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Washington's Spies

The Story of America's First Spy Ring

Author: Alexander Rose

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 134

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Turn: Washington’s Spies, now an original series on AMC Based on remarkable new research, acclaimed historian Alexander Rose brings to life the true story of the spy ring that helped America win the Revolutionary War. For the first time, Rose takes us beyond the battlefront and deep into the shadowy underworld of double agents and triple crosses, covert operations and code breaking, and unmasks the courageous, flawed men who inhabited this wilderness of mirrors—including the spymaster at the heart of it all. In the summer of 1778, with the war poised to turn in his favor, General George Washington desperately needed to know where the British would strike next. To that end, he unleashed his secret weapon: an unlikely ring of spies in New York charged with discovering the enemy’s battle plans and military strategy. Washington’s small band included a young Quaker torn between political principle and family loyalty, a swashbuckling sailor addicted to the perils of espionage, a hard-drinking barkeep, a Yale-educated cavalryman and friend of the doomed Nathan Hale, and a peaceful, sickly farmer who begged Washington to let him retire but who always came through in the end. Personally guiding these imperfect everyday heroes was Washington himself. In an era when officers were gentlemen, and gentlemen didn’ t spy, he possessed an extraordinary talent for deception—and proved an adept spymaster. The men he mentored were dubbed the Culper Ring. The British secret service tried to hunt them down, but they escaped by the closest of shaves thanks to their ciphers, dead drops, and invisible ink. Rose’s thrilling narrative tells the unknown story of the Revolution–the murderous intelligence war, gunrunning and kidnapping, defectors and executioners—that has never appeared in the history books. But Washington’s Spies is also a spirited, touching account of friendship and trust, fear and betrayal, amid the dark and silent world of the spy. From the Hardcover edition.

Summary and Analysis of Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring

Based on the Book by Alexander Rose

Author: Worth Books

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 30

View: 296

So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of Washington’s Spies tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Alexander Rose’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of Washington’s Spies includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter overviews Profiles of the main characters Detailed timeline of key events Important quotes Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring by Alexander Rose: Alexander Rose’s New York Times–bestselling book Washington’s Spies offers an in-depth account of the network of men who operated covertly under George Washington’s command during the Revolutionary War. These men, referred to as the Culper Ring, worked largely in southern New York, sending and receiving coded messages from across Manhattan to Long Island, and getting crucial British intelligence to General Washington. Rose delves into the varied personalities and motivations of the Culper Ring, explores the espionage techniques of the time, including encryption and the use of invisible ink, and describes the differences in the British and American methods of gathering intelligence. Washington’s Spies inspired the television series Turn, with author Alexander Rose serving as a historical consultant and producer. The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.

National Intelligence Systems

Current Research and Future Prospects

Author: Gregory F. Treverton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 307

A series of investigations, especially in Great Britain and the United States, have focused attention on the performance of national intelligence services. At the same time, terrorism and a broad span of trans-national security challenges has highlighted the crucial role of intelligence. This book takes stock of the underlying intellectual sub-structure of intelligence. For intelligence, as for other areas of policy, serious intellectual inquiry is the basis for improving the performance of real-world institutions. The volume explores intelligence from an intellectual perspective, not an organizational one. Instead the book identifies themes that run through these applications, such as the lack of comprehensive theories, the unclear relations between providers and users of intelligence, and the predominance of bureaucratic organizations driven by collection. A key element is the development, or rather non-development, of intelligence toward an established set of methods and standards and, above all, an ongoing scientific discourse.

Spies, Patriots, and Traitors

American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War

Author: Kenneth A. Daigler

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 202

Students and enthusiasts of American history are familiar with the Revolutionary War spies Nathan Hale and Benedict Arnold, but few studies have closely examined the wider intelligence efforts that enabled the colonies to gain their independence. Spies, Patriots, and Traitors provides readers with a fascinating, well-documented, and highly readable account of American intelligence activities during the era of the Revolutionary War, from 1765 to 1783, while describing the intelligence sources and methods used and how our Founding Fathers learned and practiced their intelligence role. The author, a retired CIA officer, provides insights into these events from an intelligence professional’s perspective, highlighting the tradecraft of intelligence collection, counterintelligence, and covert actions and relating how many of the principles of the era’s intelligence practice are still relevant today. Kenneth A. Daigler reveals the intelligence activities of famous personalities such as Samuel Adams, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Nathan Hale, John Jay, and Benedict Arnold, as well as many less well-known figures. He examines the important role of intelligence in key theaters of military operations, such as Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and in General Nathanael Greene’s campaign in South Carolina; the role of African Americans in the era’s intelligence activities; undertakings of networks such as the Culper Ring; and intelligence efforts and paramilitary actions conducted abroad. Spies, Patriots, and Traitors adds a new dimension to our understanding of the American Revolution. The book’s scrutiny of the tradecraft and management of Revolutionary War intelligence activities will be of interest to students, scholars, intelligence professionals, and anyone who wants to learn more about this fascinating era of American history.

