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Death and Memory in Medieval Exeter

Author: David Lepine

Publisher: Devon and Cornwall Record Soci

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 282

Death, burial, and the commemoration of the dead have been much studied by historians in recent years, but far less has been done to make available the sources on which these studies are based. This book sets out to fill the gap with an anthology of the rich and varied evidence that survives from the medieval city of Exeter.It begins with a history of burial practices in the city: where people were buried and why. This is followed by an edition of the only remaining local burial list, relating to the hospital of St John, and by a register of all the 650 people known to have had a funeral or burial in Exeter between 1050 and 1540 with details of dates and places.The second part of the book deals with wills and executors. It prints the eighteen earliest Exeter wills (1244-1349), and two rare documents drawn up by executors: the inventory of a prosperous widow's possessions (1324) and the impressive, hitherto unedited, executors' accounts of Andrew Kilkenny, dean of Exeter (1302-15). A list of all the surviving Exeter wills up to 1540 (over 700 complete or in part) is also provided.The final section centres on how the dead were remembered. This contains over a dozen obituary records naming men and women and the dates of their deaths, ranging from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries. The records include some remarkably early lists of members of guilds in the neighbourhood of Exeter, dating from about the year 1100; the obituary list of the Exeter guild of Kalendars in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries; the oldest specimens of the cathedral's 'obit accounts' from 1305-7; a document establishing a chantry in 1305; and several 'obit calendars' from Exeter Cathedral.Altogether the volume contains 2 registers of names and 36 documents, nearly all of which are making their first appearance in print. All the documents have been translated into modern English, and they are eminently suitable for use by undergraduates and postgraduates as well as for academic research. There are full introductions to each of the three sections, three maps, eight pages of photographs, a glossary, bibliography, and index.

Archaeologies of Remembrance

Death and Memory in Past Societies

Author: Howard Williams

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 754

How did past communities and individuals remember through social and ritual practices? How important were mortuary practices in processes of remembering and forgetting the past? This innovative new research work focuses upon identifying strategies of remembrance. Evidence can be found in a range of archaeological remains including the adornment and alteration of the body in life and death, the production, exchange, consumption and destruction of material culture, the construction, use and reuse of monuments, and the social ordering of architectural space and the landscape. This book shows how in the past, as today, shared memories are important and defining aspects of social and ritual traditions, and the practical actions of dealing with and disposing of the dead can form a central focus for the definition of social memory.

Death and Memory

Soane and the Architecture of Legacy

Author: Helen Dorey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 48

View: 916

This book of essays is published to coincide with an exhibition of the same title at Sir John Soane's Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London (October 23, 2015 March 26, 2016) commemorating the 200th anniversary of Soane's beloved wife Eliza's death on November 22, 1815. Its relevance to Soane studies, is, however, much broader, with essays shedding new light on the architecture of legacy in Sir John Soane's Museum; Soane's preoccupation with memorialization as revealed in the design process for the Soane family tomb; the legacy of his drawings collection; and Soane's attempt shortly before his death to sustain future interest in his collections by creating a series of time capsules. The essays, written by the curatorial team at Sir John Soane's Museum, are accompanied by 39 illustrations in full color, some of them published for the first time."

The Death of Memory

Author: Glenn Sevilla Mas

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 172

View: 241

Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain

Author: Howard Williams

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 474

How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400–1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices. He argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared 'social' memories intended to link past, present and future. Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.

Night of Stone

Death and Memory in Twentieth-century Russia

Author: Catherine Merridale

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 746

Russia's dark history and its modern-day legacy are the focus of this unique look at the troubled country, which confronts the nation's troubled past and examines the shadow cast by these events on the twentieth century. Reprint.

