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Horace's Iambic Criticism

Casting Blame (Iambikē Poiēsis)

Author: Timothy S. Johnson

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 328

View: 204

By examining the relationship of the iambic tradition with ritual, this book studies how Horace’s Epodes are more than partisan (consolidating Octavian’s victory by projecting hostilities onto powerless others) but a meta-partisan project (forming fractured entities into a diversified unity).

Horace's Epodes

Contexts, Intertexts, and Reception

Author: Philippa Bather

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 304

View: 286

Horace's Epodes rank among the most under-valued texts of the early Roman principate. Abrasive in style and riddled with apparent inconsistencies, the Epodes have divided critics from the outset, infuriating and delighting them in equal measure. This collection of essays on the Epodes by new and established scholars seeks to overturn this work's ill-famed reputation and to reassert its place as a valid and valued member of Horace's literary corpus. Building upon a recent surge in scholarly interest in the Epodes, the volume goes one step further by looking beyond the collection itself to highlight the importance of intertext, context, and reception. Covering a wide range of topics including the iambic tradition and aspects of gender, it begins with a consideration of the influences of Greek iambic upon the Epodes and ends with a discussion on their reception during the seventeenth century and beyond. By focusing on the connections that can be drawn between the Epodes and other (ancient) works, as well as between the Epodes themselves, the volume will appeal to new and seasoned readers of the poems. In doing so it demonstrates that this smallest, and seemingly most insignificant, of Horace's works is worthy of a place alongside the much-lauded Satires and Odes.

Concepts and Functions of Philhellenism

Aspects of a Transcultural Movement

Author: Martin Vöhler

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 299

View: 751

Key aspects of philhellenism – political self-determination, freedom, beauty, individual greatness – originate in antiquity and present a complex reception history. The force of European philhellenism derives from ancient Roman idealizations, which have been drawn on by European movements since the Enlightenment. How is philhellenism able to transcend national, cultural and epochal limits? The articles collected in this volume deal with (1) the ancient conceptualization of philhellenism, (2) the actualization and politicization of the term at the time of the European Restoration (1815–30), and (3) the transformation of philhellenism into a pan-European movement. During the Greek struggle for independence the different receptions of philhellenism regain a common focus; philhellenism becomes an inextricable element in the creation of a pan-European identity and a starting point for the regeneration and modernization of Greece. – It is easy to criticize the tradition of philhellenism as being simplistic, naïve, and self-serving, but there is an irreducibly utopian element in later philhellenic idealizations of ancient Greece.

Horace Between Freedom and Slavery

The First Book of Epistles

Author: Stephanie McCarter

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 271

During the Roman transition from Republic to Empire in the first century B.C.E., the poet Horace found his own public success in the era of Emperor Augustus at odds with his desire for greater independence. In Horace between Freedom and Slavery, Stephanie McCarter offers new insights into Horace's complex presentation of freedom in the first book of his Epistles and connects it to his most enduring and celebrated moral exhortation, the golden mean. She argues that, although Horace commences the Epistles with an uncompromising insistence on freedom, he ultimately adopts a middle course. She shows how Horace explores in the poems the application of moderate freedom first to philosophy, then to friendship, poetry, and place. Rather than rejecting philosophical masters, Horace draws freely on them without swearing permanent allegiance to any—a model for compromise that allows him to enjoy poetic renown and friendships with the city's elite while maintaining a private sphere of freedom. This moderation and adaptability, McCarter contends, become the chief ethical lessons that Horace learns for himself and teaches to others. She reads Horace's reconfiguration of freedom as a political response to the transformations of the new imperial age.

A Translation and Interpretation of Horace’s Sermones, Book I

Author: Andy Law

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 491

View: 577

Horace’s book of Sermones (also called Satires) was his first published work. Rather than a collection of satirical sideswipes, as the genre might have dictated, the book is a wiry, tight, muscular, interlaced hexameter artwork of enormous originality and as far removed from the legacy of satirical writing he inherited as one can imagine. It is the work of a 29-year-old grappling with issues of personal and poetic identity during one of the most important and pivotal times in European history. Geographically, socially and genetically an outsider, Horace earned himself a seat at Rome’s top creative table, close to the heart of the political engine that was to change Rome forever. His book details a transformational journey from ‘nobody’ to ‘somebody’, and is a simultaneous invention of poet and reinvention of poetic genre. Horace’s Sermones have floated in and out of fashion ever since they first appeared, regularly eclipsed by his Odes. Today, rehabilitated, they find space in the higher levels of the school curriculum. This book provides unique insights and will be of interest to all classicists, as well as students studying core influences on European literature.

