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Feminist Periodicals and Daily Life

Women and Modernity in British Culture

Author: Barbara Green

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 494

This volume uncovers the ideas concerning everyday life circulating in the burgeoning feminist periodical culture of Britain in the early twentieth century. Barbara Green explores the ways in which the feminist press used its correspondence columns, women’s pages, fashion columns and short fictions to display the quiet hum of everyday life that provided the backdrop to the more dramatic events of feminist activism such as street marches or protests. Positioning itself at the interface of periodical studies and everyday life studies, Feminist Periodicals and Daily Life illuminates the more elusive aspects of the periodical archive through a study of those periodical forms that are particularly well-suited to conveying the mundane. Feminist journalists such as Rebecca West, Teresa Billington-Greig, E. M. Delafield and Emmeline Pethick Lawrence provided new ways of conceptualizing the significance of domestic life and imagining new possibilities for daily routines. /p>

Feminist Periodicals

A Current Listing of Contents

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Category: Feminism

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Women, Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1890s-1920s

The Modernist Period

Author: Binckes Faith Binckes

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

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Category: British periodicals

Page: 488

View: 663

New perspectives on women's contributions to periodical culture in the era of modernismThis collection highlights the contributions of women writers, editors and critics to periodical culture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It explores women's role in shaping conversations about modernism and modernity across varied aesthetic and ideological registers, and foregrounds how such participation was shaped by a wide range of periodical genres. The essays focus on well-known publications and introduce those as yet obscure and understudied - including middlebrow and popular magazines, movement-based, radical papers, avant-garde titles and classic Little Magazines. Examining neglected figures and shining new light on familiar ones, the collection enriches our understanding of the role women played in the print culture of this transformative period.Key FeaturesHelps recover neglected women writers and cast new light on canonical onesHighlights the geographical diversity of modern British print cultureEmphasises the interdisciplinary nature of modernism, including essays on modernist dance, music, cinema, drama and architecture Includes a section on social movement periodicals

Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939

The Interwar Period

Author: Catherine Clay

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

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Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 667

A fresh perspective on the hugely successful Latin American films released at the turn of the 21st century

Women's Experience of Modernity, 1875–1945

Author: Ann L. Ardis

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press+ORM

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 631

A collection of essays on women’s history and literary production at the turn of the twentieth century that centers the feminine phenomena. Analyzing such cultural practices as selling and shopping, political and social activism, urban field work and rural labor, radical discourses on feminine sexuality, and literary and artistic experimentation, this volume contributes to the rich vein of current feminist scholarship on the “gender of modernism” and challenges the assumption that modernism rose naturally or inevitably to the forefront of the cultural landscape at the turn of the twentieth century. During this period, “women’s experience” was a rallying cry for feminists, a unifying cause that allowed women to work together to effect social change and make claims for women’s rights. However, it also proved to be a source of great divisiveness among women, for claims about its universality quickly unraveled to reveal the classism, racism, and Eurocentrism of various feminist activities and organizations. The essays in this volume examine both literary and non-literary writings of Jane Addams, Djuna Barnes, Toru Dutt, Radclyffe Hall, H.D., Pauline Hopkins, Emma Dunham Kelley, Amy Levy, Alice Meynell, Bram Stoker, Ida B. Wells, Rebecca West, and others. Instead of focusing exclusively or even centrally on modernism and literature, these essays address a broad array of textual materials, from political pamphlets to gynecology textbooks, as they investigate women’s responses to the rise of commodity capitalism, middle-class women’s entrance into the labor force, the welfare state’s invasion of the working-class home, and the intensified eroticization of racial and class differences.

Sentenced to Everyday Life

Feminism and the Housewife

Author: Lesley Johnson

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Academic

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Category: Social Science

Page: 182

View: 538

The history of the housewife is a complicated and uneasy narrative, rife with contradictions, tensions, and unanswered questions. What is the relationship between women and the home? And why are women reluctant to call themselves housewives? Starting with an exploration of why 1940s housewives became associated with drudgery, this book examines how magazines and advertising articulated connected women with the domestic sphere, while 1950s films explored the shifting boundaries between social, family, and individual desires and constraints for women. Johnson and Lloyd also study the home as a site of boredom, and the balance between work and family in the modern world. By situating their examination in a still unresolved and contemporary topic, Johnson and Lloyd offer us both a backward glance and a forward-looking perspective into domesticity and the modern self.

Feminism and the Servant Problem

Author: Laura Schwartz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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Category: History

Page: 248

View: 469

Reveals a hidden history of women's suffrage from the perspectives of working-class women employed as domestic servants.

