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A Comprehensive Study of Tang Poetry II

Author: Lin Geng

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 188

View: 908

Tang poetry is one of the most valuable cultural inheritances of Chinese history. Its distinctive aesthetics, delicate language and diverse styles constitute great Literature in itself, as well as a rich topic for literary study. This two-volume set constitutes a classic analysis of Tang poetry in the “Golden Age” of Chinese poetry (618–907 CE). This volume focuses on the prominent Tang poets and poems. Beginning with an introduction to the “four greatest poets”—Li Bai, Du Fu, Wang Wei, and Bai Juyi—the author discusses their subjects, language, influence, and key works. The volume also includes essays on a dozen of masterpieces of Tang poetry, categorized by topics such as love and friendship, aspirations and seclusion, as well as travelling and nostalgia. As the author stresses, Tang poetry is worth rereading because it makes us invigorate our mental wellbeing, leaving it powerful and full of vitality. This book will appeal to researchers and students of Chinese literature, especially of classical Chinese poetry. People interested in Chinese culture will also benefit from the book.

The Masters and Themes of Tang Poetry

Genre and Enlightenment

Author: Geng Lin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 449

"Tang poetry is one of the most valuable cultural inheritances of Chinese history. Its distinctive aesthetics, delicate language and diverse styles constitute great Literature in itself, as well as a rich topic for literary study. This two-volume set constitutes a classic analysis of Tang poetry in the "Golden Age" of Chinese poetry (618-907 A.D). Volume 1 focuses on the prominent poets and poems of Tang poetry. Beginning with an introduction to the "four greatest poets" - Li Bai, Du Fu, Wang Wei and Bai Juyi - the author discusses their subjects, language, influence, and key works. It also includes essays on the masterpieces of Tang poetry, categorized by topics such as love and friendship, aspirations and seclusion, as well as travelling and nostalgia. As the author stresses, Tang poetry is worth rereading because it makes our invigorates our mental wellbeing, leaving it powerful and full of vitality. This book will appeal to researchers and students of Chinese literature, especially of classical Chinese poetry. People interested in Chinese culture will also benefit from the book"--

A Comprehensive Study of Tang Poetry

Author: Lin Geng

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 240

Tang poetry is one of the most valuable cultural inheritances of Chinese history. Its distinctive aesthetics, delicate language and diverse styles constitute great literature in itself, as well as a rich topic for literary study. This two-volume set is the masterpiece of Professor Lin Geng, one of China’s most respected literary historians, and reflects decades of active research into Tang poetry, covering the “Golden Age” of Chinese poetry (618–907 CE). In the first volume, the author provides a general understanding of poetry in the “High Tang” era from a range of perspectives. Starting with an indepth discussion of the Romantic tradition and historical context, the author focuses on poetic language patterns, Youth Spirit, maturity symbols, and prototypes of poetry. The author demonstrates that the most valuable part of Tang poetry is how it can provide people with a new perspective on every aspect of life. The second volume focuses on the prominent Tang poets and poems. Beginning with an introduction to the “four greatest poets”—Li Bai, Du Fu, Wang Wei, and Bai Juyi—the author discusses their subjects, language, influence, and key works. The volume also includes essays on a dozen masterpieces of Tang poetry, categorized by topics such as love and friendship, aspirationsand seclusion, as well as travelling and nostalgia. As the author stresses, Tang poetry is worth rereading because it makes us invigorate our mental wellbeing, leaving it powerful and full of vitality. This book will appeal to researchers and students of Chinese literature, especially of classical Chinese poetry. People interested in Chinese culture will also benefit from the book.

A Comprehensive Study of Tang Poetry I

Author: Lin Geng

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 150

View: 246

Tang poetry is one of the most valuable cultural inheritances of Chinese history. Its distinctive aesthetics, delicate language, and diverse styles constitute great literature in itself, as well as a rich topic for literary study. This two-volume set constitutes a classic analysis of Tang poetry in the “Golden Age” of Chinese poetry (618–907 CE). In this volume, the author provides a general understanding of poetry in the “High Tang” era from a range of perspectives. Starting with an indepth discussion of the Romantic tradition and historical context, the author focuses on poetic language patterns, Youth Spirit, maturity symbols, and prototypes of poetry. The author demonstrates that the most valuable part of Tang poetry is how it can provide people with a new perspective on every aspect of life. This book will appeal to researchers, scholars, and students of Chinese literature and especially of classical Chinese poetry. People interested in Chinese culture more widely will also benefit from this book.