An Encyclopedia of American Women at War: From the Home Front to the Battlefields [2 volumes]

Author: Lisa Tendrich Frank

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 804

View: 894

A sweeping review of the role of women within the American military from the colonial period to the present day. • An extensive bibliography offers additional reading and research opportunities • Accessibly written essays introduce the thematic developments of each major conflict in American history • Supporting photographs and illustrations depict key female figures • An informative overview in the frontmatter provides historical context to women's roles in the military

American Rifle

A Biography

Author: Alexander Rose

Publisher: Delacorte Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 798

George Washington insisted that his portrait be painted with one. Daniel Boone created a legend with one. Abraham Lincoln shot them on the White House lawn. And Teddy Roosevelt had his specially customized. Now, in this first-of-its-kind book, historian Alexander Rose delivers a colorful, engrossing biography of an American icon: the rifle. Drawing on the words of soldiers, inventors, and presidents, based on extensive new research, and encompassing the Revolution to the present day, American Rifle is a balanced, wonderfully entertaining history of this most essential firearm and its place in American culture. In the eighteenth century American soldiers discovered that they no longer had to fight in Europe’s time-honored way. With the evolution of the famed “Kentucky” Rifle—a weapon slow to load but devastatingly accurate in the hands of a master—a new era of warfare dawned, heralding the birth of the American individualist in battle. In this spirited narrative, Alexander Rose reveals the hidden connections between the rifle’s development and our nation’s history. We witness the high-stakes international competition to produce the most potent gunpowder . . . how the mysterious arts of metallurgy, gunsmithing, and mass production played vital roles in the creation of American economic supremacy . . . and the ways in which bitter infighting between rival arms makers shaped diplomacy and influenced the most momentous decisions in American history. And we learn why advances in rifle technology and ammunition triggered revolutions in military tactics, how ballistics tests—frequently bizarre—were secretly conducted, and which firearms determined the course of entire wars. From physics to geopolitics, from frontiersmen to the birth of the National Rifle Association, from the battles of the Revolution to the war in Iraq, American Rifle is a must read for history buffs, gun collectors, soldiers—and anyone who seeks to understand the dynamic relationship between the rifle and this nation’s history. From the Hardcover edition.

Bunker Hill

A City, A Siege, A Revolution

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 186

The bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Valiant Ambition, and In the Hurricane's Eye tells the story of the Boston battle that ignited the American Revolution, in this "masterpiece of narrative and perspective." (Boston Globe) Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord. In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists. Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to every aspect of the story. He finds new characters, and new facets to familiar ones. The real work of choreographing rebellion falls to a thirty-three year old physician named Joseph Warren who emerges as the on-the-ground leader of the Patriot cause and is fated to die at Bunker Hill. Others in the cast include Paul Revere, Warren’s fiancé the poet Mercy Scollay, a newly recruited George Washington, the reluctant British combatant General Thomas Gage and his more bellicose successor William Howe, who leads the three charges at Bunker Hill and presides over the claustrophobic cauldron of a city under siege as both sides play a nervy game of brinkmanship for control. With passion and insight, Philbrick reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.