Front Pages, Front Lines

Media and the Fight for Women's Suffrage

Author: Linda Steiner

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

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Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 299

Suffragists recognized that the media played an essential role in the women's suffrage movement and the public's understanding of it. From parades to going to jail for voting, activists played to the mass media of their day. They also created an energetic niche media of suffragist journalism and publications. This collection offers new research on media issues related to the women's suffrage movement. Contributors incorporate media theory, historiography, and innovative approaches to social movements while discussing the vexed relationship between the media and debates over suffrage. Aiming to correct past oversights, the essays explore overlooked topics such as coverage by African American and Mormon-oriented media, media portrayals of black women in the movement, suffragist rhetorical strategies, elites within the movement, suffrage as part of broader campaigns for social transformation, and the influence views of white masculinity had on press coverage. Contributors: Maurine H. Beasley, Sherilyn Cox Bennion, Jinx C. Broussard, Teri Finneman, Kathy Roberts Forde, Linda M. Grasso, Carolyn Kitch, Brooke Kroeger, Linda J. Lumsden, Jane Marcellus, Jane Rhodes, Linda Steiner, and Robin Sundaramoorthy

Victorian Periodicals Review

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Category: English periodicals

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An Ethic of Innocence

Pragmatism, Modernity, and Women's Choice Not to Know

Author: Kristen L. Renzi

Publisher: SUNY Press

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 390

Offers a feminist theory of ignorance that sheds light on the misunderstood or overlooked epistemic practices of women in literature. An Ethic of Innocence examines representations of women in American and British fin-de-siècle and modern literature who seem “not to know” things. These naïve fools, Pollyannaish dupes, obedient traditionalists, or regressive anti-feminists have been dismissed by critics as conservative, backward, and out of sync with, even threatening to, modern feminist goals. Grounded in the late nineteenth century’s changing political and generic representations of women, this book provides a novel interpretative framework for reconsidering the epistemic claims of these women. Kristen L. Renzi analyzes characters from works by Henry James, Frank Norris, Ann Petry, Rebecca West, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, and others, to argue that these feminine figures who choose not to know actually represent and model crucial pragmatic strategies by which modern and contemporary subjects navigate, survive, and even oppose gender oppression. “An Ethic of Innocence recalibrates the critical landscape, revealing blind spots in contemporary models for thinking about knowledge and agency within a feminine context. The author builds a persuasive case from powerful close readings of texts, which invite readers to question their assumptions. I cannot now imagine the field of feminist modernist studies without the interventions of this project.” — Barbara Green, author of Feminist Periodicals and Daily Life: Women and Modernity in British Culture “This is a fascinating and very interesting intervention about the construction of knowledge/innocence within the field of literary studies. Anyone teaching or studying this period will find it of great use.” — Stephanie A. Smith, author of Conceived by Liberty: Maternal Figures and Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Time and Tide

The Feminist and Cultural Politics of a Modern Magazine

Author: Catherine Clay

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

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Category: Literary Collections

Page: 408

View: 296

Scrutinises the political strategies and ideological evolution of Islamist actors and forces following the Arab uprisings

Feminisms

A Global History

Author: Lucy Delap

Publisher: Penguin UK

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Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 833

How has feminism developed? What have feminists achieved? What can we learn from the global history of feminism? Feminism is the ongoing story of a profound historical transformation. Despite being repeatedly written off as a political movement that has achieved its aim of female liberation, it has been continually redefined as new generations of women campaign against the gender inequity of their age. In this absorbing book, historian Lucy Delap challenges the simplistic narrative of 'feminist waves' - a sequence of ever more progressive updates - showing instead that feminists have been motivated by the specific concerns of their historical moment. Drawing on an extraordinary range of examples from Japan to Russia, Egypt to Germany, Delap explores different feminist projects to show that those who are part of this movement have not always agreed on a single programme. This diverse history of feminism, she argues, can help us better navigate current debates and controversies. A tour de force from an award-winning expert, Feminisms shows that a rich relationship to the past can infuse today's activism with a sense possibility and inspiration.

Fashion and Authorship

Literary Production and Cultural Style from the Eighteenth to the Twenty-First Century

Author: Gerald Egan

Publisher: Springer Nature

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 649

Studies of fashion and literature in recent decades have focused primarily on representations of clothing and dress within literary texts. But what about the author? How did he dress? What where her shopping practices and predilections? What were his alliances with modishness, stylishness, fashion? The essays in this book explore these and other questions as they look at authors from the eighteenth century through the postmodern and digital eras, cultural producers who were also men and women of fashion: Alexander Pope, Hester Thrale, Mary Robinson, Lord Byron, William Thackeray, Charlotte Bronte, Wilkie Collins, Margaret Oliphant, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, Trudi Kanter, Angela Carter, and Martin Margiela. The essays collected here ultimately converge upon a fundamental question: what happens to our notions of timeless literature when authorship itself is implicated in the transient and the temporary, the cycles and materials of fashion? “Gerald Egan’s provocative introduction to this exciting new book poses a bold question: How are authorship and literature – so often linked to ideas of transcendence – implicated in the transient trends and stuff of fashion? The thirteen chapters that follow track authorship’s complex implication in the discourses and materiality of fashion and fashionable goods from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Wide-ranging in discipline and chronology, yet forensically focused and carefully argued, this book makes a striking and wonderfully original contribution to studies of authorship, celebrity and material culture.” — Dr Jennie Batchelor, Professor of Eighteenth-Century Studies,University of Kent, UK

