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Mothering Without a Compass

White Mother's Love, Black Son's Courage

Author: Becky W. Thompson

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 112

Birth of an Adoptive, Foster or Stepmother

Beyond Biological Mothering Attachments

Author: Barbara Waterman

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 272

View: 391

Adoptive, foster and stepmothers, like biological mothers, find their lives completely changed by motherhood although they are not always granted the rights and privileges accorded to those who give birth. Barbara Waterman explores the common experiences that are shared by all those who enter the motherhood portal. She highlights the importance of wider family, community and professional support for non-biological parents and primary care-givers of both genders, and their children. A stepmother herself and a practicing psychologist, Waterman's writing is illustrated throughout with vignettes of children and parents from a range of backgrounds. She shows the important ways in which a non-biological attachment is both more similar to and more different from a biological attachment than is currently understood. In doing this, Waterman broadens the notion of the `traditional' family, and offers a positive alternative to the myth of the perfect mother. All kinds of step-, adoptive and foster families and those coming into contact with them will find this thoroughly researched and personal book an indispensable guide.

Setting the Moral Compass

Essays by Women Philosophers

Author: Cheshire Calhoun

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 384

View: 120

Setting the Moral Compass brings together the (largely unpublished) work of nineteen women moral philosophers whose powerful and innovative work has contributed to the "re-setting of the compass" of moral philosophy over the past two decades. The contributors, who include many of the top names in this field, tackle several wide-ranging projects: they develop an ethics for ordinary life and vulnerable persons; they examine the question of what we ought to do for each other; they highlight the moral significance of inhabiting a shared social world; they reveal the complexities of moral negotiations; and finally they show us the place of emotion in moral life.

Setting the Moral Compass : Essays by Women Philosophers

Essays by Women Philosophers

Author: Cheshire Calhoun Professor of Philosophy Colby College

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 161

Setting the Moral Compass brings together the (largely unpublished) work of nineteen women moral philosophers whose powerful and innovative work has contributed to the "re-setting of the compass" of moral philosophy over the past two decades. The contributors, who include many of the top names in this field, tackle several wide-ranging projects: they develop an ethics for ordinary life and vulnerable persons; they examine the question of what we ought to do for each other; they highlight the moral significance of inhabiting a shared social world; they reveal the complexities of moral negotiations; and finally they show us the place of emotion in moral life.

Good White People

The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism

Author: Shannon Sullivan

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 264

Argues for the necessity of a new ethos for middle-class white anti-racism. Building on her book Revealing Whiteness, Shannon Sullivan identifies a constellation of attitudes common among well-meaning white liberals that she sums up as “white middle-class goodness,” an orientation she critiques for being more concerned with establishing anti-racist bona fides than with confronting systematic racism and privilege. Sullivan untangles the complex relationships between class and race in contemporary white identity and outlines four ways this orientation is expressed, each serving to establish one’s lack of racism: the denigration of lower-class white people as responsible for ongoing white racism, the demonization of antebellum slaveholders, an emphasis on colorblindness—especially in the context of white childrearing—and the cultivation of attitudes of white guilt, shame, and betrayal. To move beyond these distancing strategies, Sullivan argues, white people need a new ethos that acknowledges and transforms their whiteness in the pursuit of racial justice rather than seeking a self-righteous distance from it.

Adopting Maternity

White Women who Adopt Transracially Or Transnationally

Author: Nora Rose Moosnick

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 174

View: 499

Examines issues surrounding adoption across racial and national lines and contrasts this with monoracial adoption, and provides feminist analysis of the experience of mothering adopted children.

Contemporary Feminist Pragmatism

Author: Maurice Hamington

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 292

View: 627

The notion of "feminist pragmatism" or "pragmatist feminism" has been around since Charlene Haddock Seigfried introduced it two decades ago. However, the bulk of the work in this field has been directed toward recovering the feminist strain of classical American philosophy, largely through renewed interest in the work of Jane Addams. This exploration of the origins of feminism and pragmatism has been fruitful in building a foundation for theoretical considerations. The editors of this volume believe the next logical step is the contemporary application to both theory and experience. Contemporary Feminist Pragmatism is the first book to address the modern significance of the nexus of feminism and pragmatism. The issues explored here include the relationship between community and identity, particularly around the impact of gender and race; reframing political practice regarding feminist pragmatist commitments including education, sustainability movements, and local efforts like community gardens; and the association between ethics and inquiry including explorations of Buddhism, hospitality, and animal-human relationships.

No Permanent Waves

Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminism

Author: Nancy A. Hewitt

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 472

View: 236

No Permanent Waves boldly enters the ongoing debates over the utility of the "wave" metaphor for capturing the complex history of women's rights by offering fresh perspectives on the diverse movements that comprise U.S. feminism, past and present. Seventeen essays--both original and reprinted--address continuities, conflicts, and transformations among women's movements in the United States from the early nineteenth century through today. A respected group of contributors from diverse generations and backgrounds argue for new chronologies, more inclusive conceptualizations of feminist agendas and participants, and fuller engagements with contestations around particular issues and practices. Race, class, and sexuality are explored within histories of women's rights and feminism as well as the cultural and intellectual currents and social and political priorities that marked movements for women's advancement and liberation. These essays question whether the concept of waves surging and receding can fully capture the complexities of U.S. feminisms and suggest models for reimagining these histories from radio waves to hip-hop.