A Comprehensive Study of Tang Poetry

Author: Taylor & Francis Group

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 919

Intertextuality in the English Translations of San Guo Yan Yi

Author: Wenqing Peng

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 202

View: 713

San Guo Yan Yi is one of the best-known classic Chinese novels in the English-speaking world. The earliest English translation came out in 1820, while a range of further translations have been produced over the past two hundred years. How do the different versions relate to each other? This volume examines the intertextual relations between the English translations of San Guo Yan Yi. Intertextuality refers to the interdependence of texts in relation to one another. Focusing on the perspectives of impact, quotation, parallels and transformation, the author compares a range of the translated versions, including two full-length translations and over twenty excerpted renderings and partial adaptations since the 1820s. She discovers that excerpted translations are selected to fit the translators’ own narrations, and are adapted to many genres, such as poetry, drama, fairytales, and textbooks. Moreover, the original text, translated texts and other related English works are interconnected in one large network, for which intertextuality offers an ideal basis for research. Students and scholars of Chinese literature and translation studies will benefit from this book.

Metaphysical and Mid-Late Tang Poetry: A Baroque Comparison

Author: Pengfei Wang

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 126

View: 944

Wishing to expand on the minimal scholarship on the topic of Metaphysical and Mid-Late Tang poets under the general category of Baroque, this book offers a comparative analysis of poems from the Metaphysical poets John Donne, Andrew Marvell and Richard Crashaw and a selection of Tang poetry by Meng Jiao, Li He and Li Shangyin. By following Nietzche’s definition of Baroque as a poetic “style” found in any period and country, and the concept of art as allegory, the author approaches the analysis of these poems using allegorical reading. The application of this non-traditional method of investigation and analysis has produced ground-breaking implications in the area of literary criticism, paving the way for future additions to the growing body of work on Baroque poetry. Therefore, it is likely to hold great appeal to literature researchers and scholars, as well as those studying Tang poetry, Metaphysical poetry and Comparative Studies.

A History of Western Appreciation of English-translated Tang Poetry

Author: Lan Jiang

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 265

View: 596

This book examines the development of English-translated Tang poetry and its propagation to the Western world. It consists of two parts, the first of which addresses the initial stage of English-translated Tang poetry’s propagation, and the second exploring its further development. By analyzing the historical background and characteristics of these two stages, the book traces the trend back to its roots, discusses some well-known early sinologists and their contributions, and familiarizes readers with the general course of Tang poetry’s development. In addition, it presents the translated versions of many Tang poems. The dissemination of Tang poetry to the Western world is a significant event in the history of cross-cultural communication. From the simple imitation of poetic techniques to the acceptance and identification of key poetic concepts, the Tang poetry translators gradually constructed a classic “Chinese style” in modern American poetry. Hence, the traditional Chinese culture represented by Tang poetry spread more widely in the English-speaking world, producing a more lasting impact on societies and cultures outside China – and demonstrating the poetry’s ability to transcend the boundaries of time, region, nationality and culture. Due to different cultural backgrounds, the Tang poets or poems admired most by Western readers may not necessarily receive high acclaim in China. Sometimes language barriers and cultural differences make it impossible to represent certain allusions or cultural and ethnic concepts correctly during the translation process. However, in recent decades, the translation of Tang poetry has evolved considerably in both quantity and quality. As culture is manifested in language, and language is part of culture, the translation of Tang poetry has allowed Western scholars to gain an unprecedented understanding of China and Chinese culture.