Death and Memory

A Study of the Funerary Landscapes of the Eastern Carpathian Basin from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age

Author: Tibor-Tamás Daróczi

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 335

View: 329

Death, Memory and Material Culture

Author: Elizabeth Hallam

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 863

- How do the living maintain ongoing relationships with the dead in Western societies? - How have the residual belongings of the dead been used to evoke memories? - Why has the body and its material environment remained so important in memory-making? Objects, images, practices, and places remind us of the deaths of others and of our own mortality. At the time of death, embodied persons disappear from view, their relationships with others come under threat and their influence may cease. Emotionally, socially, politically, much is at stake at the time of death. In this context, memories and memory-making can be highly charged, and often provide the dead with a social presence amongst the living. Memories of the dead are a bulwark against the terror of forgetting, as well as an inescapable outcome of a life's ending. Objects in attics, gardens, museums, streets and cemeteries can tell us much about the processes of remembering. This unusual and absorbing book develops perspectives in anthropology and cultural history to reveal the importance of material objects in experiences of grief, mourning and memorializing. Far from being ‘invisible', the authors show how past generations, dead friends and lovers remain manifest - through well-worn garments, letters, photographs, flowers, residual drops of perfume, funerary sculpture. Tracing the rituals, gestures and materials that have been used to shape and preserve memories of personal loss, Hallam and Hockey show how material culture provides the deceased with a powerful presence within the here and now.

Memory and Mourning

Studies on Roman Death

Author: Valerie M. Hope

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 870

Death is a life crisis; a time of change and transformation, for the dead and the bereaved. Thus how dying, death and death rituals are used, described, presented and interpreted is fundamental to any society. This volume includes ten chapters, from expert contributors, which explore funerary rituals and commemoration in the Roman world, focusing upon the themes of memory and mourning. How were the memories of the dead constructed and contested; what role did funerals, oratory-and history, writing play in the names of the dead; how Were the dead mourned and commemorated? This volume challenges boundaries between traditional academic disciplines and utilizes current approaches in Scholarship. It-highlights how death was interwoven with Roman life and brings together diverse evidence such is poetry, oratory, portraiture, epigraphy, and funerary monuments. These chapters individually and collectively demonstrate the significance of studying the evidence for Roman death and death rituals, and how concerns for memory and mourning both shaped and were reflected in that evidence.

Perpetua's Passion

The Death and Memory of a Young Roman Woman

Author: Joyce E. Salisbury

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 342

Perpetua's Passion studies the third-century martyrdom of a young woman and places it in the intellectual and social context of her age. Conflicting ideas of religion, family and gender are explored as Salisbury follows Perpetua from her youth in a wealthy Roman household to her imprisonment and death in the arena.

The Thought of Death and the Memory of War

Author: Marc Crépon

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 184

View: 295

War lays bare death and our relation to it. And in the wars—or more precisely the memories of war—of the twentieth century, images of the deaths of countless faceless or nameless others eclipse the singularity of each victim’s death as well as the end of the world as such that each death signifies. Marc Crépon’s The Thought of Death and the Memory of War is a call to resist such images in which death is no longer actual death since it happens to anonymous others, and to seek instead a world in which mourning the other whose mortality we always already share points us toward a cosmopolitics. Crépon pursues this path toward a cosmopolitics of mourning through readings of works by Freud, Heidegger, Sartre, Patocka, Levinas, Derrida, and Ricœur, and others. The movement among these writers, Crépon shows, marks a way through—and against—twentieth-century interpretation to argue that no war, genocide, or neglect of people is possible without suspending how one relates to the death of another human being. A history of a critical strain in contemporary thought, this book is, as Rodolphe Gasché says in the Foreword, “a profound meditation on what constitutes evil and a rigorous and illuminating reflection on death, community, and world.” The translation of this work received financial support from the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Death, Dismemberment, and Memory

Body Politics in Latin America

Author: Lyman L. Johnson

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 294

The long history of the politically symbolic use of the bodies, or body parts, of martyred heroes in Latin America.

