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Zen in the Martial Arts

Author: Joe Hyams

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 144

View: 629

"A man who has attained mastery of an art reveals it in his every action."--Samurai Maximum. Under the guidance of such celebrated masters as Ed Parker and the immortal Bruce Lee, Joe Hyams vividly recounts his more than 25 years of experience in the martial arts. In his illuminating story, Hyams reveals to you how the daily application of Zen principles not only developed his physical expertise but gave him the mental discipline to control his personal problems-self-image, work pressure, competition. Indeed, mastering the spiritual goals in martial arts can dramatically alter the quality of your life-enriching your relationships with people, as well as helping you make use of all your abilities.

Zen in the Art of Rhetoric

An Inquiry into Coherence

Author: Mark Lawrence McPhail

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 220

View: 111

Explores relationships between classical and contemporary approaches to rhetoric and their connection to the underlying assumptions at work in Zen Buddhism.

Secrets of the Samurai

The Martial Arts of Feudal Japan

Author: Oscar Ratti

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 400

View: 939

Secrets of the Samurai is the definitive study of the martial arts of feudal Japan, explaining in detail the weapons, techniques, strategies, and principles of combat that made the Japanese warrior a formidable foe. Beginning with a panoramic survey of the tumultuous early struggles of warlords contending for political ascendancy, the work outlines the relentless progression of the military class toward absolute power. In addition to illustrating actual methods of combat, the authors discuss in detail the crucial training necessary to develop a warrior's inner power and to concentrate all his energies into a single force. Secrets of the Samurai is an essential text for anyone with an interest in Japanese combat techniques, weaponry, or military history. This edition also contains a new foreword by Adele Westbrook and numerous previously unpublished illustrations by Oscar Ratti. Chapters include: The Bushi The Heimin The Centers of Martial Instruction Armed Bujutsu Unarmed Bujutsu Control and Power Strategic Principles Morality of Bujutsu

Baseball and Philosophy

Thinking Outside the Batter's Box

Author: Eric Bronson

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 300

View: 392

Baseball and Philosophy brings together two high-powered pastimes: the sport of baseball and the academic discipline of philosophy. Eric Bronson asked eighteen young professors to provide their profound analysis of some aspect of baseball. The result offers surprisingly deep insights into this most American of games. The contributors include many of the leading voices in the burgeoning new field of philosophy of sport, plus a few other talented philosophers with a personal interest in baseball. A few of the contributors are also drawn from academic areas outside philosophy: statistics, law, and history. This volume gives the thoughtful baseball fan substancial material to think more deeply about. What moral issues are raised by the Intentional Walk? Do teams sometimes benefit from the self-interested behavior of their individual members? How can Zen be applied to hitting? Is it ethical to employ deception in sports? Can a game be defined by its written rules or are there also other constraints? What can the U.S. Supreme Court learn from umpiring? Why should baseball be the only industry exempt from antitrust laws? What part does luck play in any game of skill?

Martial Arts in the Modern World

Author: Joseph R. Svinth

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 322

View: 863

Though generally perceived and advertised as means of self-defense, body sculpting, and self-discipline, martial arts are actually social tools that respond to altered physical, social, and psychological environments. This book examines how practitioners have responded to stimuli such as feminism, globalism, imperialism, militarism, nationalism, slavery, and the commercialization of sport.

Breaths

Author: Eleuterio Santiago-Díaz

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 192

View: 377

Breaths is a poetic exploration of Budo (the Japanese martial arts) and Zen. It delves into the relationship between these two traditions and projects their spirit onto the textures of everyday life. The poems balance action, energy, meditation, and contemplation on how to live attentively and actively in the world. Accompanied by Yoshiko Shimano’s eloquent prints, these poems will energize and captivate readers while inviting them to seek their own paths to illumination.

