Search Results: vietnam-a-television-history-roots-of-war

Vietnam, a Television History: Roots of war

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 4439

The Vietnam War

An Intimate History

Author: Geoffrey C. Ward

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0307700259

Category: History

Page: 612

View: 2267

"A comprehensive look at the Vietnam War"--

Why Viet Nam?

Prelude to America's Albatross

Author: Archimedes L. A. Patti

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520041561

Category: United States

Page: 612

View: 2482

Vietnam, a History

Author: Stanley Karnow

Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)

ISBN: 9780140265477

Category: History

Page: 768

View: 9055

"The most comprehensive, up-to-date, and balanced account we have."--Boston Globe. "Superb, balanced in interpretation... immensely readable and full of new and interesting detail."--George Herring, Univ. of Kentucky.

Bring the War Home

The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America

Author: Kathleen Belew

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674984927

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 8960

The white power movement in America wants a revolution. It has declared all-out war against the federal government and its agents, and has carried out—with military precision—an escalating campaign of terror against the American public. Its soldiers are not lone wolves but are highly organized cadres motivated by a coherent and deeply troubling worldview of white supremacy, anticommunism, and apocalypse. In Bring the War Home, Kathleen Belew gives us the first full history of the movement that consolidated in the 1970s and 1980s around a potent sense of betrayal in the Vietnam War and made tragic headlines in the 1995 bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building. Returning to an America ripped apart by a war that, in their view, they were not allowed to win, a small but driven group of veterans, active-duty personnel, and civilian supporters concluded that waging war on their own country was justified. They unified people from a variety of militant groups, including Klansmen, neo-Nazis, skinheads, radical tax protestors, and white separatists. The white power movement operated with discipline and clarity, undertaking assassinations, mercenary soldiering, armed robbery, counterfeiting, and weapons trafficking. Its command structure gave women a prominent place in brokering intergroup alliances and giving birth to future recruits. Belew’s disturbing history reveals how war cannot be contained in time and space. In its wake, grievances intensify and violence becomes a logical course of action for some. Bring the War Home argues for awareness of the heightened potential for paramilitarism in a present defined by ongoing war.

New Challenges for Documentary

Second Edition

Author: Alan Rosenthal,John Corner

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719068997

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 507

View: 5849

The first edition of this book provided a major stimulus for teaching about documentary film and television and fresh encouragement for critical thinking about practice. This second edition brings together many new contributions both from academics and filmmakers, reflecting shifts both in documentary production itself, and in ways of discussing it. Once again, the emphasis has been on clear and provocative writing, sympathetic to the practical challenges of documentary filmmaking but making connections with a range of work in media and communications analysis.With its wide range of contributors and the international scope of its agenda, this will be essential reading for general filmmakers and documentary students both of academic and practical inclinations.

They Marched Into Sunlight

War and Peace Vietnam and America October 1967

Author: David Maraniss

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743261043

Category: History

Page: 572

View: 2617

Focuses on a crucial two-day battle in Vietnam that was also marked by an ill-fated protest by University of Wisconsin students at the Dow Chemical Company, in an hour-by-hour narrative.

Inspired by True Events

An Illustrated Guide to More Than 500 History-Based Films

Author: Robert James Niemi

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610691989

Category: History

Page: 607

View: 9436

An up-to-date and indispensable guide for film history buffs of all kind, this book surveys more than 500 major films based on true stories and historical subject matter.

A Sense of Power

The Roots of America's World Role

Author: John A. Thompson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501701770

