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White Working Class

Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America

Author: Joan C. Williams

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 192

View: 840

Around the world, populist movements are gaining traction among the white working class. Meanwhile, members of the professional elite—journalists, managers, and establishment politicians—are on the outside looking in, left to argue over the reasons. In White Working Class, Joan C. Williams, described as having “something approaching rock star status” by the New York Times, explains why so much of the elite’s analysis of the white working class is misguided, rooted in class cluelessness. Williams explains that many people have conflated “working class” with “poor”—but the working class is, in fact, the elusive, purportedly disappearing middle class. They often resent the poor and the professionals alike. But they don’t resent the truly rich, nor are they particularly bothered by income inequality. Their dream is not to join the upper middle class, with its different culture, but to stay true to their own values in their own communities—just with more money. While white working-class motivations are often dismissed as racist or xenophobic, Williams shows that they have their own class consciousness. White Working Class is a blunt, bracing narrative that sketches a nuanced portrait of millions of people who have proven to be a potent political force. For anyone stunned by the rise of populist, nationalist movements, wondering why so many would seemingly vote against their own economic interests, or simply feeling like a stranger in their own country, White Working Class will be a convincing primer on how to connect with a crucial set of workers—and voters.

White Working Class, with a New Afterword by the Author

Overcoming Class Cluelessness in America

Author: Joan C. Williams

Publisher: Harvard Business School Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 874

Around the world, populist movements are gaining traction among the white working class. Meanwhile, members of the professional elite--journalists, managers, and establishment politicians--are on the outside looking in, left to argue over the reasons. In White Working Class, Joan C. Williams, described as having "something approaching rock star status" by the New York Times, explains why so much of the elite's analysis of the white working class is misguided, rooted in class cluelessness. Williams explains that many people have conflated "working class" with "poor"--but the working class is, in fact, the elusive, purportedly disappearing middle class. They often resent the poor and the professionals alike. But they don't resent the truly rich, nor are they particularly bothered by income inequality. Their dream is not to join the upper middle class, with its different culture, but to stay true to their own values in their own communities--just with more money. While white working-class motivations are often dismissed as racist or xenophobic, Williams shows that they have their own class consciousness. White Working Class is a blunt, bracing narrative that sketches a nuanced portrait of millions of people who have proven to be a potent political force. For anyone stunned by the rise of populist, nationalist movements, wondering why so many would seemingly vote against their own economic interests, or simply feeling like a stranger in their own country, White Working Class will be a convincing primer on how to connect with a crucial set of workers--and voters.

The Politics of a Majority-Minority Nation

Aging, Diversity, and Immigration

Author: Juan Fernando Torres-Gil, PhD

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 630

"As the twin demographic shifts of population aging and diversity speed forward in America, it is hard to imagine a timelier or more needed work." - Paul Irving, Chairman, Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging This timely and critical book takes on a new phenomenon facing the United States and poses the stark question: Will the United States be prepared by 2050, when its older population doubles and we become a majority-minority society? In the authors’ response, scholars, policy leaders and the public are provided with the background and information that connects these two trends to contemporary public policy debates. Written with clarity and expertise, this book illuminates the changes and challenges that face the nation by concisely addressing a wide range of topics, including immigration reform, the politics of aging, and health and retirement security, and provides a glimpse of how the “next America” might look. The authors draw on current data about longevity, diversity and the growing Hispanic population in particular, to unfold the social, cultural, policy and political implications for an aging and diversifying population. With case studies and real-world examples, the book outlines and analyzes the possible impact of this phenomenon on issues like governance, public benefits, the long term care work force and national security, and builds a broader framework with which to understand them. With combined experience in academia, government and policy advocacy, the authors tackle the dramatic changes occurring across the United States and offer a road map to not only understanding but addressing these challenges and opportunities with reason and responsibility. Key Features: Presents the most current statistics and data on demographics Written by an interdisciplinary team with combined experience in academia, government and policy advocacy Includes case studies and real-world examples to build a broader framework of understanding Addresses social, policy, cultural and political challenges facing a rapidly changing population and offers rational and respectful responses

