Search Results: working-toward-whiteness-how-america-s-immigrants-became-white-the-strange-journey-from-ellis-island-to-the-suburbs

Working Toward Whiteness

How America's Immigrants Became White: The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs

Author: David R. Roediger

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 9780786722105

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 4149

How did immigrants to the United States come to see themselves as white? David R. Roediger has been in the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history for decades. He first came to prominence as the author of The Wages of Whiteness, a classic study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, Roediger continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-were once viewed as undesirables by the WASP establishment in the United States. They eventually became part of white America, through the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. Once assimilated as fully white, many of them adopted the racism of those whites who formerly looked down on them as inferior. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants-the real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods-Roediger explores the mechanisms by which immigrants came to enjoy the privileges of being white in America. A disturbing, necessary, masterful history, Working Toward Whiteness uses the past to illuminate the present. In an Introduction to the 2018 edition, Roediger considers the resonance of the book in the age of Trump, showing how Working Toward Whiteness remains as relevant as ever even though most migrants today are not from Europe.

Working Toward Whiteness

How America's Immigrants Became White : the Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs

Author: David R. Roediger

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 9780465070732

Category: History

Page: 339

View: 2637

By an award-winning historian of race and labor, a definitive account of how Ellis Island immigrants became accepted as cultural insiders in America

Working Toward Whiteness

How America's Immigrants Became White: The Strange Journey from Ellis Island to the Suburbs

Author: David R. Roediger

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 078672210X

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5874

At the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history, David R. Roediger is the author of the now-classic The Wages of Whiteness, a study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, he continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how American ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-once occupied a confused racial status in their new country. They eventually became part of white America thanks to the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants--the racist real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods--Roediger explores the murky realities of race in twentieth-century America. A masterful history by an award-winning writer, Working Toward Whiteness charts the strange transformation of these new immigrants into the "white ethnics" of America today.

Roots Too

Author: Matthew Frye JACOBSON

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674039068

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 3821

In the 1970s, white ethnics mobilized around a new version of the epic tale of plucky immigrants making their way in the New World through the sweat of their brow. Although this turn to ethnicity was for many an individual search for familial and psychological identity, Roots Too establishes a broader white social and political consensus arising in response to the political language of the Civil Rights movement.

Are Italians White?

How Race is Made in America

Author: Jennifer Guglielmo,Salvatore Salerno

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136062424

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 600

This dazzling collection of original essays from some of the country's leading thinkers asks the rather intriguing question - Are Italians White? Each piece carefully explores how, when and why whiteness became important to Italian Americans, and the significance of gender, class and nation to racial identity.

How Jews Became White Folks and what that Says about Race in America

Author: Karen Brodkin

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813525907

Category: History

Page: 243

View: 2893

Recounts how Jews assimilated into, and became accepted by, mainstream white society in the later twentieth century, as they lost their working-class orientation

Cousins and Strangers

Spanish Immigrants in Buenos Aires, 1850-1930

Author: Jose C. Moya

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520921535

Category: History

Page: 586

View: 659

More than four million Spaniards came to the Western Hemisphere between the mid-nineteenth century and the Great Depression. Unlike that of most other Europeans, their major destination was Argentina, not the United States. Studies of these immigrants—mostly laborers and peasants—have been scarce in comparison with studies of other groups of smaller size and lesser influence. Presenting original research within a broad comparative framework, Jose C. Moya fills a considerable gap in our knowledge of immigration to Argentina, one of the world's primary "settler" societies. Moya moves deftly between micro- and macro-analysis to illuminate the immigration phenomenon. A wealth of primary sources culled from dozens of immigrant associations, national and village archives, and interviews with surviving participants in Argentina and Spain inform his discussion of the origins of Spanish immigration, residence patterns, community formation, labor, and cultural cognitive aspects of the immigration process. In addition, he provides valuable material on other immigrant groups in Argentina and gives a balanced critique of major issues in migration studies.

How the Irish Became White

Author: Noel Ignatiev

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135070695

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 9177

'...from time to time a study comes along that truly can be called ‘path breaking,’ ‘seminal,’ ‘essential,’ a ‘must read.’ How the Irish Became White is such a study.' John Bracey, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachussetts, Amherst The Irish came to America in the eighteenth century, fleeing a homeland under foreign occupation and a caste system that regarded them as the lowest form of humanity. In the new country – a land of opportunity – they found a very different form of social hierarchy, one that was based on the color of a person’s skin. Noel Ignatiev’s 1995 book – the first published work of one of America’s leading and most controversial historians – tells the story of how the oppressed became the oppressors; how the new Irish immigrants achieved acceptance among an initially hostile population only by proving that they could be more brutal in their oppression of African Americans than the nativists. This is the story of How the Irish Became White.