Death So Noble

Memory, Meaning, and the First World War

Author: Jonathan F. Vance

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 950

This book examines Canada's collective memory of the First World War through the 1920s and 1930s. It is a cultural history, considering art, music, and literature. Thematically organized into such subjects as the symbolism of the soldier, the implications of war memory for Canadian nationalism, and the idea of a just war, the book draws on military records, memoirs, war memorials, newspaper reports, fiction, popular songs, and films. It takes an unorthodox view of the Canadian war experience as a cultural and philosophical force rather than as a political and military event.

Struggle, Death, Memory, 1939-1945

On the Twentieth Anniversary of the Rising in the Warsaw Ghetto, 1943-1963

Author: Rada Ochrony Pomników Walki i Męczeństwa (Poland)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Jews

Page:

View: 878

Album of photographs taken in Warsaw and other parts of Poland.

The Dead Memory Machine

Tadeusz Kantor's Theatre of Death

Author: Krzysztof Pleśniarowicz

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Experimental theater

Page: 311

View: 517

Death and security

Memory and mortality at the bombsite

Author: Charlotte Heath-Kelly

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 213

Making a bold intervention into critical security studies literature, this book explores the ontological relationship between mortality and security. It considers the mortality theories of Heidegger and Bauman alongside literature from the sociology of death, before undertaking a comparative exploration of the memorialisation of four prominent post-terrorist sites: the World Trade Centre in New York, the Bali bombsite, the London bombings and the Norwegian sites attacked by Anders Breivik. By interviewing the architects and designers of these reconstruction projects, the book shows that practices of memorialisation are a retrospective security endeavour - they conceal and re-narrate the traumatic incursion of death. Disaster recovery is replete with security practices that return mortality to its sublimated position and remove the disruption posed by mortality to political authority. The book will be of significant interest to academics and postgraduates working in the fields of critical security studies, memory studies and international politics.

Genocide and the Politics of Memory

Studying Death to Preserve Life

Author: Herbert Hirsch

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 637

More than sixty million people have been victims of genocide in the twentieth century alone, including recent casualties in Bosnia and Rwanda. Herbert Hirsch studies repetitions of large-scale human violence in order to ascertain why people in every histo

Memory in Death

Author: J. D. Robb

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 446

#1 New York Times bestselling author J. D. Robb presents a memorable tale of suspense set in 2059 New York City, as Lieutenant Eve Dallas walks a tightrope between her professional duties and her private demons. Eve Dallas is one tough cop. It should take more than a seemingly ordinary middle-aged lady to make her fall apart. But when that lady is Trudy Lombard, all bets are off. Just seeing Trudy at the station plunges Eve back to the days when she was a vulnerable, traumatized young girl—and trapped in foster care with the twisted woman who now sits smiling in front of her. Trudy claims she came all the way to New York just to see how Eve is doing. But Eve’s fiercely protective husband, Roarke, suspects otherwise—and a blackmail attempt by Trudy proves his suspicion correct. Eve and Roarke just want the woman out of their lives. But someone else wants her dead. And when her murder comes to pass, Eve and Roarke will follow a circuitous and dangerous path to find out who turned the victimizer into a victim.

Death, Image, Memory

The Genocide in Rwanda and its Aftermath in Photography and Documentary Film

Author: Piotr Cieplak

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 230

View: 337

This book explores how photography and documentary film have participated in the representation of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and its aftermath. This in-depth analysis of professional and amateur photography and the work of Rwandan and international filmmakers offers an insight into not only the unique ability of images to engage with death, memory and the need for evidence, but also their helplessness and inadequacy when confronted with the enormity of the event. Focusing on a range of films and photographs, the book tests notions of truth, evidence, record and witnessing – so often associated with documentary practice – in the specific context of Rwanda and the wider representational framework of African conflict and suffering. Death, Image, Memory is an inquiry into the multiple memorial and evidentiary functions of images that transcends the usual investigations into whether photography and documentary film can reliably attest to the occurrence and truth of an event.

Struggle, Death, Memory, 1939-1945

On the Twentieth Anniversary of the Rising in the Warsaw Ghetto, 1943-1963

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Documentary photography

Page: 200

View: 888

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