The Culper Ring

The History and Legacy of the Revolutionary Wars Most Famous Spy Ring

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 56

View: 505

*Includes pictures *Includes correspondence between the spy ring and explains the results of their activities *Includes a bibliography for further reading After the siege of Boston forced the British to evacuate that city in March 1776, Continental Army commander George Washington suspected that the British would move by sea to New York City, the next logical target in an attempt to end a colonial insurrection. He thus rushed his army south to defend the city. Washington guessed correctly, but it would be to no avail. Unlike Boston, New York City's terrain featured few defensible positions. The city lacked a high point from which to launch a siege, as the peninsula of Boston was fortunate to have. Moreover, Washington wasn't sure defending the city was necessary, hoping that an expedition launched toward Quebec like the one Benedict Arnold had led in late 1775 would keep the British away from New York anyway. However, Congress thought otherwise, and demanded that Washington defend New York. Washington thus did what he was told, and it nearly resulted in the army's demise. In the summer of 1776, the British conducted the largest amphibious expedition in North America's history at the time, landing over 20,000 troops on Long Island. British General William Howe, who had led the British at Bunker Hill and would later become commander in chief of the armies in North America, easily captured Staten Island, which Washington was incapable of defending without a proper navy. Washington's army attempted to fight, but Washington was badly outmaneuvered, and his army was nearly cut off from escape. The withdrawal across New York City was enormously disorderly, with many of Washington's troops so scared that they deserted. Others were sick as a result of the dysentery and smallpox plaguing the Continental Army in New York. In what was arguably the worst defeat of the Revolution, Washington was ashamed, and he also felt betrayed, by both his troops and Congress. However, unbeknownst to nearly everyone, Washington had some men remain active in New York City: the now famous Culper Ring, one of the Revolution's first major intelligence efforts. The ring consisted mostly of a group of civilians in and around New York City who spied on the British forces and Loyalist Americans and reported what they saw and overheard ultimately to Washington, who took a personal, hands-on approach to their management. After modern histories brought their story more fully to light, these spies have since become the subject (with the historical facts somewhat altered) of a recent hit television show, Turn: Washington's Spies. Without question, the relatively little-known clandestine actions of these patriotic men and women contributed to the eventual victory of the long struggle for American independence, and several good books cover part or all of the history of the Culper Ring. However, the main sources consist of the correspondence, much of which has somehow survived, between the members of the ring and their military handlers. Like other spy tales, theirs is a story of courage fraught with constant suspense at being found out and facing a caught spy's usual fate of imprisonment and execution. Indeed, around the time the ring was being organized, America's most famous spy, Nathan Hale, had been caught with maps of British positions on Long Island in his possession and had been summarily hanged. The Culper Ring: The History and Legacy of the Revolutionary War's Most Famous Spy Ring profiles the members of the ring and their activities. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Culper Ring like never before, in no time at all.

Diary of Agent 355

Mystery Lady of Washington's Culper Spy Ring

Author: Franklin Kirby Edwards

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 211

View: 979

Fans of AMC's TURN: Washington's Spies did not notice in 2014 when a Wall Street tycoon bought an old farmhouse in Brookhaven on Long Island and discovered a priceless manuscript hidden inside, but they should now. Discovery of the two-century-old "Diary of Agent 355," the "Mystery Lady" of George Washington's Culper Spy Ring made Revolutionary-era historians salivate. Ever since Morton Pennypacker first uncovered the Culper spies eight decades ago, historians have endeavored unsuccessfully to discover Agent 355's identity. As the diary's editor states: "Essentially the name of Agent 355 remains the last mystery of the American War of Independence." The crucial role of the Long Island spy ring in winning America's freedom has inspired books and even a popular TV series. True to history, all the era's characters get a new breath of life in this incredible diary: reluctant spy Abraham Woodhull, brainy Anna Strong, guerrilla fighter Caleb Brewster and officious spymaster Colonel Benjamin Tallmadge. On the British side, dashing Major John Andr�, villainous Major John Graves Simcoe and battle-honed Robert Rogers turn up, unforgettably. It is a rare first-person account of a fearless woman's significant contributions to America's revolt against King George III. Her beauty and unique "talents" were first seen by Alexander Hamilton who put her in the spy game in 1775, and later by Woodhull who recruited her into the Culper Ring because he feared for his life. Packed with action and new insights on historical events, among other exciting tales, her diary reveals how she stopped the assassination of a Patriot governor, raided Connecticut's infamous Simsbury Mine prison; saved spy Woodhull from discovery and, according to the diary's editor, singlehandedly halted British defeat of the ill-equipped Continental Army early in the war. With a preface and afterword by the editor and lavishly underpinned with explanatory footnotes, "Diary of Agent 355" is a must read for history buffs. - Pilar Publishing of California.

George Washington, Spymaster

How the Americans Outspied the British and Won the Revolutionary War

Author: Thomas B. Allen

Publisher: National Geographic Soc Childrens books

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 184

View: 213

A biography of Revolutionary War general and first President of the United States, George Washington, focuses on his use of spies to gather intelligence that helped the colonies win the war. Reprint.

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