One Who Knows Me

Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China

Author: Anna Shields

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 568

The friendships of writers of the mid-Tang era (780s–820s)—between literary giants like Bai Juyi and Yuan Zhen, Han Yu and Meng Jiao, Liu Zongyuan and Liu Yuxi—became famous through the many texts they wrote to and about one another. What inspired mid-Tang literati to write about their friendships with such zeal? And how did these writings influence Tang literary culture more broadly? In One Who Knows Me, the first book to delve into friendship in medieval China, Anna M. Shields explores the literature of the mid-Tang to reveal the complex value its writers discovered in friendship—as a rewarding social practice, a rich literary topic, a way to negotiate literati identity, and a path toward self-understanding. Shields traces the evolution of the performance of friendship through a wide range of genres, including letters, prefaces, exchange poetry, and funerary texts, and interweaves elegant translations with close readings of these texts. For mid-Tang literati, writing about friendship became a powerful way to write about oneself and to reflect upon a shared culture. Their texts reveal the ways that friendship intersected the public and private realms of experience and, in the process, reshaped both.

The History and Spirit of Chinese Art (2-Volume Set)

Author: Lu Yilong

Publisher: Enrich Professional Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 200

View: 420

Art is always a product of cultural evolution, and The History and Spirit of Chinese Art looks at this universal process as it unfolded in ancient China. With “mountain-water” landscape paintings, works of classical Chinese calligraphy, and blue and white porcelain widely displayed in museums and fetching high prices in auction houses worldwide, Chinese art is no longer foreign to the Western world. However, to many, the making of such cultural artefacts remains an enigmatic process. Indeed, Chinese art, the product of such an old civilization, was shaped by an ongoing process of evolution along the ebbs and flows of China’s history as a nation. In The History and Spirit of Chinese Art, aesthetics expert Zhang Fa deciphers the philosophies and thoughts that have defined Chinese art since the very beginning of the Chinese civilization, moving through the dynastic landmarks of artistic development with discussions of numerous art forms including paintings, architecture, dance and music, calligraphy, and literature.

The Great Age of Chinese Poetry

The High Tang

Author: Stephen Owen

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 652

View: 421

Hailed as the most important and most comprehensive single study of Tang poetry to have appeared in English when originally published by Yale University Press in 1981, this Quirin Press Revised Edition brings back into print this much sought after title and offers the full original text with the following features: Older Wade-Giles transliteration fully updated and revised to the current Pinyin standard; Fully re-typeset and proofed for typographical errors and inconsistencies. New expanded index including Chinese characters; Also available in a fully searchable E-book format including Chinese unicode characters ISBN: 978-1-922169-07-5 (pdf) Following Owen's analysis in "The Poetry of Early Tang" (also available from Quirin Press) of poetry as an art of social gesture and occasion this title explores the poetry of the High Tang which has often been referred to as "apogee of all Chinese poetry." Rather than merely defining the poetic art of eighth century China through Wang Wei, Li Bai, and Du Fu, Owen delves into the norms of the age to become acquainted with the symbiotic relationship that existed both between the major and lesser talents of the age, and the overall literary tradition. In these pages the poetry of the High Tang comes to life as a self-conscious art form, which, combined with a rekindling of China's poetic past, lead to a more personal mode of expression and individual voice that culminated in the unprecedented and dazzling efflorescence of the art. Extracts available on www.quirinpress.com Keywords: Chinese Poetry - Tang Dynasty 618-907 - Poetics - History & Criticism. Owen's companion volume on the Early Tang is also available from Quirin Press ISBN: 978-1-922169-02-0 (paperback) ISBN: 978-1-922169-03-7 (pdf). For further information and extracts visit www.quirinpress.com