Horace

Author: Paul Allen Miller

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 132

Perhaps no classical writer has been so consistently in vogue as Horace. Famous in his own lifetime as a close associate of the Emperor Octavian, to whom he dedicated several odes, Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65–8 BC) has never really been out of fashion. Petrarch, for example, modelled his letters on Horace's innovative Epistles, while also borrowing from his Roman forebear in composing his own Italian sonnets. The echo of Horace's voice can be found in almost every genre of medieval literature. And in later periods, this influence and popularity if anything increased. Yet, as Paul Allen Miller shows, while Horace may justifiably be called the poet for all seasons he is also in the end an enigma. His elusive, ironic contrariness is perhaps the true secret of his success. A cultured man of letters, he fought on the losing side of the Battle of Philippi (42 BC). A staunch Republican, he ended up eagerly (some said too eagerly) promoting the cause of Julio-Claudian imperialism. Viewed as the acme of Roman literary civilization, he was shaped by his Athens education at Plato's famous Academy. This new introduction reveals Horace in all his paradoxical genius and complexity.

Horace: Satires Book II

Author: Horace

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 364

The satires explored in this volume are some of the trickiest poems of ancient Rome's trickiest poet. Horace was an ironist, sneaky smart, and prone to hiding things under the surface. His Latin is dense and difficult. The challenges posed by these satires are especially acute because their voices, messages, and stylistic habits are many, and their themes range from the poet's anxieties about the limits of satiric free speech in the first poem to the ridiculous excesses of an outrageously overdone dinner party in the last. For students working at intermediate and advanced levels of Latin, this book makes the satires of Horace's second book of Sermones readable by explaining difficult issues of grammar, syntax, word-choice, genre, period, and style. For scholars who already know these poems well, it offers fresh insights into what satire is, and how these poems communicate as uniquely 'Horatian' expressions of the genre.

Horace: Satires Book II

Author:

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 305

The Fiction of Occasion in Hellenistic and Roman Poetry

Author: Adrian Gramps

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 227

View: 357

The aim of this book is to devise a method for approaching the problem of presence in Hellenistic and Roman poetry. The problem of presence, as defined here, is the problem of the availability or accessibility to the reader of the fictional worlds disclosed by poetry. From Callimachus’ Hymns to the Odes of Horace, poets of this era repeatedly challenge readers by beckoning them to explore fictive spaces which are at once familiar and otherworldly, realms of the imagination which are nevertheless firmly rooted in the lived reality of the poets and their contemporaries. We too, when we read these poems, may feel simultaneously a sense of being transported to a world apart and of being seized upon by the poem’s address in the here and now of reading. The fiction of occasion is proposed as a new conceptual tool for understanding how these poems produce such problematic presences and what varieties of experience they make possible for their readers. The fiction of occasion is defined as a phenomenon whereby a poem is fictionally framed as part of a material event or ‘occasion’ with which the reader is invited to engage through the medium of the senses. The book explores this concept through close readings of key authors from the corpus of first-person poetry written in Greek and Latin between the 3rd century BCE and the 1st century CE, with a focus on Callimachus, Bion, Catullus, Propertius, and Horace. The ultimate purpose of these readings is to move towards developing a new vocabulary for conceptualising ancient poetry as an embodied experience.

Canidia, Rome’s First Witch

Author: Maxwell Teitel Paule

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 309

Canidia is one of the most well-attested witches in Latin literature. She appears in no fewer than six of Horace's poems, three of which she has a prominent role in. Throughout Horace's Epodes and Satires she perpetrates acts of grave desecration, kidnapping, murder, magical torture and poisoning. She invades the gardens of Horace's literary patron Maecenas, rips apart a lamb with her teeth, starves a Roman child to death, and threatens to unnaturally prolong Horace's life to keep him in a state of perpetual torment. She can be seen as an anti-muse: Horace repeatedly sets her in opposition to his literary patron, casts her as the personification of his iambic poetry, and gives her the surprising honor of concluding not only his Epodes but also his second book of Satires. This volume is the first comprehensive treatment of Canidia. It offers translations of each of the three poems which feature Canidia as a main character as well as the relevant portions from the other three poems in which Canidia plays a minor role. These translations are accompanied by extensive analysis of Canidia's part in each piece that takes into account not only the poems' literary contexts but their magico-religious details.

Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition

Author: Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 176

Quintilian famously claimed that satire was tota nostra, or totally ours, but this innovative volume demonstrates that many of Roman Satire's most distinctive characteristics derived from ancient Greek Old Comedy. Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill analyzes the writings of Lucilius, Horace, and Persius, highlighting the features that they crafted on the model of Aristophanes and his fellow poets: the authoritative yet compromised author; the self-referential discussions of poetics that vacillate between defensive and aggressive; the deployment of personal invective in the service of literary polemics; and the abiding interest in criticizing individuals, types, and language itself. The first book-length study in English on the relationship between Roman Satire and Old Comedy, Roman Satire and the Old Comic Tradition will appeal to students and researchers in classics, comparative literature, and English.

