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Live It Again 1947

Author: Annie's

Publisher: Annie's

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 130

View: 394

"Featuring the best of The Saturday Evening Post"--Cover.

I'd Live it Again

Author: J. M. Blakiston Houston

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 149

View: 394

Play it Again

Cover Songs in Popular Music

Author: George Plasketes

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 280

View: 589

The cover phenomenon in popular culture may be viewed as a postmodern manifestation in music as artists revisit, reinterpret and re-examine a significant cross section of musical styles, periods, genres, individual records, and other artists and their catalogues of works. The cover complex, with its multiple variations, issues, contexts, and re-contextualizations comprises an important and rich popular culture text. These re-recordings represent artifacts which embody artistic, social, cultural, historical, commercial, biographical, and novel meanings. Through homage, allusion, apprenticeship, and parody, among other modes, these diverse musical quotations express, preserve, and distribute popular culture, popular music and their intersecting historical narratives. Play it Again represents the first collection of critical perspectives on the many facets of cover songs in popular music.

The Diary of Anaïs Nin, 1944–1947

1944–1947

Author: Anaïs Nin

Publisher: HMH

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 533

The fourth volume of “one of the most remarkable diaries in the history of letters” (Los Angeles Times). The renowned diarist continues her record of her personal, professional, and artistic life, recounting her experiences in Greenwich Village for several years in the late 1940s, where she defends young writers against the Establishment—and her trip across the country in an old Ford to California and Mexico. “[Nin is] one of the most extraordinary and unconventional writers of [the twentieth] century.” —The New York Times Book Review Edited and with a preface by Gunther Stuhlmann

The "Jew" in Cinema

From The Golem to Don't Touch My Holocaust

Author: Omer Bartov

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 374

View: 527

Analyzes the image of the Jew in flims from the 1920s through the 1990s, in a number of countries (the USSR, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, East and West Germany, France, Italy, the USA, and Israel). Highlights the influence of stereotypes not only in antisemitic films, but also in pro-Jewish and anti-antisemitic ones, revealing how latent antisemitic images have been projected even in the latter two types of films. Contains a broad range of films, including Nazi documentaries and Hollywood films with Jewish or "Jewish" heroes (e.g. Paul Newman in "Exodus"). The sections deal with the "Jew" as perpetrator, victim, hero, and anti-hero. The analyses of many different films explore issues related to antisemitism and the Shoah. Celluloid images of the "Jew" have both reflected history and helped to mold it.

The Dream, 1947

Author: Winston S. Churchill

Publisher: Rosetta Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 25

View: 980

A powerful, emotional short story from the prime minister and Pulitzer Prize–winning author, detailing a conversation with the ghost of his beloved father. Legendary politician and military strategist Winston S. Churchill was a master not only of the battlefield, but of the page and the podium. Over the course of forty books and countless speeches, broadcasts, news items and more, he addressed a country at war and at peace, thrilling with victory but uneasy with its shifting role in global politics. In 1953, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature for “his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values.” During his lifetime, he enthralled readers and brought crowds roaring to their feet; in the years since his death, his skilled writing has inspired generations of eager history buffs. In this rare work of fiction, Churchill imagines a visit from the ghost of his father, Randolph. Churchill reveals to his father all that has happened in the world since his death in 1895, leaving out one crucial detail: his own critical role in determining the unfolding of world events. His yearning for his late father shines through his terse, careful prose, lending emotional weight and nostalgia to this unusual foray into fiction.

The Shaping of Indian Science: 1914-1947

Author:

Publisher: Universities Press

ISBN:

Category: Indian Science Congress

Page: 592

View: 718

This is a compendium of the speeches of the Presidents of the Indian Science Congress Association (ISCA) from 1914-2003. Through the years, these Presidents have inspired the Congress by their speeches-some of them visionary, some impassioned in their plea for Science, but all of them with a message that Science must be used for the good of the human race.

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

Author: Edmund Morris

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 960

View: 528

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time • WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE • WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD Although Theodore Rex fully recounts TR’s years in the White House (1901–1909), The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt begins with a brilliant Prologue describing the President at the apex of his international prestige. That was on New Year’s Day, 1907, when TR, who had just won the Nobel Peace Prize, threw open the doors of the White House to the American people and shook 8,150 hands, more than any man before him. Morris re-creates the reception with such authentic detail that the reader gets almost as vivid an impression of TR as those who attended. One visitor remarked afterward, “You go to the White House, you shake hands with Roosevelt and hear him talk—and then you go home to wring the personality out of your clothes.” The rest of this book tells the story of TR’s irresistible rise to power. (He himself compared his trajectory to that of a rocket.) It is, in effect, the biography of seven men—a naturalist, a writer, a lover, a hunter, a ranchman, a soldier, and a politician—who merged at age forty-two to become the youngest President in our history. Rarely has any public figure exercised such a charismatic hold on the popular imagination. Edith Wharton likened TR’s vitality to radium. H. G. Wells said that he was “a very symbol of the creative will in man.” Walter Lippmann characterized him simply as our only “lovable” chief executive. During the years 1858–1901, Theodore Roosevelt, the son of a wealthy Yankee father and a plantation-bred southern belle, transformed himself from a frail, asthmatic boy into a full-blooded man. Fresh out of Harvard, he simultaneously published a distinguished work of naval history and became the fist-swinging leader of a Republican insurgency in the New York State Assembly. He had a youthful romance as lyrical—and tragic—as any in Victorian fiction. He chased thieves across the Badlands of North Dakota with a copy of Anna Karenina in one hand and a Winchester rifle in the other. Married to his childhood sweetheart in 1886, he became the country squire of Sagamore Hill on Long Island, a flamboyant civil service reformer in Washington, D.C., and a night-stalking police commissioner in New York City. As assistant secretary of the navy under President McKinley, he almost single-handedly brought about the Spanish-American War. After leading “Roosevelt’s Rough Riders” in the famous charge up San Juan Hill, Cuba, he returned home a military hero, and was rewarded with the governorship of New York. In what he called his “spare hours” he fathered six children and wrote fourteen books. By 1901, the man Senator Mark Hanna called “that damned cowboy” was vice president of the United States. Seven months later, an assassin’s bullet gave TR the national leadership he had always craved. His is a story so prodigal in its variety, so surprising in its turns of fate, that previous biographers have treated it as a series of haphazard episodes. This book, the only full study of TR’s pre-presidential years, shows that he was an inevitable chief executive, and recognized as such in his early teens. His apparently random adventures were precipitated and linked by various aspects of his character, not least an overwhelming will. “It was as if he were subconsciously aware that he was a man of many selves,” the author writes, “and set about developing each one in turn, knowing that one day he would be President of all the people.”

The Religion of the Tempasuk Dusuns of North Borneo

Author: I. H. N. Evans

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 624

View: 585

This 1953 volume describes the Dusun people of the Tempasuk region in what was formerly North Borneo.

Muslims in India Since 1947

Islamic Perspectives on Inter-Faith Relations

Author: Yoginder Sikand

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 800

Muslims in India today are responding to the challenge of religious pluralism in a variety of ways. This book explores the attempts being made by scholar-activists and Muslim organisations to develop new understandings of Islam to relate to people of other faiths and to the modern nation-state, and to deal with issues such as democracy and secularism. It examines how a common predicament, characterised by a sense of siege and the perception of being an oppressed minority, is producing new expressions of Islam, some of which seek to relate to non-Muslims in terms of confrontation, and others which call for dialogue, reconciliation and inter-faith harmony.

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