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 405

Why has the United States assumed so extensive and costly a role in world affairs over the last hundred years? The two most common answers to this question are "because it could" and "because it had to." Neither answer will do, according to this challenging re-assessment of the way that America came to assume its global role. The country's vast economic resources gave it the capacity to exercise great influence abroad, but Americans were long reluctant to meet the costs of wielding that power. Neither the country's safety from foreign attack nor its economic well-being required the achievement of ambitious foreign policy objectives. In A Sense of Power, John A. Thompson takes a long view of America's dramatic rise as a world power, from the late nineteenth century into the post–World War II era. How, and more importantly why, has America come to play such a dominant role in world affairs? There is, he argues, no simple answer. Thompson challenges conventional explanations of America's involvement in World War I and World War II, seeing neither the requirements of national security nor economic interests as determining. He shows how American leaders from Wilson to Truman developed an ever more capacious understanding of the national interest, and why by the 1940s most Americans came to support the price tag, in blood and treasure, attached to strenuous efforts to shape the world. The beliefs and emotions that led them to do so reflected distinctive aspects of U.S. culture, not least the strength of ties to Europe. Consciousness of the nation’s unique power fostered feelings of responsibility, entitlement, and aspiration among the people and leaders of the United States. This original analysis challenges some widely held beliefs about the determinants of United States foreign policy and will bring new insight to contemporary debates about whether the nation should—or must—play so active a part in world politics.

Vietnam

Anthology and Guide to a Television History

Author: Steven Cohen

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages

ISBN: 9780075544296

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 2957

Encyclopedia of Politics

The Left and the Right

Author: Rodney P. Carlisle

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1452265313

Category: Political Science

Page: 1088

View: 2411

Although the distinction between the politics of the left and the right is commonly assumed in the media and in treatments of political science and history, the terms are used so loosely that the student and the general reader are often confused: What exactly are the terms left and right supposed to imply? This two-volume Encyclopedia of Politics: The Left and the Right contains over 450 articles on individuals, movements, political parties, and ideological principles, with those usually thought of as left in the left-hand volume (Volume 1), and those considered on the right in the right-hand volume (Volume 2).

A Voice from the Vietnam War

Author: Russell H. Coward

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313325861

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 185

View: 8937

Provides the personal experiences and memories of an Air Force enlisted man who taught English to South Vietnamese officers during the Vietnam War.

A Question of Torture

CIA Interrogation, from the Cold War to the War on Terror

Author: Alfred McCoy

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 9781429900683

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8570

A startling exposé of the CIA's development and spread of psychological torture, from the Cold War to Abu Ghraib and beyond In this revelatory account of the CIA's secret, fifty-year effort to develop new forms of torture, historian Alfred W. McCoy uncovers the deep, disturbing roots of recent scandals at Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo. Far from aberrations, as the White House has claimed, A Question of Torture shows that these abuses are the product of a long-standing covert program of interrogation. Developed at the cost of billions of dollars, the CIA's method combined "sensory deprivation" and "self-inflicted pain" to create a revolutionary psychological approach—the first innovation in torture in centuries. The simple techniques—involving isolation, hooding, hours of standing, extremes of hot and cold, and manipulation of time—constitute an all-out assault on the victim's senses, destroying the basis of personal identity. McCoy follows the years of research—which, he reveals, compromised universities and the U.S. Army—and the method's dissemination, from Vietnam through Iran to Central America. He traces how after 9/11 torture became Washington's weapon of choice in both the CIA's global prisons and in "torture-friendly" countries to which detainees are dispatched. Finally McCoy argues that information extracted by coercion is worthless, making a case for the legal approach favored by the FBI. Scrupulously documented and grippingly told, A Question of Torture is a devastating indictment of inhumane practices that have spread throughout the intelligence system, damaging American's laws, military, and international standing.

Tangled Memories

The Vietnam War, the AIDS Epidemic, and the Politics of Remembering

Author: Marita Sturken

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520918122

Category: Social Science

Page: 375

View: 9024

Analyzing the ways U.S. culture has been formed and transformed in the 80s and 90s by its response to the Vietnam War and the AIDS epidemic, Marita Sturken argues that each has disrupted our conventional notions of community, nation, consensus, and "American culture." She examines the relationship of camera images to the production of cultural memory, the mixing of fantasy and reenactment in memory, the role of trauma and survivors in creating cultural comfort, and how discourses of healing can smooth over the tensions of political events. Sturken's discussion encompasses a brilliant comparison of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the AIDS Quilt; her profound reading of the Memorial as a national wailing wall—one whose emphasis on the veterans and war dead has allowed the discourse of heroes, sacrifice, and honor to resurface at the same time that it is an implicit condemnation of war—is particularly compelling. The book also includes discussions of the Kennedy assassination, the Persian Gulf War, the Challenger explosion, and the Rodney King beating. While debunking the image of the United States as a culture of amnesia, Sturken also shows how remembering itself is a form of forgetting, and how exclusion is a vital part of memory formation.

