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Empire and Popular Culture

Volume II

Author: Taylor & Francis Group

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 378

View: 611

From 1830, the Empire began to permeate the domestic culture of Empire nations in many ways. This volume considers the ways in which 'Empire' permeated the British public sphere, exploring exhibitions, spectacle and entertainment.

British Culture and the End of Empire

Author: Andrew Thompson

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 786

The demise of the British Empire in the three decades following the Second World War is a theme that has been well traversed in studies of post-war British politics, economics and foreign relations. Yet there has been strikingly little attention to the question of how these dramatic changes in Britain's relationships with the wider world were reflected in British culture. This volume addresses this central issue, arguing that the social and cultural impact of decolonisation had as significant an effect on the imperial centre as on the colonial periphery. Far from being a matter of indifference or resigned acceptance as is often suggested, the fall of the British Empire came as a profound shock to the British national imagination, and resonated widely in British popular culture.

Empire and Black Images in Popular Culture

Author: Joshua K. Wright

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 260

FOX’s musical drama Empire has been hailed as the savior of broadcast television, drawing 15 million viewers a week. A “hip-hopera” inspired by Shakespeare’s King Lear and 1980s prime-time soap Dynasty, the series is at the forefront of a black popular culture Renaissance—yet has stirred controversy in the black community. Is Empire shifting paradigms or promoting pernicious stereotypes? Examining the evolution and potency of black images in popular culture, the author explores Empire’s place in a diverse body of literature and media, data and discussions on respectability.

Masters of Doom

How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture

Author: David Kushner

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 163

Masters of Doom is the amazing true story of the Lennon and McCartney of video games: John Carmack and John Romero. Together, they ruled big business. They transformed popular culture. And they provoked a national controversy. More than anything, they lived a unique and rollicking American Dream, escaping the broken homes of their youth to co-create the most notoriously successful game franchises in history—Doom and Quake—until the games they made tore them apart. Americans spend more money on video games than on movie tickets. Masters of Doom is the first book to chronicle this industry’s greatest story, written by one of the medium’s leading observers. David Kushner takes readers inside the rags-to-riches adventure of two rebellious entrepreneurs who came of age to shape a generation. The vivid portrait reveals why their games are so violent and why their immersion in their brilliantly designed fantasy worlds offered them solace. And it shows how they channeled their fury and imagination into products that are a formative influence on our culture, from MTV to the Internet to Columbine. This is a story of friendship and betrayal, commerce and artistry—a powerful and compassionate account of what it’s like to be young, driven, and wildly creative. “To my taste, the greatest American myth of cosmogenesis features the maladjusted, antisocial, genius teenage boy who, in the insular laboratory of his own bedroom, invents the universe from scratch. Masters of Doom is a particularly inspired rendition. Dave Kushner chronicles the saga of video game virtuosi Carmack and Romero with terrific brio. This is a page-turning, mythopoeic cyber-soap opera about two glamorous geek geniuses—and it should be read while scarfing down pepperoni pizza and swilling Diet Coke, with Queens of the Stone Age cranked up all the way.”—Mark Leyner, author of I Smell Esther Williams

Popular Postcolonialisms

Discourses of Empire and Popular Culture

Author: Taylor & Francis Group

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 276

View: 616

Drawing together the insights of postcolonial scholarship and cultural studies, Popular Postcolonialisms questions the place of 'the popular' in the postcolonial paradigm. Multidisciplinary in focus, this collection explores the extent to which popular forms are infused with colonial logics, and whether they can be employed by those advocating for change. It considers a range of fiction, film, and non-hegemonic cultural forms, engaging with topics such as environmental change, language activism, and cultural imperialism alongside analysis of figures like Tarzan and Frankenstein. Building on the work of cultural theorists, it asks whether the popular is actually where elite conceptions of the world may best be challenged. It also addresses middlebrow cultural production, which has tended to be seen as antithetical to radical traditions, asking whether this might, in fact, form an unlikely realm from which to question, critique, or challenge colonial tropes. Examining the ways in which the imprint of colonial history is in evidence (interrogated, mythologized or sublimated) within popular cultural production, this book raises a series of speculative questions exploring the interrelation of the popular and the postcolonial.

Imperial Projections

Ancient Rome in Modern Popular Culture

Author: Sandra R. Joshel

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 299

View: 909

The creators of popular culture have often appropriated elements of Roman history and society. This text looks at how ancient Rome has been depicted and what the portrayals tell us about contemporary culture.

