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The Northern Isles

Orkney and Shetland

Author: Alexander Fenton

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 722

View: 269

The Northern Isles stand at a crossroads of North Atlantic Europe, subject to the competing influences of Scandinavia and Scotland. Sandy Fenton's detailed study of the material culture of Orkney and Shetland is combined with thorough linguistic analysis and is based on years of study and sifting of a mass of detail. Much of the material is new, based on extensive research by the author, on manuscript and other written sources and on knowledge freely imparted by many local inhabitants. It illuminates the complexity of numerous interlocking factors, draws a picture of a fascinating and varied existence and reveals the past not as a static tableau but a process of continuous change. This book recreates the physical environment in which the people lived, their crops and livestock, the harvest of the sea, their houses, the food they ate. These things dominated their lives and form the background which is the key to understanding the character of these fascinating islands. This major work has earned its place as a key contribution to European ethnology and won the Dag Stromback Award of the Royal Gustav Academy, Sweden.

The Northern Isles

Orkney and Shetland Sea Kayaking

Author: Tom Smith

Publisher: Pesda Press

ISBN:

Category: Sea kayaking

Page: 272

View: 617

A sea kayakers guide to the Orkney and Shetland Islands. Their relative isolation, stunning scenery and Norse history make Orkney and Shetland a very special place. For the sea kayaker island archipelagos are particularly rewarding . none more so than these. Illustrated with superb colour photographs and useful maps throughout, this book is a practical guide to help you select and plan trips. It will provide inspiration for future voyages and a souvenir of journeys undertaken. As well as providing essential information on where to start and finish, distances, times and tidal information, the book does much to stimulate interest in the environment. It is full of facts and anecdotes about local history, geology, scenery, seabirds and sea mammals.

Northern Isles

1669 Act for Annexation of Orkney and Shetland to the Crown, List of Lochs in Orkney, Northlink Ferries, Orkney Tunnel, Pando Scottish F

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 32

View: 549

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 28. Chapters: 1669 Act for annexation of Orkney and Shetland to the Crown, List of lochs in Orkney, NorthLink Ferries, Orkney tunnel, P&O Scottish Ferries, Pentland Ferries, Stroma, Scotland. Excerpt: Orkney (Scottish Gaelic: ) also known as the Orkney Islands, is an archipelago in northern Scotland, 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness. Orkney comprises approximately 70 islands of which 20 are inhabited. The largest island, known as the "Mainland" has an area of 523.25 square kilometres (202.03 sq mi) making it the sixth largest Scottish island and the tenth-largest island in the British Isles. The largest settlement and administrative centre is Kirkwall. The name "Orkney" dates back to the 1st century BC or earlier, and the islands have been inhabited for at least 8,500 years. Originally occupied by Mesolithic and Neolithic tribes and then by the Picts, Orkney was invaded and forcibly annexed by Norway in 875 and settled by the Norse. It was subsequently annexed to the Scottish Crown in 1472, following the failed payment of a dowry for James III's bride, Margaret of Denmark. Orkney contains some of the oldest and best-preserved Neolithic sites in Europe, and the "Heart of Neolithic Orkney" is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. Orkney is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, a constituency of the Scottish Parliament, a lieutenancy area, and a former county. The local council is Orkney Islands Council, one of only three Councils in Scotland with a majority of elected members who are independents. In addition to the Mainland, most of the islands are in two groups, the North and South Isles, all of which have an underlying geological base of Old Red Sandstone. The climate is mild and the soils are extremely fertile, most of the land being farmed. Agriculture is the most important sector of the economy...

Orkney

Northern Isles. [Made, Printed and Published by Ordnance Survey]

Author: Great Britain. Ordnance Survey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page:

View: 730

Perfect for day trips and short breaks, the OS Landranger Map series covers Great Britain with 204 detailed maps. Each map provides all the information you need to get to know your local area and includes places of interest, tourist information, picnic areas and camp sites, plus Rights of Way information for England and Wales.

Walking on the Orkney and Shetland Isles

80 walks in the northern isles

Author: Graham Uney

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 799

A guidebook to 80 walking routes on Scotland's Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland. Routes are described on the islands of Orkney (Orkney Mainland, Hoy, South Ronaldsay, Burray, Rousay, Eday, Westray, Papa Westray, North Ronaldsay) and the islands of Shetland (Shetland Mainland, West Burra, East Burra, Foula, Fair Isle, Isle of Noss, Bressay, Whalsay, Papa Stour, Muckle Roe, Out Skerries, Esha Ness, Yell, Fetlar and Unst). Routes vary in length from 1 mile to 16 miles, with something to suit all abilities. Offering a variety of landscapes together with a wealth of remarkable archaeological sites such as Skara Brae and Jarlshof, Orkney and Shetland are a walker's dream. Step-by-step route descriptions are accompanied by clear OS mapping and a time estimate for completing each route. The book includes plenty of information on the region's wildlife, archaeology and history, as well as practical tips such as when to go, what to take and getting to and around Orkney and Shetland. Quiet, remote and abounding in rare plants and wildlife, together with some of the world's most fascinating archaeological sites, Orkney and Shetland offer a treasure trove of natural and historic wonders, and makes an ideal walking holiday destination.

Scotland's Northern Lights

Lighthouses of the Orkney and Shetland Islands

Author: Sharma Krauskopf

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Lighthouses

Page: 71

View: 522

Some of Scotland's and the world's most spectacular lighthouses are located in the Northern Isles. This books discusses all 21 major lighthouses in the area most of which were built by the famous Stevenson family of lighthouses. The first and last Stevenson-engineered lighthouses are among them.

The Northern Isles

Author: Frederick Threlfall Wainwright

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Archaeology

Page: 224

View: 670

Steamers and Ferries of the Northern Isles

Author: Alistair Deayton

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Steamboats

Page: 144

View: 889

The story of the North Boats from the First World War to the present day.

