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A Devil's Chaplain

Reflections on Hope, Lies, Science, and Love

Author: Richard Dawkins

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 263

View: 134

Presents a collection of essays that explore such topics as religion, mysticism, moden educational methods, pseudoscience, Africa, and late colleagues Douglas Adams and Stephen Jay Gould.

The Devil's Chaplain

Author: Bruce Hartman

Publisher: Swallow Tail Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 290

View: 666

Disillusioned with her corporate legal career, attorney Charlotte Ambler volunteers to handle the final appeal of Christopher Ritter, a Florida death row inmate whose execution is imminent. Ritter had been a prominent biologist before being convicted ten years earlier for the brutal murder of a prostitute. He denies killing the woman but is tormented by guilt for other, secret transgressions. The only appeal he will allow is to prove that he is innocent-a kind of appeal which is almost impossible to succeed.As Ritter relates his sordid life story, Charlotte discovers that innocence is more complicated than she thought. Ritter claims to have been framed by a shadowy figure named Craft, but as Charlotte studies the evidence she concludes that he is a dangerous psychopath who should not go free. Then a piece of evidence turns up that confirms a key part of his story. Pursuing her investigation, she is thwarted by hidden forces that seem determined to see him executed. In a race against the clock, she searches for the elusive Craft and fights to save Ritter in spite of himself. THE DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN is a legal thriller in the tradition of Scott Turow and John Grisham -- a gripping tale of deception and self-deception, betrayal and violence, in which lawyer and client find common ground in their quest for justice and human values.

The Devil's Chaplain

Author: George Bronson-Howard

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 313

View: 833

Creation Made Free

Open Theology Engaging Science

Author: Thomas Jay Oord

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 533

Open Theology offers an advantageous framework for engaging the sciences. With its emphasis upon creaturely freedom, relationality, realist epistemology, and love, Open Theology makes a fruitful dialogue partner with leading fields and theories in contemporary science. In Creation Made Free, leading proponents of open theism explore natural and social scientific dimensions of reality as these dimensions both inform and are informed by Open Theology. Important themes addressed include evolution, creation ex nihilo, emergence theory, biblical cosmology, cognitive linguistics, quantum theory, and forgiveness.

Oracles of Science

Celebrity Scientists Versus God and Religion

Author: Karl Giberson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 273

View: 809

The authors offer an informed analysis on the views of Stephen Jay Gould, Richard Dawkins, Edward O. Wilson, Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking and Steven Weinberg; carefully distinguishing science from philosophy and religion in the writings of the oracles.

Evolution in the Antipodes

Charles Darwin and Australia (Large Print 16pt)

Author: Tom Frame

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 524

View: 257

Charles Darwin's profound influence on Australian thinking is explored from a variety of positions in this carefully researched analysis. Providing useful contextual material on Darwin's life and times, including his 1836 visit to Australia in the HMS Beagle, the narrative examines historic disputes and contemporary debates about Darwin's motivations and methods. This reference also displays his scientific conclusions and their social consequences while outlining the various ways in which Darwin's work continues to shape Australian public policy and private behavior.

Eyewitness to Science

Author: John Carey

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 528

View: 584

Using essays, arguments and investigations by scientists such as Darwin, Huxley and Fabre, this text plots the development of modern science from Leonardo da Vinci to the chaos theory. It explores areas as diverse as da Vinci's observations of nocturnal birds to Asimov's explication of black holes.

Science and Religion in Neo-Victorian Novels

Eye of the Ichthyosaur

Author: John Glendening

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 130

Criticism about the neo-Victorian novel — a genre of historical fiction that re-imagines aspects of the Victorian world from present-day perspectives — has expanded rapidly in the last fifteen years but given little attention to the engagement between science and religion. Of great interest to Victorians, this subject often appears in neo-Victorian novels including those by such well-known authors as John Fowles, A. S. Byatt, Graham Swift, and Mathew Kneale. This book discusses novels in which nineteenth-century science, including geology, paleontology, and evolutionary theory, interacts with religion through accommodations, conflicts, and crises of faith. In general, these texts abandon conventional religion but retain the ethical connectedness and celebration of life associated with spirituality at its best. Registering the growth of nineteenth-century secularism and drawing on aspects of the romantic tradition and ecological thinking, they honor the natural world without imagining that it exists for humans or functions in reference to human values. In particular, they enact a form of wonderment: the capacity of the mind to make sense of, creatively adapt, and enjoy the world out of which it has evolved — in short, to endow it with meaning. Protagonists who come to experience reality in this expansive way release themselves from self-anxiety and alienation. In this book, Glendening shows how, by intermixing past and present, fact and fiction, neo-Victorian narratives, with a few instructive exceptions, manifest this pattern.

The Selfish Gene

30th Anniversary edition

Author: Richard Dawkins

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 787

The million copy international bestseller, critically acclaimed and translated into over 25 languages. This 30th anniversary edition includes a new introduction from the author as well as the original prefaces and foreword, and extracts from early reviews. As relevant and influential today as when it was first published, The Selfish Gene has become a classic exposition of evolutionary thought. Professor Dawkins articulates a gene's eye view of evolution - a view giving centre stage to these persistent units of information, and in which organisms can be seen as vehicles for their replication. This imaginative, powerful, and stylistically brilliant work not only brought the insights of Neo-Darwinism to a wide audience, but galvanized the biology community, generating much debate and stimulating whole new areas of research.

Darwin the Writer

Author: George Levine

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 660

Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, arguably the most important book written in English in the nineteenth century, transformed the way we looked at the world. It is usually assumed that this is because the idea of evolution was so staggeringly powerful. Prize-winning author George Levine suggests that much of its influence was due, in fact, to its artistry; to the way it was written. Alive with metaphor, vivid descriptions, twists, hesitations, personal exclamations, and humour, the prose is imbued with the sorts of tensions, ambivalences, and feelings characteristic of great literature. Although it is certainly a work of "science," the Origin is equally a work of "literature," at home in the company of celebrated Victorian novels such as Middlemarch and Bleak House, books that give us a unique yet recognisable sense of what the world is really like, while not being literally 'true'. Darwin's enormous cultural success, Levine contends, depended as much on the construction of his argument and the nature of his language, as it did on the power of his ideas and his evidence. By challenging the dominant reading of his work, this impassioned and energetic book gives us a Darwin who is comic rather than tragic, ebullient rather than austere, and who takes delight in the wild and fluid entanglement of things.

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