The Ming Prince and Daoism

Institutional Patronage of an Elite

Author: Richard G. Wang

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 372

Scholars of Daoism in the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) have paid particular attention to the interaction between the court and certain Daoist priests and to the political results of such interaction; the focus has been on either emperors or Daoist masters. Yet in the Ming era, a special group of people patronized Daoism and Daoist establishments: these were the members of the imperial clan, who were enfeoffed as princes. By illuminating the role the Ming princes played in local religion, Richard G. Wang demonstrates in The Ming Prince and Daoism that the princedom served to mediate between official religious policy and the commoners' interests. In addition to personal belief and self-cultivation, a prince had other reasons to patronize Daoism. As the regional overlords, the Ming princes, like other local elites, saw financing and organizing temple affairs and rituals, patronizing Daoist priests, or collecting and producing Daoist books as a chance to maintain their influence and show off their power. The prosperity of Daoist institutions, which attracted many worshippers, also demonstrated the princes' political success. Locally, the Ming princes played an important cultural role as well by promoting the development of local religions. This book is the first to explore the interaction between Ming princes as religious patrons and local Daoism. Barred by imperial law from any serious political or military engagement, the Ming princes were ex officio managers of state rituals at the local level, with Daoist priests as key performers. Moreover, institutionally, most regular ceremonies related to a prince's life were mandated to be conducted by Daoist musician-dancers, and that as a result the princely courtly rites were characterized by a Daoist flavor. For this reason the princes became very closely involved in Daoist clerical and liturgical life.

Critical Readings on Tang China

Author: Paul W. Kroll

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 546

View: 296

The Tang dynasty, lasting from 618 to 907, was the high point of medieval Chinese history, featuring unprecedented achievements in governmental organization, economic and territorial expansion, literature, the arts, and religion. Many Tang practices continued, with various developments, to influence Chinese society for the next thousand years. For these and other reasons the Tang has been a key focus of Western sinologists. This volume presents English-language reprints of fifty-seven critical studies of the Tang, in the three general categories of political history, literature and cultural history, and religion. The articles and book chapters included here are important scholarly benchmarks that will serve as the starting-point for anyone interested in the study of medieval China.

Black Tigers

A Grammar of Chinese Rubbings

Author: Kenneth Starr

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 320

View: 668

Since at least the seventh century C.E., Chinese ink rubbings of stone, metal, and wood inscriptions and pictorial images have been created to serve as precise copies of valuable material. These paper copies sometimes are all that remain of the original works. Despite the primary importance of this technology to history, art, archaeology, and many other fields, this is the first comprehensive study of rubbings in a Western language. Kenneth Starr is the former director of the Milwaukee Public Museum and former curator of Asiatic Archaeology at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.

Transgressive Typologies

Constructions of Gender and Power in Early Tang China

Author: Doran Doran

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 464

The exceptionally powerful Chinese women leaders of the late seventh and early eighth centuries—including Wu Zhao, the Taiping and Anle princesses, Empress Wei, and Shangguan Wan’er—though quite prominent in the Chinese cultural tradition, remain elusive and often misunderstood or essentialized throughout history. Transgressive Typologies utilizes a new, multidisciplinary approach to understand how these figures’ historical identities are constructed in the mainstream secular literary-historical tradition and to analyze the points of view that inform these constructions. Using close readings and rereadings of primary texts written in medieval China through later imperial times, this study elucidates narrative typologies and motifs associated with these women to explore how their power is rhetorically framed, gendered, and ultimately deemed transgressive. Rebecca Doran offers a new understanding of major female figures of the Tang era within their literary-historical contexts, and delves into critical questions about the relationship between Chinese historiography, reception-history, and the process of image-making and cultural construction.

The Road to East Slope

The Development of Su Shi's Poetic Voice

Author: Michael Anthony Fuller

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 383

View: 550

Su Shi (1037-1101) is the greatest poet of the Song Dynasty, a man whose writings and image defined some of the enduring central themes of the Chinese cultural tradition. Su Shi was not only the best poet of his time, he was also a government official, a major prose stylist, a noted calligrapher, an avid herbalist, a dabbler in alchemy, and a broadly learned scholar. The author shows how this complex personality was embodied in Su Shi's work and traces the evolution of his poems from juvenilia to the poems written in exile in Huangzhou, where Su settled on a farm at East Slope.

Women and Confucian Cultures in Premodern China, Korea, and Japan

Author: Dorothy Ko

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 914

This book rewrites the history of East Asia by rethinking the contentious relationship between "Confucianisms" and "women."

