Search Results: winthrop-s-journal-history-of-new-england-1630-1649

WINTHROPS JOURNAL

Author: John Winthrop,James Kendall 1834-1927 Hosmer

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN: 9781372478512

Category: History

Page: 406

View: 2015

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Winthrop's journal History of New England 1630-1649

Author: James Kendall Hosmer

Publisher: Рипол Классик

ISBN: 5884346905

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 9456

Winthrop's Journal

"History of New England", 1630-1649

Author: John Winthrop

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Massachusetts

Page: N.A

View: 663

The Journal of John Winthrop, 1630-1649

Author: John Winthrop

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674034389

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 374

View: 6426

For 350 years Governor John Winthrop's journal has been recognized as the central source for the history of Massachusetts in the 1630s and 1640s. Winthrop reported events--especially religious and political events--more fully and more candidly than any other contemporary observer. The governor's journal has been edited and published three times since 1790, but these editions are long outmoded. Richard Dunn and Laetitia Yeandle have now prepared a long-awaited scholarly edition, complete with introduction, notes, and appendices. This full-scale, unabridged edition uses the manuscript volumes of the first and third notebooks (both carefully preserved at the Massachusetts Historical Society), retaining their spelling and punctuation, and James Savage's transcription of the middle notebook (accidentally destroyed in 1825). Winthrop's narrative began as a journal and evolved into a history. As a dedicated Puritan convert, Winthrop decided to emigrate to America in 1630 with members of the Massachusetts Bay Company, who had chosen him as their governor. Just before sailing, he began a day-to-day account of his voyage. He continued his journal when he reached Massachusetts, at first making brief and irregular entries, followed by more frequent writing sessions and contemporaneous reporting, and finally, from 1643 onward, engaging in only irregular writing sessions and retrospective reporting. Naturally he found little good to say about such outright adversaries as Thomas Morton, Roger Williams, and Anne Hutchinson. Yet he was also adept at thrusting barbs at most of the other prominent players: John Endecott, Henry Vane, and Richard Saltonstall, among others. Winthrop built lasting significance into the seemingly small-scale actions of a few thousand colonists in early New England, which is why his journal will remain an important historical source.

THE HISTORY OF NEW ENGLANDFROM 1630 TO 1649

Author: JOHN WINTHROP,ESQ.

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6544

John Winthrop, Oliver Cromwell, and the Land of Promise

Author: Marc Aronson

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618181773

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 205

View: 3438

Looks at how the lives of John Winthrop, governor of Massachusetts, and Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of the Puritan Commonwealth in England, were intertwined at a time of conflict between church and state and between Native and European Americans.

New England Frontier

Puritans and Indians, 1620-1675

Author: Alden T. Vaughan

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806127187

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 5971

In contrast to most accounts of Puritan-Indian relations, "New England Frontier "argues that the first two generations of""Puritan settlers were neither generally hostile toward their""Indian neighbors nor indifferent to their territorial rights.""Rather, American Puritans-especially their political and""religious leaders-sought peaceful and equitable relations""as the first step in molding the Indians into neo-Englishmen.""When accumulated Indian resentments culminated in the""war of 1675, however, the relatively benign intercultural""contact of the preceding fifty-five-year period rapidly declined.""With a new introduction updating developments in""Puritan-Indian studies in the last fifteen years, this third""edition affords the reader a clear, balanced overview of a""complex and sensitive area of American history.""

A Genealogical Dictionary Of The First Settlers Of New England, Showing Three Generations Of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, On The Basis Of Farmer's Register

Author: J. Savage

Publisher: Рипол Классик

ISBN: 5885134758

Category: History

Page: 516

View: 8354

Every Day Life in the Massachusetts Bay Colony

Author: George Francis Dow

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486157857

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3222

Comprehensive, reliable account of 17th-century life in one of the country's earliest settlements. Contemporary records, over 100 historically valuable pictures vividly describe early dwellings, furnishings, medicinal aids, wardrobes, trade, crimes, more.