Empire, Politics and Popular Culture

Essays in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Popular Culture

Author: C. C. Eldridge

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Popular culture

Page: 143

View: 324

Empire and Popular Culture

Volume I

Author: John Griffiths

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 498

View: 332

From 1830, if not before, the Empire began to permeate the domestic culture of Empire nations in many ways. From consumables, to the excitement of colonial wars, celebrations relating to events in the history of Empire, and the construction of Empire Day in the early Edwardian period, most citizens were encouraged to think of themselves not only as citizens of a nation but of an Empire. Much of the popular culture of the period presented Empire as a force for ‘civilisation’ but it was often far from the truth and rather, Empire was a repressive mechanism designed ultimately to benefit white settlers and the metropolitan economy. This four volume collection on Empire and Popular Culture contains a wide array of primary sources, complemented by editorial narratives which help the reader to understand the significance of the documents contained therein. It is informed by the recent advocacy of a ‘three-nation’ approach to Empire containing documents which view Empire from the perspective of England, Scotland and Wales and will also contain material produced for Empire audiences, as well as indigenous perspectives. The sources reveal both the celebratory and the notorious sides of Empire. These volumes focus on institutions and popular culture such as clubs, societies, missions, churches, educational institutions and the ways in which people were depicted in popular culture – from heroic explorers to the fascination with and racism towards, indigenous peoples across the long nineteenth century.

The American Imperial Gothic

Popular Culture, Empire, Violence

Author: Johan Hoglund

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 938

The imagination of the early twenty-first century is catastrophic, with Hollywood blockbusters, novels, computer games, popular music, art and even political speeches all depicting a world consumed by vampires, zombies, meteors, aliens from outer space, disease, crazed terrorists and mad scientists. These frequently gothic descriptions of the apocalypse not only commodify fear itself; they articulate and even help produce imperialism. Building on, and often retelling, the British ’imperial gothic’ of the late nineteenth century, the American imperial gothic is obsessed with race, gender, degeneration and invasion, with the destruction of society, the collapse of modernity and the disintegration of capitalism. Drawing on a rich array of texts from a long history of the gothic, this book contends that the doom faced by the world in popular culture is related to the current global instability, renegotiation of worldwide power and the American bid for hegemony that goes back to the beginning of the Republic and which have given shape to the first decade of the millennium. From the frontier gothic of Charles Brockden Brown's Edgar Huntly to the apocalyptic torture porn of Eli Roth's Hostel, the American imperial gothic dramatises the desires and anxieties of empire. Revealing the ways in which images of destruction and social upheaval both query the violence with which the US has asserted itself locally and globally, and feed the longing for stable imperial structures, this book will be of interest to scholars and students of popular culture, cultural and media studies, literary and visual studies and sociology.

Visions of Empire

Patriotism, popular culture and the city, 1870-1939

Author: Brad Beaven

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 964

The emergence of a vibrant imperial culture in British society from the 1890s both fascinated and appalled contemporaries. It has also consistently provoked controversy among historians.This book offers a ground-breaking perspective on how imperial culture was disseminated. It identifies the important synergies that grew between a new civic culture and the wider imperial project.Beaven shows that the ebb and flow of imperial enthusiasm was shaped through a fusion of local patriotism and a broader imperial identity. Imperial culture was neither generic nor unimportant but was instead multi-layered and recast to capture the concerns of a locality. The book draws on a rich seam of primary sources from three representative English cities. These case studies are considered against an extensive analysis of seminal and current historiography. This renders the book invaluable to those interested in the fields of imperialism, social and cultural history, popular culture, historical geography and urban history.

Pop Empires

Transnational and Diasporic Flows of India and Korea

Author: S. Heijin Lee

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 639

At the start of the twenty-first century challenges to the global hegemony of U.S. culture are more apparent than ever. Two of the contenders vying for the hearts, minds, bandwidths, and pocketbooks of the world’s consumers of culture (principally, popular culture) are India and South Korea. “Bollywood” and “Hallyu” are increasingly competing with “Hollywood”—either replacing it or filling a void in places where it never held sway. This critical multidisciplinary anthology places the mediascapes of India (the site of Bollywood), South Korea (fountainhead of Hallyu, aka the Korean Wave), and the United States (the site of Hollywood) in comparative dialogue to explore the transnational flows of technology, capital, and labor. It asks what sorts of political and economic shifts have occurred to make India and South Korea important alternative nodes of techno-cultural production, consumption, and contestation. By adopting comparative perspectives and mobile methodologies and linking popular culture to the industries that produce it as well as the industries it supports, Pop Empires connects films, music, television serials, stardom, and fandom to nation-building, diasporic identity formation, and transnational capital and labor. Additionally, via the juxtaposition of Bollywood and Hallyu, as not only synecdoches of national affiliation but also discursive case studies, the contributors examine how popular culture intersects with race, gender, and empire in relation to the global movement of peoples, goods, and ideas.