Gender, Power, and Talent

The Journey of Daoist Priestesses in Tang China

Author: Jinhua Jia

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 324

View: 624

During the Tang dynasty (618–907), changes in political policies, the religious landscape, and gender relations opened the possibility for Daoist women to play an unprecedented role in religious and public life. Women, from imperial princesses to the daughters of commoner families, could be ordained as Daoist priestesses and become religious leaders, teachers, and practitioners in their own right. Some achieved remarkable accomplishments: one wrote and transmitted texts on meditation and inner cultivation; another, a physician, authored a treatise on therapeutic methods, medical theory, and longevity techniques. Priestess-poets composed major works, and talented priestess-artists produced stunning calligraphy. In Gender, Power, and Talent, Jinhua Jia draws on a wealth of previously untapped sources to explain how Daoist priestesses distinguished themselves as a distinct gendered religious and social group. She describes the life journey of priestesses from palace women to abbesses and ordinary practitioners, touching on their varied reasons for entering the Daoist orders, the role of social and religious institutions, forms of spiritual experience, and the relationships between gendered identities and cultural representations. Jia takes the reader inside convents and cloisters, demonstrating how they functioned both as a female space for self-determination and as a public platform for both religious and social spheres. The first comprehensive study of the lives and roles of Daoist priestesses in Tang China, Gender, Power, and Talent restores women to the landscape of Chinese religion and literature and proposes new methodologies for the growing field of gender and religion.

Prosperity in Sui and Tang Dynasties

Author: Da Xue

Publisher: DeepLogic

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 506

The book is the volume of “Prosperity in Sui and Tang Dynasties” among a series of books of “Chinese Dynastic History”. The earliest known written records of the history of China date from as early as 1250 BC, from the Shang dynasty (c. 1600–1046 BC) and the Bamboo Annals (296 BC) describe a Xia dynasty (c. 2070–1600 BC) before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period The Shang ruled in the Yellow River valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River and Yangtze River. These Yellow River and Yangtze civilizations arose millennia before the Shang. With thousands of years of continuous history, China is one of the world's oldest civilizations, and is regarded as one of the cradles of civilization. The Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) supplanted the Shang and introduced the concept of the Mandate of Heaven to justify their rule. The central Zhou government began to weaken due to external and internal pressures in the 8th century BC, and the country eventually splintered into smaller states during the Spring and Autumn period. These states became independent and warred with one another in the following Warring States period. Much of traditional Chinese culture, literature and philosophy first developed during those troubled times. In 221 BC Qin Shi Huang conquered the various warring states and created for himself the title of Huangdi or "emperor" of the Qin, marking the beginning of imperial China. However, the oppressive government fell soon after his death, and was supplanted by the longer-lived Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD). Successive dynasties developed bureaucratic systems that enabled the emperor to control vast territories directly. In the 21 centuries from 206 BC until AD 1912, routine administrative tasks were handled by a special elite of scholar-officials. Young men, well-versed in calligraphy, history, literature, and philosophy, were carefully selected through difficult government examinations. China's last dynasty was the Qing (1644–1912), which was replaced by the Republic of China in 1912, and in the mainland by the People's Republic of China in 1949. Chinese history has alternated between periods of political unity and peace, and periods of war and failed statehood – the most recent being the Chinese Civil War (1927–1949). China was occasionally dominated by steppe peoples, most of whom were eventually assimilated into the Han Chinese culture and population. Between eras of multiple kingdoms and warlordism, Chinese dynasties have ruled parts or all of China; in some eras control stretched as far as Xinjiang and Tibet, as at present. Traditional culture, and influences from other parts of Asia and the Western world (carried by waves of immigration, cultural assimilation, expansion, and foreign contact), form the basis of the modern culture of China.

Five Hundred Years of Chinese Poetry, 1150-1650

The Chin, Yuan, and Ming Dynasties

Author: Kojiro Yoshikawa

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 236

View: 280

Five Hundred Years of Chinese Poetry offers the only historical survey, in any language, of this important span of Chinese poetry. Written by the foremost Japanese sinologist of this century, and translated here in a lucid analogue to his famous prose style, the work provides a brief but comprehensive review of the period's literary history, a sketch of its political and social history in relation to literature, and a rendering of more than one hundred and fifty poems. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.