Ancient History of Orkney, Caithness, & the North

Author: Þormóður Torfason

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Caithness (Scotland)

Page: 288

View: 553

The North Atlantic Front

The Northern Isles at War

Author: James Miller

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Orkney (Scotland)

Page: 228

View: 976

During the two World Wars, the island groups of Orkney, Shetland, the Faroes, and Iceland, linking Europe to North America, acquired great significance. This work tells of operations along this northern front, and recounts incidents such as the arrest of the staff of the Lerwick Post Office.

The Norn Language of Orkney and Shetland

Author: Michael P. Barnes

Publisher: Virago Press

ISBN:

Category: Norn

Page: 58

View: 339

For some 950 years a Scandinavian language was spoken in Orkney and Shetland. It was introduced into the islands by Viking settlers and became the dominant form of speech there. Norroena, or Norn as it was later called, remained the chief medium of oral and written communication in the Northern Isles throughout the Viking Age for much of the Middle Ages. This book traces the history of Norn, describes its principal features and provides a selection of Scandinavian-language texts from the Northern Isles accompanied by English translation and commentary.

A description of the isles of Orkney. [Followed by] An essay concerning the Thule of the ancients [by sir R. Sibbald]. [J. Wallace] in the ed. of 1700. Ed. by J. Small

Author: James Wallace (M.D.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 315

The Sea Kings of Orkney, and Other Historical Tales

Author: Charles Alfred Maxwell

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Orkney (Scotland)

Page: 436

View: 1000

British Islands Pilot

Author: United States. Hydrographic Office

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Pilot guides

Page:

View: 776

Encyclopaedia Britannica

Or A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and Miscellaneous Literature; Enlarged and Improved

Author: James Millar

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Page:

View: 921

Orkney and Shetland

An Archaeological Guide

Author: Lloyd Robert Laing

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Orkney

Page: 263

View: 513

A Brief Description of Orkney, Zetland, Pightland-Firth & Caithness

Wherein, After a Short Journal of the Author's Voyage Thither, These Northern Places are First More Generally Described

Author: John Brand

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Caithness (Scotland)

Page: 247

View: 160

Old-lore Miscellany of Orkney, Shetland, Caithness and Sutherland ...

Author: Alfred Wintle Johnston

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Caithness (Scotland)

Page:

View: 657

Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775

The People of the Northern Isles

Author: David Dobson

Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 98

View: 133

In 2005 Clearfield Company launched a new series of books by David Dobson that were designed to identify the origins of Scottish Highlanders who traveled to America prior to the Great Highland Migration that began in the 1730s and intensified thereafter. The first four volumes cover Scottish Highlanders from Argyll, Perthshire, Inverness, and the Northern Highlands. This fifth volume in the series pertains to the Northern Isles, commonly known as the Orkney Islands and the Shetland Islands.Much of the Highland emigration was directly related to a breakdown in social and economic institutions. Under the pressures of the commercial and industrial revolutions of the 17th and 18th centuries, Highland chieftains abandoned their patriarchal role in favor of becoming capitalist landlords. By raising farm rents to the breaking point, the chiefs left the social fabric of the Scottish Highlands in tatters. Accordingly, voluntary emigration by Gaelic-speaking Highlanders began in the 1730s. The social breakdown was intensified by the failure of the Jacobite cause in 1745, followed by the British military occupation and repression in the Highlands in the aftermath of the Battle of Culloden. In 1746, the British government dispatched about 1,000 Highland Jacobite prisoners of war to the colonies as indentured servants. Later, during the Seven Years CO War of 1756 Co1763, Highland regiments recruited in the service of the British crown chose to settle in Canada and America rather than return to Scotland.Once in North America, the Highlanders tended to be clannish and moved in extended family groups, unlike immigrants from the Lowlands who moved as individuals or in groups of a few families. The Gaelic-speaking Highlanders tended to settle on the North American frontier, whereas the Lowlanders merged with the English on the coast. Highlanders seem to have established C beachheads, C? and their kin subsequently followed. The best example of this pattern is in North Carolina where they first arrived in 1739 and moved to the Piedmont, to be followed by others for more than a century.Another factor that distinguishes research in Highland genealogy is the availability of pertinent records. Scottish genealogical research is generally based on the parish registers of the Church of Scotland, which provide information on baptisms and marriages. In the Scottish Lowlands, such records can date back to the mid-16th century, but Highland records generally start much later. Americans seeking their Highland roots face the problem that there are few, if any, church records available that pre-date the American Revolution. In the absence of Church of Scotland records, the researcher must turn to a miscellany of other records, such as court records, estate papers, sasines, gravestone inscriptions, burgess rolls, port books, services of heirs, wills and testaments, and especially rent rolls. (Some rent rolls even pre-date parish registers.) This series, therefore, is designed to identify the kinds of records that are available in the absence of parish registers and to supplement the church registers when they are available.The Northern Isles were once isolated on the northwest fringes of Europe; however, as trans-Atlantic trade expanded, they found themselves astride a major sea route between North America and northern Europe. Stromness in the Orkneys became the first or last port of call for many vessels crossing the Atlantic; for example, the vessels of the Hudson Bay Company from the late 17th-century traveled from Stromness to North America. For most Orkney emigrants, the motivating factors were poverty and lack of opportunity. Also noteworthy is that, unlike the other Highlanders, the Northern Islanders were of Scandinavian, not Celtic, origin (with an element of Lowland Scots). While this volume is not a comprehensive directory of all the Orkney and Shetland Islander emigrants during"

A Vertebrate Fauna of the Orkney Islands

Author: Thomas E. Buckley

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Orkney (Scotland)

Page: 314

View: 440

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