Looking Down On Human Intelligence PDF EPUB Download

Looking Down On Human Intelligence also available in docx and mobi. Read Looking Down On Human Intelligence online, read in mobile or Kindle.

Looking Down on Human Intelligence

From Psychometrics to the Brain

Author: Ian J. Deary

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 379

View: 365

Why are some people more mentally able than others ? In an authoritative, critical and intergrated series of review essays Professor Ian Deary inquires after the cognitive and biological foundations of human mental ability differences. Many accounts of intelligence have examined the structure and number of human mental ability differences and whether they can predict sucess in education,work and social life. Few books have taken psychometric intelligence differences as a starting point and brought together the reductionistic attempts to explain them.New to the highly acclaimed Oxford Psychology Series, Looking Down on Human Intelligence appraises the search for the origins of psychometric intelligence differences in terms of brain function parameters. The book provides an original and thought provoking guide to ancient and modern research on one of the most compelling questions in human psychology.

Looking Down on Human Intelligence

From Psychometrics to the Brain

Author: Ian Deary

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 392

View: 830

Why are some people more mentally able than others ? In an authoritative, critical and intergrated series of review essays Professor Ian Deary inquires after the cognitive and biological foundations of human mental ability differences. Many accounts of intelligence have examined the structure and number of human mental ability differences and whether they can predict sucess in education,work and social life. Few books have taken psychometric intelligence differences as a starting point and brought together the reductionistic attempts to explain them.New to the highly acclaimed Oxford Psychology Series, Looking Down on Human Intelligence appraises the search for the origins of psychometric intelligence differences in terms of brain function parameters. The book provides an original and thought provoking guide to ancient and modern research on one of the most compelling questions in human psychology.

Intelligence: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Ian J. Deary

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 148

View: 284

People value their powers of thinking and most of us are interested in why some people seem to drive a highly tuned Rolls Royce brain while others potter along with a merely serviceable Ford Fiesta. This Very Short Introduction describes what psychologists have discovered about how and why people differ in their thinking powers. The book takes readers from no knowledge about the science of human intelligence to a stage where they are able to make judgements for themselves about some of the key questions about human mental ability differences. Each chapter deals with a central issue that is both scientifically lively and of considerable general interest, and is structured around a diagram which is explained in the course of the chapter. The issues discussed include whether there are several different types of intelligence, whether intelligence differences are caused by genes or the environment, the biological basis of intelligence differences, and whether intelligence declines or increases as we grow older. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Human Intelligence

An Introduction

Author: Robert J. Sternberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 528

View: 880

The most comprehensive, up-to-date, and readable textbook on human intelligence, written by leading experts in the field.

The Nature of Human Intelligence

Author: Robert J. Sternberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page:

View: 430

The study of human intelligence features many points of consensus, but there are also many different perspectives. In this unique book Robert J. Sternberg invites the nineteen most highly cited psychological scientists in the leading textbooks on human intelligence to share their research programs and findings. Each chapter answers a standardized set of questions on the measurement, investigation, and development of intelligence - and the outcome represents a wide range of substantive and methodological emphases including psychometric, cognitive, expertise-based, developmental, neuropsychological, genetic, cultural, systems, and group-difference approaches. This is an exciting and valuable course book for upper-level students to learn from the originators of the key contemporary ideas in intelligence research about how they think about their work and about the field.

IQ and Human Intelligence

Author: Nicholas John Mackintosh

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 440

View: 212

'What is intelligence?' may seem like a simple question to answer, but the study and measurement of human intelligence is one of the most controversial subjects in psychology. IQ and Human Intelligence provides an authoritative overview of the main issues surrounding this fascinating area.

Intelligence and Human Abilities

Structure, Origins and Applications

Author: Colin Cooper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 248

View: 553

Choice Recommended Read Psychological research into human intelligence and abilities presents us with a number of difficult questions: Are human abilities explained by a single core intelligence or by multiple intelligences? How should abilities be assessed? With tests unlike the problems which people normally have to solve, or with practical problems closer to those encountered in life, school and work? Do ability tests predict how a person will behave? If so, can they predict whether a person will succeed at school and at work? Intelligence and Human Abilities critically evaluates research evidence from the past 100 years to consider these and other issues. It shows that, despite the apparent contradictions in this research, the evidence in fact supports one coherent model, a fact which has clear implications for researchers, educators and test-users. This clear and engaging text provides an up-to-date evaluation of what the empirical evidence tells us about the number, nature and origins of human abilities. It will be essential reading for students and practitioners of psychology and education, and also for users of ability tests such as applied psychologists and personnel managers.