Islands of Empire

Pop Culture and U.S. Power

Author: Camilla Fojas

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 252

View: 789

Camilla Fojas explores a broad range of popular culture media—film, television, journalism, advertisements, travel writing, and literature—with an eye toward how the United States as an empire imagined its own military and economic projects. Impressive in its scope, Islands of Empire looks to Cuba, Guam, Hawai'i, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines, asking how popular narratives about these island outposts expressed the attitudes of the continent throughout the twentieth century. Through deep textual readings of Bataan, Victory at Sea, They Were Expendable, and Back to Bataan (Philippines); No Man Is an Island and Max Havoc: Curse of the Dragon (Guam); Cuba, Havana, and Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights (Cuba); Blue Hawaii, Gidget Goes Hawaiian, and Paradise, Hawaiian Style (Hawai'i); and West Side Story, Fame, and El Cantante (Puerto Rico), Fojas demonstrates how popular texts are inseparable from U.S. imperialist ideology. Drawing on an impressive array of archival evidence to provide historical context, Islands of Empire reveals the role of popular culture in creating and maintaining U.S. imperialism. Fojas's textual readings deftly move from location to location, exploring each island's relationship to the United States and its complementary role in popular culture. Tracing each outpost's varied and even contradictory political status, Fojas demonstrates that these works of popular culture mirror each location's shifting alignment to the U.S. empire, from coveted object to possession to enemy state.

A History of Popular Culture in Japan

From the Seventeenth Century to the Present

Author: Everett Taylor Atkins

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Japan

Page: 276

View: 510

The worst which has been thought and said? : Defining popular culture -- Floating worlds : the birth of popular culture in Japan -- Delicate dancing : early modern Japan's culture wars -- Popular culture as subject and object of Meiji modernization -- Cultural living : cosmopolitan modernism in imperial Japan -- Entertaining empire : popular culture as a "technology of imperialism" -- "Our spirit against their steel" : mobilizing culture for war -- Democracy, monstrosity, and pensive prosperity : postwar pop -- Millennial Japan as dream factory -- Afterword : Contemplating cool.

Johann Strauss and Vienna

Operetta and the Politics of Popular Culture

Author: Camille Crittenden

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 332

View: 974

The transformation of Vienna and the Habsburg Empire at the end of the nineteenth century was accompanied by the development of a new musical genre, Viennese operetta, and no composer was better suited than Johann Strauss to express his native city's pride and anxiety during this period. Camille Crittenden provides an overview of Viennese operetta, then takes Strauss's works as a series of case studies in the interaction between stage works and audience. The book also examines Strauss's role as national icon during his lifetime and throughout the twentieth century.

Lex Populi

The Jurisprudence of Popular Culture

Author: William P. MacNeil

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 241

View: 817

This is a book about jurisprudence—or legal philosophy. The legal philosophical texts under consideration are—to say the least—unorthodox. Tolkien, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Harry Potter, Million Dollar Baby, and other cultural products are all referenced as exemplary instances of what the author calls lex populi—“people’s” or “pop law.” There, more than anywhere else, will one find the leading issues of legal philosophy. These issues, however, are heavily coded, for few of these pop cultural texts announce themselves as expressly legal. Nonetheless, Lex Populi reads these texts “jurisprudentially,” that is, with an eye to their hidden legal philosophical meanings, enabling connections such as: Tolkien’s Ring as Kelsen’s grundnorm; vampire slaying as legal language’s semiosis; Hogwarts as substantively unjust; and a seriously injured young woman as termination’s rights-bearer. In so doing, Lex Populi attempts not only a jurisprudential reading of popular culture, but a popular rereading of jurisprudence, removing it from the legal experts in order to restore it to the public at large: a lex populi by and for the people.