Martial Arts and Philosophy

Beating and Nothingness

Author: Graham Priest

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 382

Socrates, an Athenian soldier, was a calmly efficient killing machine. His student Plato was an accomplished and broad-shouldered wrestler. Martial arts and philosophy have always gone hand in hand, as well as fist in throat. Philosophical argument is closely parallel with hand-to-hand combat. And all of today’s Asian martial arts—like Karate, Kung-Fu, Judo, or Aikido—were developed to embody and apply philosophical ideas. The Japanese martial tradition of Budo, for instance, was influenced by the three philosophical traditions of Shinto, Confucianism, and Zen Buddhism, and these philosophies are still taught in Japanese martial arts schools all across the world. As Damon Young explains in his chapter, the Japanese martial arts customs of courtesy are derived from Shinto purity, Confucian virtues, and the loving brutality of Zen. In his interview with Bodidharma (included in the book), Graham Priest brings out aspects of Buddhist philosophy behind Shaolin Kung-Fu—how fighting monks are seeking Buddhahood, not brawls. But as Scott Farrell’s chapter reveals, Eastern martial arts have no monopoly on philosophical traditions. Western chivalry is an education in and living revival of Aristotelian ethical theories. The Western martial art of fencing is explored by Nick Michaud, who looks at the morality of selfishness in fencing, and Christopher Lawrence and Jeremy Moss, who try to pin down what makes fencing unique: is it the sword, the techniques, the footwork, the aristocratic aura, or something else? Jack Fuller argues that his training in Karate was an education in Stoicism. Travis Taylor and Sasha Cooper reveal the utilitarian thinking behind Jigoro Kano’s Judo. Kevin Krein maintains that the martial arts are a reply to the existentialist’s anxiety about the meaninglessness of life. Patricia Peterson examines Karate’s contribution to feminism, and Scott Beattie analyzes the role of space in the martial arts school. Joe Lynch pits the Western ideas of Plato against the Eastern ideas of the Shaolin monks. Bronwyn Finnigan and Koji Tanaka uncover the meaning of human action as it appears in Kendo. Rick Schubert explains the meaning of mastery in the fighting arts. Moving to ethical issues, Tamara Kohn discovers what we owe to others in Aikido. Chris Mortensen questions whether his own Buddhist pacifism is compatible with being a martial artist. In different ways, Gillian Russell and John Haffner and Jason Vogel assess the ways in which martial arts can morally compromise us. How can the sweaty and the brutal be exquisitely beautiful? Judy Saltzman looks into the curious charm of fighting and forms, with help from Friedrich Nietzsche.

Black Belt for Life

A Memoir of Personal Development and the Martial Arts

Author: Rob Smith Ph.D.

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 185

View: 692

Rob Smiths candor about his lifes journey provides the reader with keen insights that one should apply to their own life. -Col. Arnold Scheller, M.D. This is an essential book for anyone who wants to pursue excellence in life. Grand Master Joseph Esposito, Kenpo Karate From an internationally known Sport Psychologist This is a memoir-style account of the determination, adaptability, faith, and humility it takes to earn a Black Belt in Kenpo style karate. Psychologist and First Degree Black Belt Rob Smith candidly shares his personal successes and failures, and how they eventually lead him to pursuing the martial arts and, ultimately, the Black Belt journey in his personal and professional life. In this book, Dr. Smith offers a rare look at what happens behind the scenes during an intense, 16-week Black Belt test, with unprecedented access to the training techniques, test requirements, and high standards set by his dynamic sensei, Grand Master Joseph Esposito.Black Belt For Life serves as a must-read manual for how to physically and mentally prepare for a life of continuous self-improvement. The book concludes with a summary of some key lessons Dr. Smith has learned so far in his Black Belt journey. The Foreword of this book is written by a man who has embodied the Black Belt path. Col. Arnold Scheller holds a Black Belt in Hapkido, served in the elite U.S. Army Rangers, and served as the team physician for the Boston Celtics from 1987-2005. Excellent . . . and thanks for writing this book Rob Jacob, author of Martial Arts Biographies: An Annotated Bibliography

Redrawing Anthropology

Materials, Movements, Lines

Author: Professor Tim Ingold

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 356

Why should anthropologists draw? The answer proposed in this groundbreaking volume is that drawing uniquely brings together ways of making, observing and describing. In twelve chapters, a team of authors from the UK, Europe, North America and Australia explore the potential of a graphic anthropology to change the way we think about creativity and perception, to grasp the dynamics of improvisatory practice, and to refocus the study of material culture from ready-made objects onto the flows of materials involved in the generation of things. Drawing on expertise in fields ranging from craftwork, martial arts, and dance to observational cinema and experimental film, they ask what it means to follow materials, to learn movements and to draw lines. Along the way, they contribute to key debates on what happens in making, the relation between design and performance, how people acquire bodily skills, the place of movement in human self-awareness, the relation between walking and imagination, and the perception of time. This book will appeal not just to social, cultural and visual anthropologists but to archaeologists and students of material culture, as well as to scholars across the arts, humanities and social sciences with interests in perception, creativity and material culture.

Esoteric Martial Arts of Zen: Training Methods from the Patriarch

Author: Edward Orem

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 70

View: 432

This book addresses how to explore, generate and control energies not usually available to humans. 190 photographs and step-by-step instruction in two of the most influential and powerful training systems ever handed down: Shipalohanshou/18 Methods of the Enlightened Ones and Yijinjing/Muscle-Sinew Changing. It offers integrated training for those who wish to do the work of improving cerebral functions, coming to full understanding of the human experience, and maintaining multi-level health. It is based on the training methods from ancient India and China, as experienced by the founder of Chan/Zen Buddhism, Bodhidharma (Tamo) as he grew into adulthood and spiritual maturity. The Patriarch of Zen was considered a dangerous rebel by the status quo, and for good reason: his approach to human development rejected authority outside of oneself, including scripture and officials. Officials/Intellectuals within the Buddhist hierarchy have always had a hard time with Tamo's methods of direct pointing.

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