Intelligence: All That Matters

Author: Stuart Ritchie

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 160

View: 917

There is a strange disconnect between the scientific consensus and the public mind on intelligence testing. Just mention IQ testing in polite company, and you'll sternly be informed that IQ tests don't measure anything "real", and only reflect how good you are at doing IQ tests; that they ignore important traits like "emotional intelligence" and "multiple intelligences"; and that those who are interested in IQ testing must be elitists, or maybe something more sinister. Yet the scientific evidence is clear: IQ tests are extraordinarily useful. IQ scores are related to a huge variety of important life outcomes like educational success, income, and even life expectancy, and biological studies have shown they are genetically influenced and linked to measures of the brain. Studies of intelligence and IQ are regularly published in the world's top scientific journals. This book will offer an entertaining introduction to the state of the art in intelligence and IQ, and will show how we have arrived at what we know from a century's research. It will engage head-on with many of the criticisms of IQ testing by describing the latest high-quality scientific research, but will not be a simple point-by-point rebuttal: it will make a positive case for IQ research, focusing on the potential benefits for society that a better understanding of intelligence can bring.

Looking Down the Corridors

Allied Aerial Espionage Over East Germany and Berlin, 1945-1990

Author: Kevin Wright

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 950

This is the only book, written by experts with first-hand knowledge, to examine in detail the clandestine reconnaissance operations over East Germany during the Cold War era. Between 1945 and 1990 the wartime Western Allies mounted some of the most audacious and successful photographic intelligence collection operations using their freedom of access to the internationally agreed airspace of the Berlin Air Corridors and Control Zone that passed over a large area of East Germany. The operations were authorised at the highest political levels and conducted in great secrecy used modified transport and training aircraft disguised as normal transport and training flights exercising the Allies’ access rights to Berlin and its environs. For nearly 50 years these flights gathered a prodigious amount of imagery that was analysed by intelligence analysts to provide the western intelligence community with unique knowledge of the organisation and equipment of the Warsaw Pact forces. Using recently declassified materials and extensive personal interviews with those involved at all levels this book provides, for the first time, a detailed account and analysis of these operations and their unique contribution to the Cold War intelligence picture.

Superminds

The Surprising Power of People and Computers Thinking Together

Author: Thomas W. Malone

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 743

From the founding director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence comes a fascinating look at the remarkable capacity for intelligence exhibited by groups of people and computers working together. If you're like most people, you probably believe that humans are the most intelligent animals on our planet. But there's another kind of entity that can be far smarter: groups of people. In this groundbreaking book, Thomas Malone, the founding director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, shows how groups of people working together in superminds -- like hierarchies, markets, democracies, and communities -- have been responsible for almost all human achievements in business, government, science, and beyond. And these collectively intelligent human groups are about to get much smarter. Using dozens of striking examples and case studies, Malone shows how computers can help create more intelligent superminds simply by connecting humans to one another in a variety of rich, new ways. And although it will probably happen more gradually than many people expect, artificially intelligent computers will amplify the power of these superminds by doing increasingly complex kinds of thinking. Together, these changes will have far-reaching implications for everything from the way we buy groceries and plan business strategies to how we respond to climate change, and even for democracy itself. By understanding how these collectively intelligent groups work, we can learn how to harness their genius to achieve our human goals. Drawing on cutting-edge science and insights from a remarkable range of disciplines, Superminds articulates a bold -- and utterly fascinating -- picture of the future that will change the ways you work and live, both with other people and with computers.