Versions Of Ireland

Empire, Modernity And Resistance In Irish Culture

Author: Eóin Flannery

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 201

View: 173

Versions of Ireland brings a refined postcolonial theoretical optic to bear on many of the most urgent questions within contemporary Irish cultural studies. Drawing on, and extending, the most advanced critical work within the discipline, the book offers a subtle critical genealogy of the development of Ireland’s diverse postcolonial projects. Furthermore, it reflects on the relevance and the effectiveness of postcolonial and subaltern historiographical methodologies in an Irish context, interrogating the ethical and political problematics of such discursive importation. Flannery’s work highlights the operative dynamics of imperial modernity, together with its representational agents, in Ireland, and also divines moments of explicit and implicit resistance to modernity’s rationalising and accumulative urges. The book is pioneering in the facility and ease with which it navigates the interdisciplinary terrain of Irish studies. Flannery provides enabling and challenging new readings of the poetry of the bi-lingual poet, Michael Hartnett; the politically imaginative vistas of the republican mural tradition in the North of Ireland; the gothic anxieties inherent in the fiction of Eugene McCabe and the semi-fictional writing of Seamus Deane, and the differential codes of visual surveillance apparent in Irish tourist posters and late nineteenth century photography in Ireland. Versions of Ireland does not dwell on the exclusively theoretical, but offers rich critical analyses of a range of Irish cultural artefacts in terms of Ireland’s protracted colonial history and contested postcolonial condition.

The Making of English Popular Culture

Author: John Storey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 234

View: 749

The Making of English Popular Culture provides an account of the making of popular culture in the nineteenth century. While a form of what we might describe as popular culture existed before this period, John Storey has assembled a collection that demonstrates how what we now think of as popular culture first emerged as a result of the enormous changes that accompanied the industrial revolution. Particularly significant are the technological changes that made the production of new forms of culture possible and the concentration of people in urban areas that created significant audiences for this new culture. Consisting of fourteen original chapters that cover diverse topics ranging from seaside holidays and the invention of Christmas tradition, to advertising, music and popular fiction, the collection aims to enhance our understanding of the relationship between culture and power, as explored through areas such as ‘race’, ethnicity, class, sexuality and gender. It also aims to encourage within cultural studies a renewed historical sense when engaging critically with popular culture by exploring the historical conditions surrounding the existence of popular texts and practices. Written in a highly accessible style The Making of English Popular Culture is an ideal text for undergraduates studying cultural and media studies, literary studies, cultural history and visual culture.

A History of Popular Culture in Japan

From the Seventeenth Century to the Present

Author: E. Taylor Atkins

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 290

"The first historical overview of popular culture in Japan from its origins in the 17th century to the present day, exploring themes of conflict, power, identity, and meaning in Japanese history"--Provided by publisher.

Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity

Author: Jason Dittmer

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 364

This innovative and engaging textbook is the first to survey the field of popular geopolitics, exploring the relationship between popular culture and international relations from a geographical perspective. Jason Dittmer connects global issues with the questions of identity and subjectivity that we feel as individuals, arguing that who we think we are influences how we understand the world. Each chapter focuses on a specific theme—such as representation, narrative, and affect—by explaining the concept and then considering some of the key debates that have revolved around it. Finally, each chapter illustrates its concept with a concrete case study, including first-person shooter video games, blogging, and comic books. Students will enjoy the text's accessibility and colorful examples, and instructors will appreciate the way the book brings together a diverse, multidisciplinary literature and makes it understandable and relevant.

Weapons of Mass Distraction

Soft Power and American Empire

Author: Matthew Fraser

Publisher: Hunter House

ISBN:

Category: Civilization, Modern

Page: 288

View: 704

Mao Zedong once warned that American pop cultural products were 'candy-coated bullets.' He was wrong on only one point: Their impact is much more powerful. One recent marketing study found that, around the world, the golden arches are now more widely recognized than is the Christian cross. That's soft power in action. Hard power refers to military resources. Soft power, a term originally coined by Harvard professor Joseph Nye, refers to symbolic resources. Soft power is cultural--everything from Madonna songs and Mickey Mouse to Big Macs and Coca Cola. These cultural icons, logos and brands are, says Matthew Fraser, weapons of mass distraction. This book examines the roll of pop culture in global diplomacy and argues, with well-researched historical evidence, that American global influence has depended on soft power advantages since the First World War, when Hollywood first emerged as an ally of the White House. Included are chapters on movies, television, music, fast food and theme parks. This provocative book is about American power--its sources, its influence and the deeply paradoxical reactions it provokes. It analyzes American soft power as a strategic resource in international affairs. Soft Power presents two alternatives for the coming world order: Will national identities decline as the world order is transformed into a state of electronic feudalism where there is no central power? Or will the American empire endure into the 21st century, as we continue to live under a Pax Americana?