The British Women's Suffrage Campaign

National and International Perspectives

Author: June Purvis

Publisher: Routledge

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Category: History

Page: 246

View: 361

This book brings together twelve chapters from feminist historians from around the world to offer new perspectives on aspects of the campaign for women’s suffrage in Britain. Although the focus is on Britain, this volume signals how the women’s suffrage campaign in Britain embraced both national and global aspects. The historical developments and structures that affected women’s lives and suffrage struggles were not limited to national contexts. Early chapters focus on particular individuals both well and lesser known, including Millicent Garrett Fawcett and Emmeline Pankhurst, as well as Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy, Princess Sophia Duleep Singh, Lady Isabel Margesson and Isabella Ford. Later chapters highlight the interrelationship between the British movement and suffrage campaigns across the globe with reference to Austria, Japan, New Zealand, Australia and the USA. The chapters deal with issues around strategies, social class, employment, religion, nationalism, empire and race and explore complex issues about women’s roles in campaigning for their democratic right to the parliamentary vote. Offering the reader a broad view of the British women’s suffrage movement, this is the ideal volume for students of women’s and political history in both its national and international contexts.

New Books on Women and Feminism

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Category: Feminism

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Liberation in Print

Feminist Periodicals and Social Movement Identity

Author: Agatha Beins

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

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Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 382

Introduction origins and reproductions -- Printing feminism -- Locating feminism -- Doing feminism -- Invitations to women's liberation -- Imaging and imagining revolution -- Conclusion feminism redux

Daily Life of Victorian Women

Author: Lydia Murdoch

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

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Category: History

Page: 286

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Explores the complexities of the lived experiences of Victorian women in the home, the workplace, and the empire as well as the ideals of womanhood and femininity that developed during the 19th century. • Gives extensive attention to the experiences of working-class women as well as elite women • Examines the connections and seeming contradictions between ideology and experience—for example, why did the Victorian concept of women as the "angel in the house" remain so powerful if the reality of women's experiences was largely unlike this ideal? • Spotlights topics from recent scholarship on women and imperialism • Provides clear, engaging information for undergraduates and general readers that is easily searchable by topic Includes many primary source selections and illustrations, making it a valuable classroom resource

Subscription Theater

Democracy and Drama in Britain and Ireland, 1880-1939

Author: Matthew Franks

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

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Category: History

Page: 296

View: 123

Subscription Theater asks why turn-of-the-century British and Irish citizens spent so much time, money, and effort adding their names to subscription lists. Shining a spotlight on private play-producing clubs, public repertory theaters, amateur drama groups, and theatrical magazines, Matthew Franks locates subscription theaters in a vast constellation of civic subscription initiatives, ranging from voluntary schools and workers' hospitals to soldiers' memorials and Diamond Jubilee funds. Across these enterprises, Franks argues, subscribers created their own spaces for performing social roles from which they had long been excluded. Whether by undermining the authority of the Lord Chamberlain's Examiner of Plays and London's commercial theater producers, or by extending rights to disenfranchised women and property-less men, a diverse cast of subscribers including typists, plumbers, and maids acted as political representatives for their fellow citizens, both inside the theater and far beyond it. Citizens prized a "democratic" or "representative" subscription list as an end in itself, and such lists set the stage for the eventual public subsidy of subscription endeavors. Subscription Theater points to the importance of printed ephemera such as programs, tickets, and prospectuses in questioning any assumption that theatrical collectivity is confined to the live performance event. Drawing on new media as well as old, Franks uses a database of over 23,000 stage productions to reveal that subscribers introduced nearly a third of the plays that were most frequently revived between 1890 and the mid-twentieth century, as well as nearly half of all new translations, and they were instrumental in staging the work of such writers as Shaw and Ibsen, whose plays featured subscription lists as a plot point or prop. Although subscribers often are blamed for being a conservative force in theater, Franks demonstrates that they have been responsible for how we value audience and repertoire today, and their history offers a new account of the relationship between ephemera, drama, and democracy.

Feminism and the Periodical Press, 1900-1918

Author: Lucy Delap

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

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Category: Feminism

Page: 1560

View: 381

The Edwardian period experienced a particularly vibrant periodical culture, with phenomenal growth in the numbers of titles published that were either aimed specifically at women, or else saw women as a key section of their readership or contributor group. It was an era of political ferment in which a number of 'progressive' traditions were formulated, shaped or abandoned, including socialism, feminism, modernism, empire politics, trade unionism and welfarism. Organized around some of the central themes of political thought and utopian thinking, this impressive collection gathers together classic articles from key periodicals. The set presents a comprehensive sourcebook of readings on Edwardian/Progressive era feminist thought, exploring the intervention of the radical public intellectuals working in these traditions in North America and the UK from 1900-1918.

America, History and Life

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Category: Canada

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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.