Ideologies and Technologies of Motherhood

Race, Class, Sexuality, Nationalism

Author: Helena Ragoné

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 330

View: 210

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Giving Up Baby

Safe Haven Laws, Motherhood, and Reproductive Justice

Author: Laury Oaks

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 661

“Baby safe haven” laws, which allow a parent to relinquish a newborn baby legally and anonymously at a specified institutional location—such as a hospital or fire station—were established in every state between 1999 and 2009. Promoted during a time of heated public debate over policies on abortion, sex education, teen pregnancy, adoption, welfare, immigrant reproduction, and child abuse, safe haven laws were passed by the majority of states with little contest. These laws were thought to offer a solution to the consequences of unwanted pregnancies: mothers would no longer be burdened with children they could not care for, and newborn babies would no longer be abandoned in dumpsters. Yet while these laws are well meaning, they ignore the real problem: some women lack key social and economic supports that mothers need to raise children. Safe haven laws do little to help disadvantaged women. Instead, advocates of safe haven laws target teenagers, women of color, and poor women with safe haven information and see relinquishing custody of their newborns as an act of maternal love. Disadvantaged women are preemptively judged as “bad” mothers whose babies would be better off without them. Laury Oaks argues that the labeling of certain kinds of women as potential “bad” mothers who should consider anonymously giving up their newborns for adoption into a “loving” home should best be understood as an issue of reproductive justice. Safe haven discourses promote narrow images of who deserves to be a mother and reflect restrictive views on how we should treat women experiencing unwanted pregnancy.

Intercultural Alliances

Critical Transformation

Author: Mary Jane Collier

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 340

View: 231

The 25th volume of the International and Intercultural Communication Annual offers a variety of perspectives on culture, identity, and the formation of personal and political alliances.

Survivors on the Yoga Mat

Stories for Those Healing from Trauma

Author: Becky Thompson

Publisher: North Atlantic Books

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 328

View: 562

An inspiring collection of essays that reveal the healing power of yoga, Survivors on the Yoga Mat is an ideal companion for trauma survivors and yoga teachers alike. Weaving together stories from her classes, travels, and workshops, author Becky Thompson shows the brave and unique ways that survivors approach yoga: the creative ways that they practice, the challenges they face, and the transformative experiences they discover. Thompson skillfully draws connections between yoga and social-justice activism, demonstrating how a trauma-sensitive approach to yoga makes room for all of us—across race, class, gender, religion and nationality. Survivors on the Yoga Mat offers stories, reflections, and meditations for people who are healing from a wide range of traumas—sexual abuse, accidents, child abuse, war, illnesses, incarceration, and other injuries. The book consists of 90 true stories—alternately funny, surprising, and irreverent—that together provide a roadmap for survivors on their journey to wholeness. Organized into six sections, the book explores the challenges of beginning a yoga practice; the unique strengths of trauma survivors; the circuitous path of healing; yoga's value as a lifelong practice; the special role of teachers; and the potential of yoga as an avenue for activism. Also included is a description of Pantajali's Eight Limbs of Yoga, a list of resources, an appendix explaining the different styles of yoga, and a beautiful photo glossary with over 100 photos of the yoga postures mentioned in the book.

Adoption Matters

Philosophical and Feminist Essays

Author: Professor of Philosophy Sally Haslanger

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 320

View: 247

"As a social and legal institution of family formation, and as a personal experience of members of the adoption triad, adoption provides a fresh vantage point on an important set of philosophical and feminist issues. The family is often thought to be the basic and natural form of social life for human beings; adoption, however, highlights the powerful role that law and politics play in shaping families and our ideas about families. As a result, attention to the practices of adoption sheds light upon deeply held, but often tacit assumptions about what is natural and what is social in human life."—from the Introduction The institution of adoption has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years as the adoption world has undergone seismic shifts: the rise in international and transracial adoptions and the effects of global economics; adoption by gays and lesbians; increasing openness in the adoption process; and changes in domestic welfare policy on adoption. Adoption Matters adds to our understanding of reproduction, parenting, familial bonds, personal identity, self-knowledge, and contemporary social policy. The contributors to Adoption Matters explore a range of related topics, such as the manner in which interracial or international adoption affects the way we perceive the relationships among race, ethnicity, and culture and how class affects one's life prospects and choices. "In this distinctive collection of essays, the authors illuminate adoption by bringing feminist theory to bear on it, and they expand and enrich feminist theory by making it respond to their own personal experience as adoptive parents or as adoptees."—Joan Heifetz Hollinger, Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley, editor of Adoption Law and Practice and coeditor of Families by Law: An Adoption Reader "Adoption Matters courageously examines how adoption influences and challenges our society's understanding of the intersection of family and identity 'an intersection that is both deeply personal and highly political.'"—Abigail Garner, author of Families Like Mine: Children of Gay Parents Tell It Like It Is

A Promise and a Way of Life

White Antiracist Activism

Author: Becky W. Thompson

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 482

View: 594

Beginning with the diverse catalysts that started these activists on their journeys, this book demonstrates the contributions and limitations of white antiracism in key social justice movements."--BOOK JACKET.