No Longer Newsworthy

How the Mainstream Media Abandoned the Working Class

Author: Christopher R. Martin

Publisher: ILR Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 392

Until the recent political shift pushed workers back into the media spotlight, the mainstream media had largely ignored this significant part of American society in favor of the moneyed "upscale" consumer for more than four decades. Christopher R. Martin now reveals why and how the media lost sight of the American working class and the effects of it doing so. The damning indictment of the mainstream media that flows through No Longer Newsworthy is a wakeup call about the critical role of the media in telling news stories about labor unions, workers, and working-class readers. As Martin charts the decline of labor reporting from the late 1960s onwards, he reveals the shift in news coverage as the mainstream media abandoned labor in favor of consumer and business interests. When newspapers, especially, wrote off working-class readers as useless for their business model, the American worker became invisible. In No Longer Newsworthy, Martin covers this shift in focus, the loss of political voice for the working class, and the emergence of a more conservative media in the form of Christian television, talk radio, Fox News, and conservative websites. Now, with our fractured society and news media, Martin offers the mainstream media recommendations for how to push back against right-wing media and once again embrace the working class as critical to its audience and its democratic function.

Producers, Parasites, Patriots

Race and the New Right-Wing Politics of Precarity

Author: Daniel Martinez HoSang

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 860

The shifting meaning of race and class in the age of Trump The profound concentration of economic power in the United States in recent decades has produced surprising new forms of racialization. In Producers, Parasites, Patriots, Daniel Martinez HoSang and Joseph E. Lowndes show that while racial subordination is an enduring feature of U.S. political history, it continually changes in response to shifting economic and political conditions, interests, and structures. The authors document the changing politics of race and class in the age of Trump across a broad range of phenomena, showing how new forms of racialization work to alter the economic protections of whiteness while promoting some conservatives of color as models of the neoliberal regime. Through careful analyses of diverse political sites and conflicts—racially charged elections, attacks on public-sector unions, new forms of white precarity, the rise of black and brown political elites, militia uprisings, multiculturalism on the far right—they highlight new, interwoven deployments of race in the ascendant age of inequality. Using the concept of “racial transposition,” the authors demonstrate how racial meanings and signification can be transferred from one group to another to shore up both neoliberalism and racial hierarchy. From the militia movement to the Alt-Right to the mainstream Republican Party, Producers, Parasites, Patriots brings to light the changing role of race in right-wing politics.

Political Tribes

Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 1000

The bestselling author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Yale Law School Professor Amy Chua offers a bold new prescription for reversing our foreign policy failures and overcoming our destructive political tribalism at home Humans are tribal. We need to belong to groups. In many parts of the world, the group identities that matter most – the ones that people will kill and die for – are ethnic, religious, sectarian, or clan-based. But because America tends to see the world in terms of nation-states engaged in great ideological battles – Capitalism vs. Communism, Democracy vs. Authoritarianism, the “Free World” vs. the “Axis of Evil” – we are often spectacularly blind to the power of tribal politics. Time and again this blindness has undermined American foreign policy. In the Vietnam War, viewing the conflict through Cold War blinders, we never saw that most of Vietnam’s “capitalists” were members of the hated Chinese minority. Every pro-free-market move we made helped turn the Vietnamese people against us. In Iraq, we were stunningly dismissive of the hatred between that country’s Sunnis and Shias. If we want to get our foreign policy right – so as to not be perpetually caught off guard and fighting unwinnable wars – the United States has to come to grips with political tribalism abroad. Just as Washington’s foreign policy establishment has been blind to the power of tribal politics outside the country, so too have American political elites been oblivious to the group identities that matter most to ordinary Americans – and that are tearing the United States apart. As the stunning rise of Donald Trump laid bare, identity politics have seized both the American left and right in an especially dangerous, racially inflected way. In America today, every group feels threatened: whites and blacks, Latinos and Asians, men and women, liberals and conservatives, and so on. There is a pervasive sense of collective persecution and discrimination. On the left, this has given rise to increasingly radical and exclusionary rhetoric of privilege and cultural appropriation. On the right, it has fueled a disturbing rise in xenophobia and white nationalism. In characteristically persuasive style, Amy Chua argues that America must rediscover a national identity that transcends our political tribes. Enough false slogans of unity, which are just another form of divisiveness. It is time for a more difficult unity that acknowledges the reality of group differences and fights the deep inequities that divide us.

