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The Yankee Way

Playing, Coaching, and My Life in Baseball

Author: Willie Randolph

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 244

Legendary New York Yankee Willie Randolph tells the story of his life playing and coaching for the most storied professional sports franchise in the world, detailing his career on and off the field with some of baseball biggest stars. In his long-awaited memoir, Willie Randolph shares stories from life in New York Yankee pinstripes, opening up about the team that raised him and the city that molded him. For over thirty years, Randolph has been a part of Yankee lore and mythology. From the best seat in the stadium he has witnessed the greats, from Reggie Jackson to Don Mattingly to Derek Jeter; larger-than-life managers, including Billy Martin and Joe Torre; and of course The Boss himself. Randolph offers truly unique, firsthand insight into some of the greatest players to ever play the game and the greatest teams ever to call the Bronx their home. But though Randolph is a Yankee, he is first and foremost a quintessential New Yorker. Brooklyn born and raised, he shares memories of his rise from the projects to the house that Ruth built. Along the way he discusses, his triumphs and struggles on the field and in the dugout, as well as his time spent as manager of the Yankees’ crosstown rivals, the Mets. As fascinating and thoughtful as Randolph himself, filled with sixteen pages of black-and-white photos, The Yankee Way is a moving portrait of a legendary team, a unique city, and a remarkable man. With 16 pages of black & white photos.

The Yankee Way

The Blueprint That Created America

Author: Troy Tyson

Publisher: Courant Publishing, LLC

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 452

How did America become great? How did this country become the most successful, powerful, and prosperous nation in the history of the world? Was it because of the nation's unprecedented founding documents? Was it due to the scores of immigrants from all over the world who brought their dreams and talents to America's shores? Or did America become great, as some contend, through racism, theft, and genocide? Author Troy Tyson proposes a unique argument as to the origins of American greatness: that the country's unparalleled success is a result not of its founding documents, nor its celebrated openness to people of all backgrounds, nor of genocidal tyranny. Rather, The Yankee Way asserts that the nation's great power and success stem primarily from the traits of a comparatively small, peculiar ethnic group from New England known as the Yankees. These traits, which include morality, industriousness, respect for law and order, commitment to education, and dedication to traditional family values, were developed first by the early Puritans of New England, then passed down to their Yankee descendants, who finally embedded them into the cultural DNA of the United States. The Yankee Way explores, in fascinating detail, the history of the Yankees, and the process by which they created modern America and instilled within it their distinct cultural characteristics. Further, though, the book serves as a warning to Americans as to what the future might hold, as the nation rapidly moves away from this critical cultural inheritance, and leaves The Yankee Way behind.

The Yankee Way B&N Signed Edition

Playing, Coaching, and My Life in Baseball

Author: Willie Randolph

Publisher: It Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 136

From a dusty diamond in Brooklyn to the hallowed grounds of Yankee Stadium, Willie Randolph has always loved the game of baseball, and over the course of his storied career, he has amassed a remarkable list of accomplishments—All-Star second baseman, World Series champion, manager—but, above all, he has been a Yankee. For almost thirty years, Randolph was a part of Yankee lore and mythology, whether playing with the legends Thurman Munson and Reggie Jackson and witnessing the infamous Bronx Zoo at its rowdiest, or coaching as the Core Four of Derek Jeter, Mariano Rivera, Andy Pettitte, and Jorge Posada rose to fame and ushered in a new era of Yankee dominance. In his long-awaited memoir, Willie Randolph shares stories from his life in pinstripes, opening up about the team that raised him and the city that molded him. With unparalleled perspective into three generations of team history, the former Yankee captain offers fresh, firsthand insight into some of the greatest players to ever play the game and the greatest teams ever to call the Bronx their home. From Don Mattingly to Bernie Williams, Goose Gossage to Mariano Rivera, and Billy Martin to Joe Torre, Randolph presents a view of baseball history from the inside, describing how teams became dynasties and managers became legends—all in the shadow of the man who brought them together, the Boss, George Steinbrenner. But though Randolph is a Yankee through and through, he is first and foremost a quintessential New Yorker. Brooklyn raised and groomed, he shares memories of a rise that could only happen in the Big Apple—from the projects of East New York to the house that Ruth built. Along the way, he discusses his triumphs and struggles on and off the field, as well as his time spent as manager of the Mets. As fascinating and thoughtful as Randolph himself, The Yankee Way is a moving portrait of a legendary team, a unique city, and a remarkable man.

The Yankees in the Early 1960s

Author: William J. Ryczek

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 267

View: 472

This is a history of the New York Yankees over a decade which saw them at the top of the American League and at the bottom. Based upon thorough background research and interviews with over 100 former players, the book covers the major stories of the period as well as some not seen elsewhere. The seventh games of the 1960 and 1962 World Series are described in detail, replete with the remembrances of many of the participants. The infamous Phil Linz harmonica incident, the fruitless search for another Mickey Mantle and the surprising emergence of Mel Stottlemyre are some of the stories that make the early ’60s such a fascinating era in Yankee lore.