Bridging

How Gloria Anzaldúa's Life and Work Transformed Our Own

Author: AnaLouise Keating

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 292

View: 629

The inspirational writings of cultural theorist and social justice activist Gloria Anzaldúa have empowered generations of women and men throughout the world. Charting the multiplicity of Anzaldúa's impact within and beyond academic disciplines, community trenches, and international borders, Bridging presents more than thirty reflections on her work and her life, examining vibrant facets in surprising new ways and inviting readers to engage with these intimate, heartfelt contributions. Bridging is divided into five sections: The New Mestizas: "transitions and transformations"; Exposing the Wounds: "You gave me permission to fly in the dark"; Border Crossings: Inner Struggles, Outer Change; Bridging Theories: Intellectual Activism with/in Borders; and "Todas somos nos/otras": Toward a "politics of openness." Contributors, who include Norma Elia Cantú, Elisa Facio, Shelley Fisher Fishkin, Aída Hurtado, Andrea Lunsford, Denise Segura, Gloria Steinem, and Mohammad Tamdgidi, represent a broad range of generations, professions, academic disciplines, and national backgrounds. Critically engaging with Anzaldúa's theories and building on her work, they use virtual diaries, transformational theory, poetry, empirical research, autobiographical narrative, and other genres to creatively explore and boldly enact future directions for Anzaldúan studies. A book whose form and content reflect Anzaldúa's diverse audience, Bridging perpetuates Anzaldúa's spirit through groundbreaking praxis and visionary insights into culture, gender, sexuality, religion, aesthetics, and politics. This is a collection whose span is as broad and dazzling as Anzaldúa herself.

Racist America

Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations

Author: Joe R. Feagin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 837

This second edition of Joe Feagin’s Racist America is extensively revised and thoroughly updated, with a special eye toward racism issues cropping up constantly in the Barack Obama era.

Sonia Sanchez's Poetic Spirit through Haiku

Author: John Zheng

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 615

This collection of ten critical essays is the first scholarly criticism of haiku by Sonia Sanchez. Her haiku, full of power and emotional voice for people, love, human nature, and African American experience, redefine haiku in English and African American poetic expression with her unique individuality.

Feminism and Antiracism

International Struggles for Justice

Author: France Winddance Twine

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 414

View: 979

A collection of international scholars and activists answer the questionshow does gender and region/nation play a defining role in how feminists engage in anti-racist practices? How has the restructuring in the world economy affected anti-racist organizing? How do Third World Feminists counter the perception that feminism is a "Western" ideology and how effective are their methods? What opportunities does globalization bring for cross-cultural organizing? From essays on the race and gender issues in organizing exotic dancers to resistance art in Africa and the U.S., this timely and necessary anthology will be sure to spark debate and controversy. Contributors: Angela Davis, Kathleen Blee, France Winddance Twine, Heater Merrill, Veronica Magar, Siobhan Brooks, Delores Walters, Michelle Rosenthal, Ellen Kaye Scott, andrea breen, Yoshiko Nozaki, Sohera Syeda, Becky Thompson, Paola Bacchetta, Carolyn Martin Shaw, Eileen O'Brien and Michael Armato, Jane Freedman, Cathleen Armstead, Ashwini Deshpande, and Minelle Mahtani.

Resisting Reality

Social Construction and Social Critique

Author: Sally Haslanger

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 490

View: 368

In this collection of previously published essays, Sally Haslanger draws on insights from feminist and critical race theory and on the resources of contemporary analytic philosophy to develop the idea that gender and race are positions within a structure of social relations. Explicating the workings of these interlocking structures provides tools for understanding and combatting social injustice.

Wicca: A Year and a Day

366 Days of Spiritual Practice in the Craft of the Wise

Author: Timothy Roderick

Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 408

View: 896

There are no short-cuts to becoming a Witch. Traditionally, students take a year and a day to prepare for their initiation into the Craft. Based on this age-old custom, Wicca: A Year and a Day is a one-of-a-kind daily guide that introduces Witchcraft over a 366-day cycle. Ideal for solitary students, this intensive study course teaches the core content of Wiccan practice: the tides of time, the wonders of the seasons, the ways of herbs and magic, the mysticism of the Old Ones, and the inner disciplines of seers and sages. Daily lessons include exercises, Wiccan theology and lore, and discussions relating to circle work, magical correspondences, holidays, deities, tools, healing, and divination.