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Losing Military Supremacy

The Myopia of American Strategic Planning

Author: Andrei Martyanov

Publisher: SCB Distributors

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 249

View: 810

"Marytanov explains why and how the US armed forces have lost the military supremacy they thought they once had and how Russia, which supposedly had been defeated in the Cold War, succeeded not only in catching up with USA, but actually surpassing it in many key domains such as long range cruise missiles, diesel-electric submarines, air defenses, electronic warfare, air superiority and many others. Andrei Martyanov's book is an absolute 'must read' for any person wanting to understand the reality of modern warfare and super-power competition." THE SAKER While exceptionalism is not unique to America, the intensity of their conviction and its global ramifications are. This view of its exceptionalism has led the US to grossly misinterpret—sometimes deliberately—the causative factors of key events of the past two centuries. Accordingly, the wrong conclusions have been derived, and very wrong lessons learned. Nowhere has this been more manifest than in American military thought and its actual application of military power. Time after time the American military has failed to match lofty declarations about its superiority, producing instead a mediocre record of military accomplishments. Starting from the Korean War the United States hasn’t won a single war against a technologically inferior, but mentally tough enemy. The technological dimension of American “strategy” has completely overshadowed any concern with the social, cultural, operational and even tactical requirements of military (and political) conflict. With a new Cold War with Russia emerging, the United States enters a new period of geopolitical turbulence completely unprepared in any meaningful way—intellectually, economically, militarily or culturally—to face a reality which was hidden for the last 70+ years behind the curtain of never-ending Chalabi moments and a strategic delusion concerning Russia, whose history the US viewed through a Solzhenitsified caricature kept alive by a powerful neocon lobby, which even today dominates US policy makers’ minds. Martyanov’s former Soviet military background enables deep insight into the fundamental issues of warfare and military power as a function of national power—assessed correctly, not through the lens of Wall Street “economic” indices and a FIRE economy, but through the numbers of enclosed technological cycles and culture, much of which has been shaped in Russia by continental warfare and which is practically absent in the US.

The (Real) Revolution in Military Affairs

Author: Andrei Martyanov

Publisher: SCB Distributors

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 225

View: 508

The liberal world order, a euphemism for American global hegemony, is crumbling at an accelerating pace. While its collapse is tangible, the outcome of such a collapse remains a matter of speculation and public debate. The US is desperately seeking to preserve the status quo, which rests primarily upon recognition of its military supremacy. For millennia, warfare has been a driving force behind changes in the geopolitical status of power configurations (whether of peoples, states or empires), and it remains so, today. Accordingly, short of actual warfare, the assessment (modeling) of relative military power plays an inordinate role in the determination of national status. Models of emerging changes in military capability range from relatively simple to extremely complex ones. Viewing the evolution of the current system of international relations outside the framework of actual, rather than propaganda-driven, military capabilities is not only useless, it is dangerous since states’ mistaken assessment of their own and other states’ military power can lead to misadventures and catastrophic mistakes. The United States’ efforts to preserve not just its dominance but the perception of its dominance are bound to fail for many important reasons, none more important than what is often misidentified in past American military-theoretical hypotheses about the future of warfare, known generically as the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA). This book explains why those hypotheses are failing and will continue to fail, and addresses the real RMA. In the end, technological development in weaponry as a response to tactical, operational and strategic requirements defines not only a nation’s geopolitical status but determines the global order. Assessments of military capacity, if reality-based, serve as good predictors of the level of volatility in international relations and the level of violence globally. This book gives an insight into the evolution of weapons and the way they influenced international relations in the 20th and 21st centuries. It also defines Revolution in Military Affairs as manifested via policy, politics, and technology. It reviews some models which are useful in assessing the current geopolitical situation. This book also tries to give a forecast of the future development of warfare and the ways in which it is going to change the whole system of the international relations, hopefully towards a new geopolitical equilibrium.