Handbook of Intelligence

Evolutionary Theory, Historical Perspective, and Current Concepts

Author: Sam Goldstein

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 498

View: 856

Numerous functions, cognitive skills, and behaviors are associated with intelligence, yet decades of research has yielded little consensus on its definition. Emerging from often conflicting studies is the provocative idea that intelligence evolved as an adaptation humans needed to keep up with – and survive in – challenging new environments. The Handbook of Intelligence addresses a broad range of issues relating to our cognitive and linguistic past. It is the first full-length volume to place intelligence in an evolutionary/cultural framework, tracing the development of the human mind, exploring differences between humans and other primates, and addressing human thinking and reasoning about its own intelligence and its uses. The works of pioneering thinkers – from Plato to Darwin, Binet to Piaget, Luria to Weachsler – are referenced to illustrate major events in the evolution of theories of intelligence, leading to the current era of multiple intelligences and special education programs. In addition, it examines evolutionary concepts in areas as diverse as creativity, culture, neurocognition, emotional intelligence, and assessment. Featured topics include: The evolution of the human brain from matter to mind Social competition and the evolution of fluid intelligence Multiple intelligences in the new age of thinking Intelligence as a malleable construct From traditional IQ to second-generation intelligence tests The evolution of intelligence, including implications for educational programming and policy. The Handbook of Intelligence is an essential resource for researchers, graduate students, clinicians, and professionals in developmental psychology; assessment, testing and evaluation; language philosophy; personality and social psychology; sociology; and developmental biology.

The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence

Author: Robert J. Sternberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page:

View: 996

Written by the foremost experts in human intelligence. It not only includes traditional topics, such as the nature, measurement, and development of intelligence, but also contemporary research into intelligence and video games, collective intelligence, emotional intelligence, and leadership intelligence. In an area of study that has been fraught with ideological differences, this Handbook provides scientifically balanced and objective chapters covering a wide range of topics. It does not shy away from material that historically has been emotionally charged and sometimes covered in biased ways, such as intellectual disability, race and intelligence, culture and intelligence, and intelligence testing. The overview provided by this two-volume set leaves virtually no area of intelligence research uncovered, making it an ideal resource for undergraduates, graduate students, and professionals looking for a refresher or a summary of the new developments.

The General Factor of Intelligence

How General Is It?

Author: Robert J. Sternberg

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 520

View: 789

This edited volume presents a balanced approach to the ongoing debate of just how general the "general factor" of intelligence is. To accomplish this goal, the editors chose a number of distinct approaches to the study of intelligence--psychometric, genetic-epistemological, cognitive, biological, behavior-genetic, sociocultural, systems--and asked distinguished scholars to write from the standpoint of these approaches. Each approach comprises two chapters, one by a scholar leaning toward a view arguing for the greater generality of g, and the other by a scholar leaning toward a view arguing for the lesser generality of g. The scholars are not simply "for" or "against" these outlooks, rather they provide a more textured view of the general factor, attempting to explain it in psychological terms that are easily understandable. Intended for psychologists in all areas, including clinical, consulting, educational, cognitive, school, developmental, and industrial-organizational, this book will also be of interest to educators, sociologists, anthropologists, and those interested in the nature of intelligence.

Intelligence and the Brain

Solving the Mystery of why People Differ in IQ and how a Child Can be a Genius

Author: Dennis Garlick

Publisher: AESOP Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 246

View: 421

This book turns the corner and finally provides a convincing explanation of IQ and human intelligence. It begins by rejecting some of the most basic assumptions that psychologists make about intelligence, including that intelligence should be defined by behaviour. Instead, it argues that intelligence is about the ability to understand. It then uses recent scientific findings about the brain to show how changes in the brain lead to understanding. Readers will find that this book contains many revelations that will profoundly change their perception of how their own brain works. This book will also explore the startling implication of a "sensitive period" for developing intelligence, arguing that children can learn differently than adults. Anyone who is interested in how the brain works, why people differ in intelligence, and how a child can be a genius will want to read this book.

Human Intelligence

Author: Earl Hunt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page:

View: 639

This book is a comprehensive survey of our scientific knowledge about human intelligence, written by a researcher who has spent more than 30 years studying the field, receiving a Lifetime Contribution award from the International Society for Intelligence. Human Intelligence takes a non-ideological view of a topic in which, too often, writings are dominated by a single theory or social viewpoint. The book discusses the conceptual status of intelligence as a collection of cognitive skills that include, but also go beyond, those skills evaluated by conventional tests; intelligence tests and their analysis; contemporary theories of intelligence; biological and social causes of intelligence; the importance of intelligence in social, industrial, and educational spheres; the role of intelligence in determining success in life, both inside and outside educational settings; and the nature and causes of variations in intelligence across age, gender, and racial and ethnic groups.