The Mayo Clinic

Faith, Hope, Science

Author: David Blistein,Ken Burns

Publisher: RosettaBooks

ISBN: 1948122294

Category: Medical

Page: 144

View: 860

Based on the PBS documentary by Ken Burns, Erik Ewers, and Christopher Loren Ewers airing September 25. On September 30, 1889, W.W. Mayo and his sons Will and Charlie performed the very first operation at a brand-new Catholic hospital in Rochester, Minnesota. It was called Saint Marys. The hospital arose out of the devastation of a tornado that had struck the town six years earlier. After the storm, Mother Alfred Moes of the Sisters of Saint Francis told the Mayos that she had a vision of building a hospital that would “become world renowned for its medical arts.” Based on the film by acclaimed documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, The Mayo Clinic: Faith, Hope, Science chronicles the history of this unique organization, from its roots as an unlikely partnership between a country doctor and a Franciscan order of nuns to its position today as a worldwide model for patient care, research, and education. Featuring more than 400 compelling archival and modern images, as well as the complete script from the film, the book demonstrates how the institution’s remarkable 150-year history continues to inspire the way medicine is practiced there today. In addition, a series of case studies reveals patients, doctors, and nurses in their most private moments as together they face difficult diagnoses and embark on uncertain treatments. The film and this companion book tell the story of an organization that has managed to stay true to its primary value—the needs of the patient come first. Together, they make an important contribution to the critical discussions about the delivery of health care today in America…and the world.

Theorizing Documentary

Author: Michael Renov

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135213097

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 5207

A key collection of essays that looks at the specific issues related to the documentary form. Questions addressed include `What is documentary?' and `How fictional is nonfiction?'

Nothing Ever Dies

Author: Viet Thanh Nguyen

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 067466034X

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 1269

Nothing Ever Dies, Viet Thanh Nguyen writes. All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory. From the author of the bestselling novel The Sympathizer comes a searching exploration of a conflict that lives on in the collective memory of both the Americans and the Vietnamese.

The Concise Untold History of the United States

Author: Oliver Stone,Peter Kuznick

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476791678

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 7364

A companion to Oliver Stone’s ten-part documentary series of the same name, this guide offers a people’s history of the American Empire: “a critical overview of US foreign policy…indispensable” (former Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev); “brilliant, a masterpiece!” (Daniel Ellsberg); “Oliver Stone’s new book is as riveting, eye-opening, and thought-provoking as any history book you will ever read. It achieves what history, at its best, ought to do: presents a mountain of previously unknown facts that makes you question and re-examine many of your long-held assumptions about the most influential events” (Glenn Greenwald). In November 2012, Showtime debuted a ten-part documentary series based on Oliver Stone and Peter Kuznick’s The Untold History of the United States. The book and documentary looked back at human events that, at the time, went underreported, but also crucially shaped America’s unique and complex history over the twentieth century. From the atomic bombing of Japan to the Cold War and fall of Communism, this concise version of the larger book is adapted for the general reader. Complete with poignant photos, arresting illustrations, and little-known documents, The Concise Untold History of the United States covers the rise of the American empire and national security state from the late nineteenth century through the Obama administration, putting it all together to show how deeply rooted the seemingly aberrant policies of the Bush-Cheney administration are in the nation’s past and why it has proven so difficult for Obama to change course. In this concise and indispensible guide, Kuznick and Stone (who Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Garry Wills has called America’s own “Dostoevsky behind a camera”) challenge prevailing orthodoxies to reveal the dark truth about the rise and fall of American imperialism.

Eisenhower

In War and Peace

Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 140006693X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 950

View: 800

In his magisterial bestseller "FDR," Smith provided a fresh, modern look at one of the most indelible figures in American history. Now this peerless biographer returns with a new life of Dwight D. Eisenhower that is as full, rich, and revealing as anything ever written about America's 34th president.

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