The Yankee Chick's Survival Guide to Texas

Author: Sophia Dembling

Publisher: Taylor Trade Publications

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 232

View: 752

In Texas "Yankee" is a loose term covering a lot of ground. If you're not a Texan or a southerner, you're a Yankee and therefore, to many Texans, suspect. There are many rites of passage to being a Yankee in Texas: the first time you spot a pickup with a gun rack; the first time you realize that a week is a long time to go without Mexican food; the first time you recognize a change in seasons; your first thunderstorm; your first honky-tonk. Culture Shock in Texas can be intense and is exacerbate by local rules of propriety that tell us to keep out mouths shut. But here in this book we are going to talk all about it with good old Yankee outspokenness. We'll clear the air, share experiences, orient newcomers, and have some good laughs.

The Yankee Way to Simplify Your Life

Old-Fashioned Wisdom For A New-fangled World

Author: Yankee Magazine

Publisher: William Morrow

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 272

View: 374

The Yankee Way to Simplify Your Life is a quirky, witty and pragmatic guide to the sort of life simplification we all dream about. Jay Heinrichs and the Editors of Yankee magazine show us precisely how we can begin to pare down our lives and practice a little old-fashioned Yankee ingenuity to manage our time and lead a simpler, more productive life. The early New Englanders knew how and when to be satisfied. Rarely feeling sorry for themselves, they had a clear sense of place and how they fit into it. As Heinrichs, notes, we can benefit from their sensible attitudes, practicing a little "Yankeefication," which we can accomplish without actually moving to rural New England. In The Yankee Way to Simplify Your Life, Heinrichs offers a variety of practical and unusual ways to begin practicing Yankee ingenuity. He shows us how we can:--convert desires into goals and transform negative experiences into the seeds of personal success (much like Daniel Webster, whose childhood rickets made his forehead protrude, giving him a prominent brow that many found godlike later in his life). --improve our weaknesses and develop strengths systematically (much like Benjamin Franklin, who decided elaborate charts would lead to moral perfection; of the thirteen virtues he charted, he only failed with "Chastity," though he ended "a better and a happier man" than he would have otherwise).

The Galaxy

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 138

Billy Martin

Baseball's Flawed Genius

Author: Bill Pennington

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 604

View: 543

A New York Times bestseller “Enormously entertaining . . . Explores the question of whether a baseball lifer can actually be a tragic figure in the classic sense—a man destroyed by the very qualities that made him great." — Wall Street Journal “Bill Pennington gives long-overdue flesh to the caricature . . . Pennington savors the dirt-kicking spectacles without losing sight of the man.” — New York Times Book Review Even now, years after his death, Billy Martin remains one of the most intriguing and charismatic figures in baseball history. And the most misunderstood. A manager who is widely considered to have been a baseball genius, Martin is remembered more for his rabble-rousing and public brawls on the field and off. He was combative and intimidating, yet endearing and beloved. ​In Billy Martin, Bill Pennington resolves these contradictions and pens the definitive story of Martin’s life. From his hardscrabble youth to his days on the Yankees in the 1950s and through sixteen years of managing, Martin made sure no one ever ignored him. Drawing on exhaustive interviews and his own time covering Martin as a young sportswriter, Pennington provides an intimate, revelatory, and endlessly colorful story of a truly larger-than-life sportsman. “The hair on my forearms was standing up by the end of the fifth paragraph of this book’s introduction. I knew Billy Martin. I covered Billy Martin. But I never knew him like this.” — Dan Shaughnessy, best-selling author of Francona “An exhaustive, detailed and fascinating look at a baseball genius whose biggest fight might very well have been against himself.” — Tampa Tribune

Joe McCarthy

Architect of the Yankee Dynasty

Author: Alan H. Levy

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 435

View: 465

Joe McCarthy was headed towards a career as a plumber—until the parish priest intervened, and convinced McCarthy’s mother that he could make more of himself in baseball. She relented, and Joseph Vincent McCarthy embarked on a career that ranks him among the greatest managers ever. In 24 years his teams took nine pennants, seven World Series titles, and never finished lower than fourth. This biography of Joe McCarthy details the 90–year life of one of the greatest managers in baseball’s history. Baseball was McCarthy’s ticket out of a working-class existence in Germantown, Pennsylvania, taking him to college, the minor leagues, managerial stints in baseball’s backwaters, and on to remarkable years with the Yankees, Cubs and Red Sox—years filled with triumph and heartbreak. Seven championships and the highest managerial winning percentage ever earned him entry to the Hall of Fame, but McCarthy will always be remembered for his deft handling of his players. McCarthy’s ability to handle even “unmanageable” players won him the respect of all. His effect on the lives of his young charges was, in his mind, his greatest legacy.

Liberalism and the Problem of Knowledge

A New Rhetoric for Modern Democracy

Author: Charles Arthur Willard

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 384

View: 265

In this witty and provocative study of democracy and its critics, Charles Willard debunks liberalism, arguing that its exaggerated ideals of authenticity, unity, and community have deflected attention from the pervasive incompetence of "the rule of experts." He proposes a ground of communication that emphasizes common interests rather than narrow disputes. The problem of "unity" and the public sphere has driven a wedge between libertarians and communitarians. To mediate this conflict, Willard advocates a shift from the discourse of liberalism to that of epistemics. As a means of organizing the ebb and flow of consensus, epistemics regards democracy as a family of knowledge problems—as ways of managing discourse across differences and protecting multiple views. Building a bridge between warring peoples and warring paradigms, this book also reminds those who presume to instruct government that they are obliged to enlighten it, and that to do so requires an enlightened public discourse.

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