Whiteness of a Different Color

Author: Matthew Frye Jacobson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674417801

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 4810

America's racial odyssey is the subject of this remarkable work of historical imagination. Matthew Frye Jacobson argues that race resides not in nature but in the contingencies of politics and culture. In ever-changing racial categories we glimpse the competing theories of history and collective destiny by which power has been organized and contested in the United States. Capturing the excitement of the new field of "whiteness studies" and linking it to traditional historical inquiry, Jacobson shows that in this nation of immigrants "race" has been at the core of civic assimilation: ethnic minorities, in becoming American, were re-racialized to become Caucasian.

Hammer and Hoe

Alabama Communists during the Great Depression

Author: Robin D. G. Kelley

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469625490

Category: History

Page: 412

View: 8149

A groundbreaking contribution to the history of the "long Civil Rights movement," Hammer and Hoe tells the story of how, during the 1930s and 40s, Communists took on Alabama's repressive, racist police state to fight for economic justice, civil and political rights, and racial equality. The Alabama Communist Party was made up of working people without a Euro-American radical political tradition: devoutly religious and semiliterate black laborers and sharecroppers, and a handful of whites, including unemployed industrial workers, housewives, youth, and renegade liberals. In this book, Robin D. G. Kelley reveals how the experiences and identities of these people from Alabama's farms, factories, mines, kitchens, and city streets shaped the Party's tactics and unique political culture. The result was a remarkably resilient movement forged in a racist world that had little tolerance for radicals. After discussing the book's origins and impact in a new preface written for this twenty-fifth-anniversary edition, Kelley reflects on what a militantly antiracist, radical movement in the heart of Dixie might teach contemporary social movements confronting rampant inequality, police violence, mass incarceration, and neoliberalism.

Tuning Out Blackness

Race and Nation in the History of Puerto Rican Television

Author: Yeidy M. Rivero

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822335433

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 9424

Tuning Out Blackness fills a glaring omission in U.S. and Latin American television studies by looking at Puerto Rican television. In exploring the political and cultural dynamics that have shaped racial representations in Puerto Rico's commercial media from the late 1940s to the 1990s, Yeidy M. Rivero advances critical discussions about race, ethnicity, and the media. She shows that televisual representations of race have belied the ideology of a racially mixed heritage that pervades Puerto Rico's national culture and positions the island's alleged egalitarianism in opposition to racial conflicts in the United States. White performers in blackface have often portrayed "blackness" in local television productions, while black actors have been largely excluded. Drawing on interviews and archival research, Rivero considers representations of race in Puerto Rico, taking into account how they are intertwined with the island's status as a U.S. commonwealth, its national culture, and its relationship with Cuba before the Cuban Revolution in 1959, as well as with the massive influx of Cuban migrants after 1960. She focuses on locally produced radio and television shows, particular television events, and characters that became popular media icons--from performer Ramn Rivero's use of blackface and "black" voice in the 1940s and 1950s to the battle between black actors and television industry officials over racism in the 1970s to the creation, in the 1990s, of the first Puerto Rican situation comedy featuring a black family. By the 1990s, all of the tv stations on the island were owned by U.S. and multinational corporations. Rivero suggests that in diminishing the role of local television productions in programming, this development threatens to erase a crucial forum for the expression and negotiation of racial tensions.

A Different Mirror

A History of Multicultural America (Revised Edition)

Author: Professor of Ethnic Studies Ronald Takaki,Ronald Takaki

Publisher: eBookIt.com

ISBN: 1456611062

Category: History

Page: 529

View: 568

Takaki traces the economic and political history of Indians, African Americans, Mexicans, Japanese, Chinese, Irish, and Jewish people in America, with considerable attention given to instances and consequences of racism. The narrative is laced with short quotations, cameos of personal experiences, and excerpts from folk music and literature. Well-known occurrences, such as the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, the Trail of Tears, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Japanese internment are included. Students may be surprised by some of the revelations, but will recognize a constant thread of rampant racism. The author concludes with a summary of today's changing economic climate and offers Rodney King's challenge to all of us to try to get along. Readers will find this overview to be an accessible, cogent jumping-off place for American history and political science plus a guide to the myriad other sources identified in the notes.

How Race Survived US History

From Settlement and Slavery to the Obama Phenomenon

Author: David R. Roediger

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781844674343

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 7070

A chronicle of the role of race in U.S. history traces the period between the late-seventeenth century to the post-civil rights decades, examining how race was a progressive part of all aspects of society from politics and economics to migration and globalization.