The Cambridge Companion to Catullus

Author: Ian Du Quesnay

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 867

Catullus is one of the most popular poets to survive from classical antiquity. Above all others he seems to speak to modern readers with a modern voice. The distinguished contributors to this Companion discuss the principal subjects which drew Catullus' affection and disgust, above all his famous affair with the woman he calls 'Lesbia', and situate him in the social, historical and intellectual context of first-century BC Rome. One of the so-called 'new poets', Catullus had a profound effect on subsequent Latin poetry, and this is explored especially for the Augustan age and the late first century AD. A significant part of the volume is concerned with Catullus' survival into the modern world. There are discussions both of the manuscript tradition and of the interpretative scholarship which has been devoted to his poetry, as well as his reception by renaissance and later poets. Students in particular will appreciate this book.

Iambic Ideas

Essays on a Poetic Tradition from Archaic Greece to the Late Roman Empire

Author: Alberto Cavarzere

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 263

View: 415

"With its judicious sampling of topics, each developed in impressive detail, Iambic Ideas itself rates as a perfectly brilliant idea. The book provides a much-needed sense of 'iambic' as a self-standing generic enterprise within the literatures of Greece and Rome, poetry that both writes and plays by its own rules. The book is thus a first of its kind, and fundamental to the study of verse invective in antiquity. -- Kirk Freudenburg, Ohio State University The collection is strong and provocative in both its breadth and its depth. Iambic Ideas is nicely produced, organized, and balanced. * Bryn Mawr Classical Review * Iambic Ideas offers a rich selection of essays from a range of international experts...Each contribution is of considerable value on its own merits, and the collection as a whole reveals both the coherence and the diversity of the 'genre.' * Greek and Rome, Oxford Academic Journals * The collection as a whole is useful and important. * Journal Of Roman Studies * Iambic Ideas is a must read for anyone interested in Greek and Roman poetry. These twelve thought-provoking essays are constructed to move beyond formal generic classifications and to focus on the broader continuities, interactions, and significance of the iambic impulse from the archaic to late antique. The temporal span of these essays enables the readers to gain access to material that might otherwise be unfamiliar and allows for a far richer understanding of poetic processes in play" -- Susan Stephens, Stanford University.

Callimachus' Iambi

Author: Clayman

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 460

The Roman Poets of the Augustan Age

Horace and the Elegiac Poets

Author: William Young Sellar

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 418

View: 183

A detailed discussion and analysis of Roman poetry written during the reign of Augustus, first published in 1891.

Brill's Companion to Horace

Author: Hans-Christian Günther

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 646

View: 346

This volume centres on a detailed analysis of the whole corpus of Horace’s work. It is preceeded by an account of Horace’s life and work and followed by two appendices on the transmission of the text and style and metre.

The Roman Poets of the Augustan Age

Author: William Young Sellar

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Elegiac poetry

Page: 362

View: 344

Harvard Studies in Classical Philology

Author: R. J. Tarrant

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 407

View: 881

Rumour and Renown

Representations of Fama in Western Literature

Author: Philip Hardie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 693

View: 138

Major study of the literary treatment of rumour and renown across the canon of authors from Homer to Alexander Pope, including readings in historiographical and dramatic texts, and authors such as Petrarch, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare and Milton. Of interest to students of classical and comparative literature and of reception studies.

The History and Anatomy of Auctorial Self-criticism in the European Middle Ages

Author: Anita Obermeier

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 799

This study outlines the history and anatomy of the European apology tradition from the sixth century BCE to 1500 for the first time. The study examines the vernacular and Latin tales, lyrics, epics, and prose compositions of Arabic, English, French, German, Greek, Icelandic, Italian, Spanish, and Welsh authors. Three different strands of the apology tradition can be proposed. The first and most pervasive strand features apologies to pagan deities and-later-to God. The second most important strand contains literary apologies made to an earthly audience, usually of women. A third strand occurs more rarely and contains apologies for varying literary offenses that are directed to a more general audience. The medieval theory of language privileges an imitation of the Christian master narrative and a hierarchical medieval view of authorship. These notions express a medieval philosophical concern about language and its role, and therefore the role of the author, in cosmic history. Despite the fact that women apologize for different purposes and reasons, their examples illustrate, on yet another level, the antifeminist subtext inherent in the entire apology tradition. Overall, the apology tradition characterized by interauctoriality, intertextuality, and intratextuality, enables self-critical authors to refer not only backward but also-primarily-forward, making the medieval apology a progressive strategy that engenders new literature. This study would be relevant to all medievalists, especially those interested in literature and the history of ideas.

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