Aspects of Greek History, 750-323 BC

A Source-based Approach

Author: Terry Buckley

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 542

View: 565

Aspects of Greek History, 750 - 323 BCis an up-to-date textbook on ancient Greek history that, topic- by-topic, uses a wealth of original sources to interpret this history for those with little prior knowledge of the subject. Chapter by chapter, the relevant historical periods from the age of colonisation to Alexander the Great are reconstructed. The book covers the main literary sources: Aristotle, Diodorus, Herodotus, Plutarch, Thucydides, and Xenophon; Greek political and military history from the beginnings to Alexander's Battle of Gaugamela. It includes maps, a glosary of Greek terms, and a full bibliography. Overall, this is an indispensable collection of material for the student of classics as well as the general reader, who requires a grounding in Greek history.

Aspects of Greek History

A Source-Based Approach

Author: Terry Buckley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 608

Offers an indispensable introduction to the central period of Greek History for all students of classics. Chapter by chapter, the relevant historical periods from the age of colonization to Alexander the Great are reconstructed.

Aspects of Greek History 750–323BC

A Source-Based Approach

Author: Terry Buckley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 318

Offers an indispensable introduction to the central period of Greek History for all students of classics. Chapter by chapter, the relevant historical periods from the age of colonization to Alexander the Great are reconstructed.

Congressional Record

Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress

Author: United States. Congress

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 103

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

The Myth of Soviet Military Supremacy

Author: Tom Gervasi

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 548

View: 290

Questioning the necessity of the Reagan administration's program to rearm America, this study examines the balance of military power between the United States and the Soviet Union

Pages from a Black Radical's Notebook

A James Boggs Reader

Author: James Boggs

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 401

View: 428

Stephen M. Ward is assistant professor at the University of Michigan in the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies and the Residential College.

The Korean Conundrum

America's Troubled Relations with North and South Korea

Author: Ted Galen Carpenter

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 171

The US seems to be heading directly toward a confrontation with North Korea as Koreans in the south, and nations around the world, anxiously witness mounting tension. Carpenter and Bandow take a look at the twin crises now afflicting US policy in East Asia: the reemergence of North Korea's nuclear weapons program and the growing anti-American sentiment in South Korea. They question whether Washington's East Asia security strategy makes sense with the looming prospect of US troops stationed in South Korea becoming nuclear hostages. Carpenter and Bandow put forth the most provocative solution yet to this gnarled and dangerous situation.

A War It Was Always Going to Lose

Why Japan Attacked America in 1941

Author: Jeffrey Record

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 168

Jeffrey Record has specialized in investigating the causes of war. In The Specter of Munich: Reconsidering the Lessons of Appeasing Hitler (Potomac Books, Inc., 2006), he contended that Hitler could not have been deterred from going to war by any action the Allies could plausibly have taken. In Beating Goliath: Why Insurgencies Win (Potomac Books, Inc., 2007), Record reviewed eleven insurgencies and evaluated the reasons for their success or failure, including the insurgents' stronger will to prevail. Wanting War: Why the Bush Administration Invaded Iraq (Potomac Books, Inc., 2009) includes one of Record's most cogent explanations of why an often uncritical belief in one's own victory is frequently (but not always) a critical component of the decision to make war. Record incorporates the lessons of these earlier books in his latest, A War It Was Always Going to Lose: Why Japan Attacked America in 1941. The attack on Pearl Harbor is one of the most perplexing cases in living memory of a weaker power seeming to believe that it could vanquish a clearly superior force. On closer inspection, however, Record finds that Japan did not believe it could win; yet, the Japanese imperial command decided to attack the United States anyway. Conventional explanations that Japan's leaders were criminally stupid, wildly deluded, or just plumb crazy don't fully answer all our questions, Record finds. Instead, he argues, the Japanese were driven by an insatiable appetite for national glory and economic security via the conquest of East Asia. The scope of their ambitions and their fear of economic destruction overwhelmed their knowledge that the likelihood of winning was slim and propelled them into a war they were always going to lose.

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