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Illinois Historical Journal

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Category: Illinois

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View: 364

Illinois History

A Reader

Author: Mark Hubbard

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 791

A renaissance in Illinois history scholarship has sparked renewed interest in the Prairie State's storied past. Students, meanwhile, continue to pursue coursework in Illinois history to fulfill degree requirements and for their own edification. This Common Threads collection offers important articles from the Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society. Organized as an approachable survey of state history, the book offers chapters that cover the colonial era, early statehood, the Civil War years, the Gilded Age and Progressive eras, World War II, and postwar Illinois. The essays reflect the wide range of experiences lived by Illinoisans engaging in causes like temperance and women's struggle for a shorter workday; facing challenges that range from the rise of street gangs to Decatur's urban decline; and navigating historic issues like the 1822-24 constitutional crisis and the Alton School Case. Contributors: Roger Biles, Lilia Fernandez, Paul Finkelman, Raymond E. Hauser, Reginald Horsman, Suellen Hoy, Judson Jeffries, Lionel Kimble Jr., Thomas E. Pegram, Shirley Portwood, Robert D. Sampson, Ronald E. Shaw, and Robert M. Sutton.

American Educational History Journal

Volume 41 #1 & 2

Author: Paul J. Ramsey

Publisher: IAP

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 455

View: 452

The American Educational History Journal is a peer?reviewed, national research journal devoted to the examination of educational topics using perspectives from a variety of disciplines. The editors of AEHJ encourage communication between scholars from numerous disciplines, nationalities, institutions, and backgrounds. Authors come from a variety of disciplines including political science, curriculum, history, philosophy, teacher education, and educational leadership. Acceptance for publication in AEHJ requires that each author present a well?articulated argument that deals substantively with questions of educational history.

A Guide to the History of Illinois

Author: John Hoffmann

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 770

A guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. The second part includes 12 reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. "Reference & Research Book News" John Hoffmann's volume is the first comprehensive guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes full and careful descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. Eight chapters are devoted to specific areas, from 1673 to the present, while six chapters are thematic in nature, covering, for instance, the religious and educational history of the state, the voluminous literature on Chicago, and the subject of Abraham Lincoln in Illinois. These essays are preceded by introductory remarks on historical surveys, reference books, and periodicals in the field, studies of such topics as the medical and legal history of the state, and publications relating to maps and newspapers of Illinois. This long overdue guide will bring together the vast accumulation of primary and secondary materials that defines Illinois history. The nature and scope of this guide is unmatched by any previous work. The second part includes twelve reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. This section provides detailed information on specific collections within the context of related sources on particular periods and topics. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. As part of the series Reference Guides to State History and Research, this book provides a valuable resource for researchers, students, genealogists, and the interested public, and is an appropriate selection for reference collections in American, regional, or Illinois history.

Journal of Illinois History

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Category: Illinois

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View: 442

Roger C. Sullivan and the Triumph of the Chicago Democratic Machine, 1908-1920

Author: Richard Allen Morton

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 858

 Between 1908 and 1920, Roger C. Sullivan and his political allies consolidated their control of the Chicago and Illinois Democratic parties, creating the enduring structure known as the “Chicago Democratic machine.” Not a personal faction nor tied to any cause, it was a coalition of professional political operatives employing business principles to achieve legal profit and advantage. Sullivan was its chief organizer and first “boss,” rising to primacy after many political battles—with William Jennings Bryan, among others—and went on to become a kingmaker who helped Woodrow Wilson win the presidency. By the time of his death, Sullivan was widely respected, his achievements recognized even by those who deplored his politics. Based upon new research, this first comprehensive study of Sullivan and the early days of the Chicago “machine” focuses on the daily realities of the city’s politics and the personalities who shaped them.

Roger C. Sullivan and the Making of the Chicago Democratic Machine, 1881Ð1908

Author: Richard Allen Morton

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 612

Democratic Machine has become a fixture in American political history. Under Mayor Richard J. Daley, it acquired almost mythical (perhaps notorious) status. Yet its origins have remained murky--some say it began as a shady enterprise during the ethnic upheaval of the late 1920s. Based upon new research, this book offers a fresh perspective. Formed through factional warfare and consolidated with methods borrowed from the business world, the machine grew out of the unfettered capitalism of the late 19th century. Its principal founder and first "boss," Roger C. Sullivan, represented a generation of businessmen-politicians who emerged in the 1880s. Sullivan and his allies created an informal public power structure that, while serving their own interests, also made government more functional. The machine is a product of America's Gilded Age and the Progressive Era and offers a lesson in the advantages and limitations of representative government.

Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society

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Category: Illinois

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View: 599

A History of the Ninth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with the Regimental Roster

Author: Marion Morrison

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 143

View: 867

When the Civil War erupted in April 1861, many German immigrants in Illinois rushed to enlist in the Union Army. Volunteers from Illinois towns in St. Clair County - Belleville, Millstadt, Mascoutah, Lebanon, and others - marched to Springfield under the command of August Mersy, a veteran of the failed 1848 revolt in Baden, Germany. When these German immigrants reached Springfield, however, Mersy was rejected as commander because of his limited facility with English. Replaced by Colonel Eleazer A. Paine, an Ohioan and West Point graduate, Lieutenant Colonel Mersy fell to second in command of the Ninth Illinois Infantry Volunteers. As the two officers led the Ninth off to war, Mersy condemned Paine as a martinet and a politician. Within a few months, however, Paine received a promotion to general that left Mersy in charge of the Ninth. Once Grant began his Tennessee River campaign, the Ninth found itself in the thick of battle, bearing the brunt at Fort Donelson of the Confederate attempt to break Grant's siege lines. Less than two months later, the Ninth shored up sagging Union lines after the surprise Confederate attack at Shiloh Church, retreating only when their ammunition was gone. Depleted in numbers, the Ninth received 103 men from the 128th Illinois from Williamson County and 105 imprisoned deserters, who, under the influence of the veterans of the Ninth, became acceptable soldiers. After eighteen months of heavy fighting, the Ninth guarded supply lines. When the original three-year enlistment expired, only forty veterans from the original regiment reenlisted.

The Jury in Lincoln’s America

Author: Stacy Pratt McDermott

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 874

In the antebellum Midwest, Americans looked to the law, and specifically to the jury, to navigate the uncertain terrain of a rapidly changing society. During this formative era of American law, the jury served as the most visible connector between law and society. Through an analysis of the composition of grand and trial juries and an examination of their courtroom experiences, Stacy Pratt McDermott demonstrates how central the law was for people who lived in Abraham Lincoln’s America. McDermott focuses on the status of the jury as a democratic institution as well as on the status of those who served as jurors. According to the 1860 census, the juries in Springfield and Sangamon County, Illinois, comprised an ethnically and racially diverse population of settlers from northern and southern states, representing both urban and rural mid-nineteenth-century America. It was in these counties that Lincoln developed his law practice, handling more than 5,200 cases in a legal career that spanned nearly twenty-five years. Drawing from a rich collection of legal records, docket books, county histories, and surviving newspapers, McDermott reveals the enormous power jurors wielded over the litigants and the character of their communities.

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