The Construction of Whiteness

An Interdisciplinary Analysis of Race Formation and the Meaning of a White Identity

Author: Stephen Middleton,David R. Roediger,Donald M. Shaffer

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496805569

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 1095

This volume collects interdisciplinary essays that examine the crucial intersection between whiteness as a privileged racial category and the various material practices (social, cultural, political, and economic) that undergird white ideological influence in America. In truth, the need to examine whiteness as a problem has rarely been grasped outside academic circles. The ubiquity of whiteness—its pervasive quality as an ideal that is at once omnipresent and invisible—makes it the very epitome of the mainstream in America. And yet the undeniable relationship between whiteness and inequality in this country necessitates a thorough interrogation of its formation, its representation, and its reproduction. Essays here seek to do just that work. Editors and contributors interrogate whiteness as a social construct, revealing the underpinnings of narratives that foster white skin as an ideal of beauty, intelligence, and power. Contributors examine whiteness from several disciplinary perspectives, including history, communication, law, sociology, and literature. Its breadth and depth makes The Construction of Whiteness a refined introduction to the critical study of race for a new generation of scholars, undergraduates, and graduate students. Moreover, the interdisciplinary approach of the collection will appeal to scholars in African and African American studies, ethnic studies, cultural studies, legal studies, and more. This collection delivers an important contribution to the field of whiteness studies in its multifaceted impact on American history and culture.

The Wages of Whiteness

Race and the Making of the American Working Class

Author: David R. Roediger

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9781859842409

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 7474

THE WAGES OF WHITENESS provides an original study of the formative years of working-class racism in the United States. In an Afterword to this second edition, Roediger discusses recent studies of whiteness and the changing face of labor itself--then surveys criticism of his work. He accepts the views of some critics but challenges others.

Ain't Nothing LIke the Real Thing

How the Apollo Theater Shaped American Entertainment

Author: National Museum Of African American Hist

Publisher: Smithsonian

ISBN: 1588342697

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 1834

Celebrates the seventy-five years of the Apollo Theater, from the Harlem Renaissance to the present, discussing its significance in African American entertainment and its role in social and political racial issues.

Racecraft

The Soul of Inequality in American Life

Author: Karen E. Fields,Barbara Jeanne Fields

Publisher: Verso Trade

ISBN: 1781683131

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 8625

Challenges popular conceptions about racism to explain its pervasiveness in economic doctrine, politics and everyday thinking, arguing that America must develop a legitimate language for thinking about and discussing inequality in broad terms in order to achieve a post-racial society. Co-written by the author of Free at Last.

Becoming Mexican American

Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945

Author: George J. Sanchez

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0195096487

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 2149

Twentieth century Los Angeles has been the focus of one of the most profound and complex interactions between distinct cultures in U.S. history. In this pioneering study, Sanchez explores how Mexican immigrants "Americanized" themselves in order to fit in, thereby losing part of their own culture.

Amazing Girls of Arizona

True Stories Of Young Pioneers

Author: Jan Cleere

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 146174847X

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 5341

From the Diary of Anne Frank to Anne of Green Gables, young women love to read stories about real girls who faced incredible challenges and shared indelible truths about the human spirit. Jan Cleere has compiled a wonderful collection of such stories, for a wide range of readers from ten-year-old girls to older readers fascinated by women's history. Meet Laurette Lovell, born in 1869 with a severe leg deformity, who at age thirteen started on her path to be a renowned pottery artist and painter. Edith Bass, born in 1896, began wrangling mules before the age of nine, leading pack strings up and down the dangerous paths into the Grand Canyon. These two young women, and nine others, are profiled magnificently alongside historic photographs. Today's readers love to read bold adventures. They'll never forget these stories of real girls who conquered the West in their own style, spending most or all of their childhood in Arizona. Jan Cleere is a historical researcher and the author of More Than Petticoats: Remarkable Nevada Women, among other books. She lives in Oro Valley, Arizona.

Colored White

Transcending the Racial Past

Author: David R. Roediger

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520233417

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 6645

"In this splendid book, David Roediger shows the need for political activism aimed at transforming the social and political meaning of race…. No other writer on whiteness can match Roediger's historical breadth and depth: his grasp of the formative role played by race in the making of the nineteenth century working class, in defining the contours of twentieth-century U.S. citizenship and social membership, and in shaping the meaning of emerging social identities and cultural practices in the twenty-first century."—George Lipsitz, author of The Possessive Investment in Whiteness "David Roediger has been showing us all for years how whiteness is a marked and not a neutral color in the history of the United States. Colored White, with its synthetic sweep and new historical investigations, marks yet another advance. In the burgeoning literature on whiteness, this book stands out for its lucid, unjargonridden, lively prose, its groundedness, its analytic clarity, and its scope."—Michael Rogin, author of Blackface, White Noise

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