What Works for Women at Work

Four Patterns Working Women Need to Know

Author: Joan C. Williams

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 670

Up-beat, pragmatic, and chock full of advice, What Works for Women at Work is an indispensable guide for working women. An essential resource for any working woman, What Works for Women at Work is a comprehensive and insightful guide for mastering office politics as a woman. Authored by Joan C. Williams, one of the nation’s most-cited experts on women and work, and her daughter, writer Rachel Dempsey, this unique book offers a multi-generational perspective into the realities of today’s workplace. Often women receive messages that they have only themselves to blame for failing to get ahead—Negotiate more! Stop being such a wimp! Stop being such a witch! What Works for Women at Work tells women it’s not their fault. The simple fact is that office politics often benefits men over women. Based on interviews with 127 successful working women, over half of them women of color, What Works for Women at Work presents a toolkit for getting ahead in today’s workplace. Distilling over 35 years of research, Williams and Dempsey offer four crisp patterns that affect working women: Prove-It-Again!, the Tightrope, the Maternal Wall, and the Tug of War. Each represents different challenges and requires different strategies—which is why women need to be savvier than men to survive and thrive in high-powered careers. Williams and Dempsey’s analysis of working women is nuanced and in-depth, going far beyond the traditional cookie-cutter, one-size-fits-all approaches of most career guides for women. Throughout the book, they weave real-life anecdotes from the women they interviewed, along with quick kernels of advice like a “New Girl Action Plan,” ways to “Take Care of Yourself”, and even “Comeback Lines” for dealing with sexual harassment and other difficult situations.

What Works for Women at Work: A Workbook

Author: Joan C. Williams

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 554

A workbook for women with practical tips, tricks, and strategies for succeeding in the workplace. A companion to the highly successful What Works for Women at Work, this workbook offers women a hands-on guide filled with interactive exercises, self-diagnostic quizzes, and action-oriented strategies for building successful careers. The Workbook helps women understand their work environments and experiences and move up the professional ladder. Readers will discover the four patterns of gender bias—Prove-It-Again, the Tightrope, the Maternal Wall, and the Tug of War—and they can use the toolkit to learn how to navigate the ways these patterns affect their careers. Williams and her co-authors also introduce the new concept of "Gender Judo," which involves doing a masculine thing in a feminine way, in order to avoid a backlash. This interactive Workbook can help any working woman make better choices and offers specific advice on:· - How to write a winning resume - How to succeed on job interviews - How to negotiate salary - How to create a social media network - How to create work-life balance - How to cut through office politics In addition, the best-selling What Works for Women at Work is now available in paperback. This book has already helped thousands of working women successfully navigate gender bias in the workplace. Praised by numerous publications for offering an innovative, practical, and down-to-earth approach, What Works for Women at Work is still the go-to guide for working women. Chock full of insights, What Works for Women at Work: A Workbook will be an indispensable handbook for working women, providing the tools, the tips, and the tactics to get ahead.

Rethinking Commodification

Cases and Readings in Law and Culture

Author: Martha Ertman

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 450

View: 439

In a world that is often ruled by buyers and sellers, those things that are often considered priceless become objects to be marketed and from which to earn a profit.

Education and the Cold War

The Battle for the American School

Author: Andrew Hartman

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 264

View: 844

Shortly after the Russians launched Sputnik in 1957, Hannah Arendt quipped that “only in America could a crisis in education actually become a factor in politics.” The Cold War battle for the American school – dramatized but not initiated by Sputnik – proved Arendt correct. The schools served as a battleground in the ideological conflicts of the 1950s. Beginning with the genealogy of progressive education, and ending with the formation of New Left and New Right thought, Education and the Cold War offers a fresh perspective on the postwar transformation in U.S. political culture by way of an examination of the educational history of that era.

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