand torture? • What are the long-term consequences of combat stress? • What will happen to my body after I die? This profound and devastating portrayal of the horrors to which we subject our armed forces stands as a ringing indictment of the glorification of war and the concealment of its barbarity.

Hiroshima

Why America Dropped the Atomic Bomb

Author: Ronald Takaki

Publisher: Back Bay Books

ISBN: 9780316831246

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 4960

The bombing of Hiroshima was one of the pivotal events of the twentieth century, yet this controversial question remains unresolved. At the time, General Dwight Eisenhower, General Douglas MacArthur, and chief of staff Admiral William Leahy all agreed that an atomic attack on Japanese cities was unnecessary. All of them believed that Japan had already been beaten and that the war would soon end. Was the bomb dropped to end the war more quickly? Or did it herald the start of the Cold War? In his probing new study, prizewinning historian Ronald Takaki explores these factors and more. He considers the cultural context of race - the ways in which stereotypes of the Japanese influenced public opinion and policymakers - and also probes the human dimension. Relying on top secret military reports, diaries, and personal letters, Takaki relates international policies to the individuals involved: Los Alamos director J. Robert Oppenheimer, Secretary of State James Byrnes, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, and others... but above all, Harry Truman.

The United States of Fear

Author: Tom Engelhardt

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608461548

Category: Political Science

Page: 222

View: 8919

With piercing wit and brutal insight, Tom Engelhardt tours the future ruins of the American empire.

They Were Soldiers

How the Wounded Return from America's Wars: The Untold Story

Author: Ann Jones

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN: 1608463877

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 6601

"Unsparing, scathingly direct, and gut-wrenching."—Andrew Bacevich "Jones writes with passion and clarity."—Marilyn Young "Read this book."—Jonathan Shay Ann Jones shows the dead, wounded, mutilated, brain-damaged, drug-addicted, suicidal, homicidal casualties of our distant wars, taking us on a stunning journey from the devastating moment an American soldier is first wounded in rural Afghanistan to the return home. Beautifully written by an empathetic and critical reporter who knows the price of war. Ann Jones is a journalist, photographer, and the author of eight books of nonfiction.

The Deluge

The Great War, America and the Remaking of the Global Order, 1916-1931

Author: Adam Tooze

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN: 0143127977

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 5560

"A searing and highly original analysis of the First World War and its anguished aftermath. In the depths of the Great War, with millions dead and no imaginable end to the conflict, societies around the world began to buckle. The heart of the financial system shifted from London to New York. The infinite demands for men and materiel reached into countries far from the front. The strain of the war ravaged all economic and political assumptions, bringing unheard-of changes in the social and industrial order. A century after the outbreak of fighting, Adam Tooze revisits this seismic moment in history, challenging the existing narrative of the war, its peace, and its aftereffects. From the day the United States enters the war in 1917 to the precipice of global financial ruin, Tooze delineates the world remade by American economic and military power. Tracing the ways in which countries came to terms with America's centrality--including the slide into fascism--The Deluge is a chilling work of great originality that will fundamentally change how we view the legacy of World War I"--

The Better Angels of Our Nature

Why Violence Has Declined

Author: Steven Pinker

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN: 0143122010

Category: Psychology

Page: 802

View: 2575

Presents a controversial history of violence which argues that today's world is the most peaceful time in human existence, drawing on psychological insights into intrinsic values that are causing people to condemn violence as an acceptable measure.

The New Serfdom

Author: Angela Eagle,Imran Ahmed

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN: 1785903144

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 514

Great Britain is one of the wealthiest, most successful nations in the world. Why, then, do so many people feel short-changed? The old assumption that ‘if you work hard and play by the rules, you can get on in life’ looks increasingly like a cruel joke. Homeownership, secure employment and fair wages seem like relics of a bygone era. Meanwhile exploitative workplace practices have created a new serfdom, leaving many people trapped in unfulfilling, underpaid work. At a time of huge political upheaval and ever-increasing inequality, this powerful new book asks: how can we build a successful economy, powered by a happy and productive workforce that benefits everyone in the twenty-first century?

Destroying a Nation

The Civil War in Syria

Author: Nikolaos Van Dam

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 1786722488

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 4486

Following the Arab Spring, Syria descended into civil and sectarian conflict. It has since become a fractured warzone which operates as a breeding ground for new terrorist movements including ISIS as well as the root cause of the greatest refugee crisis in modern history. In this book, former Special Envoy of the Netherlands to Syria Nikolaos van Dam explains the recent history of Syria, covering the growing disenchantment with the Assad regime, the chaos of civil war and the fractures which led to the rise and expansion of ISIS. Through an in-depth examination of the role of sectarian, regional and tribal loyalties in Syria, van Dam traces political developments within the Assad regime and the military and civilian power elite from the Arab Spring to the present day.

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