The Architecture of the Child Mind

g, Fs, and the Hierarchical Model of Intelligence

Author: Marc H. Bornstein

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 228

View: 609

What exactly does it mean to be intelligent? Does intelligence manifest itself in one way or in different ways in children? Do children fit any preconceived notions of intelligence? Some theories assert a general (g) factor for intelligence that is universal and enters all mental abilities; other theories state that there are many separate domains or faculties (Fs) of intelligence; and still others argue that the g and Fs of intelligence coexist in a hierarchical relation. The Architecture of the Child Mind: g, Fs, and the Hierarchical Model of Intelligence argues for the third option in young children. Through state-of-the-art methodologies in an intensive research program conducted with 4-year-old children, Bornstein and Putnick show that the structure of intelligence in the preschool child is best construed as a hierarchically organized combination of a General Intelligence factor (g) and multiple domain-specific faculties (Fs). The Architecture of the Child Mind offers a review of the history of intelligence theories and testing, and a comprehensive and original research effort on the nature and structure of intelligence in young children before they enter school. Its focus on intelligence will appeal to cognitive, developmental, and social psychologists as well as researchers and scholars in education, particularly those specializing in early childhood education.

Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Development

Author: Robert L Burgess

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 452

View: 360

'Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Development' offers students a comprehensive introduction to the impact of evolutionary theory on human development, with contributions from leading scholars & researchers.

The Neuroscience of Intelligence

Author: Richard J. Haier

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page:

View: 331

This book introduces new and provocative neuroscience research that advances our understanding of intelligence and the brain. Compelling evidence shows that genetics plays a more important role than environment as intelligence develops from childhood, and that intelligence test scores correspond strongly to specific features of the brain assessed with neuroimaging. In understandable language, Richard J. Haier explains cutting-edge techniques based on genetics, DNA, and imaging of brain connectivity and function. He dispels common misconceptions, such as the belief that IQ tests are biased or meaningless, and debunks simple interventions alleged to increase intelligence. Readers will learn about the real possibility of dramatically enhancing intelligence based on neuroscience findings and the positive implications this could have for education and social policy. The text also explores potential controversies surrounding neuro-poverty, neuro-socioeconomic status, and the morality of enhancing intelligence for everyone. Online resources, including additional visuals, animations, questions and links, reinforce the material.

Essential Psychology

A Concise Introduction

Author: Mark N. O. Davies

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 472

View: 944

Essential Psychology: A Core Textbook offers both the specialist and non-specialist Psychology student the perfect companion at an affordable price. It represents a fresh alternative to the range of expensive, American-oriented titles on the market that are full of topics you need but also many you don’t need on your course. Written by a UK team of authors, it spans 18 accessibly-sized chapters but concentrates on the six fundamental topic areas that are taught at introductory level in the UK – Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Biological Psychology Social Psychology, Developmental Psychology & The Psychology of Individual Differences – batching them into sections of 3 chapters each. The textbook is: stylish and presented in full color has an abundance of learning features to make your studies enjoyable and fruitful includes a companion website (www.sagepub.co.uk./banyard) with a host of lecturer and student-focused material to assist both teaching and learning

Essential Psychology

Author: Philip Banyard

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 856

View: 308

The third edition of Essential Psychology provides a thorough introduction for students and anyone who wishes to gain a strong overview of the field. This team of authors provide a student-friendly guide to Psychology, with a vivid narrative writing style, features designed to stimulate critical thinking and inspire students to learn independently, and online resources for lecturers and students. This comprehensive introductory text is relevant for both the specialist and non-specialist psychology student, challenging those who studied psychology before university while remaining accessible to those who did not. The third edition: - Gives students a firm foundation in all areas covered on accredited British Psychological Society degree courses - Includes new chapters on psychopathology, research methods, language, motivation and emotion, lifespan development, health psychology, forensic psychology and critical social psychology - Relates theory to the real world to help students think about where they will employ their degree after undergraduate study

Best Books