The New England Merchants in the Seventeenth Century

Author: Bernard Bailyn

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674612808

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 249

View: 9865

By the middle of the eighteenth century the merchants were dominant figures in the northern American colonies, powerful economically, politically, and socially. But in New England this preeminence had not been present in the first years of settlement; it had been achieved in the course of three generations of social development as the merchants often Puritans themselves, rose within the Bible Commonwealths to challenge the domination of the Puritan fathers. In lively detail Mr. Bailyn here presents the struggle of the merchants to achieve full social recognition as their successes in trade and in such industries as fishing and lumbering offered them avenues to power. Surveying the rise of merchant families, he offers a portrait in depth of the emergence of a new social group whose interests and changing social position powerfully affected the developing character of American society. The story of this group is the story of people and of their manyâe"sided interests. The merchants were united by the demands of their common devotion to trade, yet they did not form a socially homogeneous unit. In fact their social differencesâe"created in the confusions and dislocations of the early days of settlement came to play an important role in their business and political activities. Moreover, their commercial ventures, successes, and failures affected their social and political situation. Internationalists by occupation, they were deeply affected by personal relations with Europeans as well as by events in the Old World. Drawing on source material from many fieldsâe"business records, religious and political data, literary remains, and genealogical informationâe"Mr. Bailyn has discovered much that is new about the merchants, and has brought it all together into a composite portrait of our economic founding fathers that is fascinating in itself and that will reorient our thinking about many aspects of early New England history.

After the Siege

A Social History of Boston 1775-1800

Author: Jacqueline Barbara Carr

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781555536299

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 3186

During the late 1770s, Boston's townspeople were struggling to rebuild a community devastated by British occupation, the ensuing siege by the Continental Army, and the Revolutionary war years. After the British attacked Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775, Boston's population plummeted from 15,000 civilians to less than 3,000, property was destroyed and plundered, and the economy was on the verge of collapse. How the once thriving colonial seaport and its demoralized inhabitants recovered in the wake of such demographic, physical, and economic ruin is the subject of this compelling and well-researched work. Drawing on extensive primary sources, including ward tax assessors' Taking Books, church records, census records, birth and marriage records, newspaper accounts, and town directories, Jacqueline Barbara Carr brings to life Boston's remarkable rebirth as a flourishing cosmopolitan city at the dawn of the nineteenth century. She examines this watershed period in the city's social and cultural history from the perspective of the town's ordinary men and women, both white and African American, re-creating the determined community of laborers, artisans, tradesmen, mechanics, and seamen who demonstrated an incredible perseverance in reshaping their shattered town and lives. Filled with fascinating and dramatic stories of hardship, conflict, continuity, and change, the engaging narrative describes how Boston rebounded in less than twenty-five years through the efforts of inhabitants who survived the ordeal of the siege, those who fled British occupation and returned after the war, and the influx of citizens from many different places seeking new opportunities in the growing city. Carr explores the complex forces that drove Boston's transformation, taking into consideration such topics as the built environment and the town's neighborhoods, the impact of town government on peoples' lives, the day-to-day trials of restoring and managing the community, the effect of the postwar economy on work and daily life, and forms of leisure and theater entertainment.

Puritan Family Life

The Diary of Samuel Sewall

Author: Judith S. Graham

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781555535933

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 283

View: 9379

Examines the diary of the prominent Boston jurist, Samuel Sewall, and shows how his descriptions of home and Puritan family life contradict the common understanding of the repressive and joyless Puritan household.

Life and Letters of John Winthrop: Governor of the Massachusetts-Bay Company at Their Emigration to New England, 1630;

Author: Robert Charles Winthrop

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 9781377894836

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 492

View: 3372

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Winthrop's Boston

A Portrait of a Puritan Town, 1630-1649

Author: Darrett B. Rutman

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807839876

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 8783

Winthrop's ideals were quite different from those generally ascribed to him, and the reality in New England was quite different from the ideals. The broad purpose of this analytical and interpretive study is to establish a Winthropian ideal and assess the difference between the ideal and the reality that evolved. It traces Boston's evolution from a community to a viable society. Originally published 1965. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

The Bay Psalm Book

Author: Stephen Daye

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 0557004586

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3610

John Winthrop

America's Forgotten Founding Father

Author: Francis J. Bremer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195179811

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 478

View: 1814

The first full-length biography of the first governor of the Massechusetts Bay Colony delves deeply into the life of this seminal figure in the formation of American society and culture.

Between Land and Sea

The Atlantic Coast and the Transformation of New England

Author: Christopher L. Pastore

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674745469

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 6322

Christopher Pastore traces how Narragansett Bay’s ecology shaped the contours of European habitation, trade, and resource use, and how littoral settlers in turn, over two centuries, transformed a marshy fractal of water and earth into a clearly defined coastline, which proved less able to absorb the blows of human initiative and natural variation.

Three Golden Ages

Discovering the Creative Secrets of Renaissance Florence, Elizabethan England, and America's Founding

Author: Alf J. Mapp

Publisher: Madison Books

ISBN: 146173598X

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 8064

In this intriguing book, best-selling author Alf Mapp, Jr. explores three periods in Western history that exploded with creativity: Elizabethan England, Renaissance Florence, and America's founding. What enabled these societies to make staggering jumps in scientific knowledge, develop new political structures, or create timeless works of art?

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