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Out of the Silent Planet

Author: C.S. Lewis

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 158

View: 712

Dr. Ransom is abducted to the eerie red planet, Malacandra, where his escape and flight endanger both his life and his chances of ever returing to Earth

C. S. Lewis in Context

Author: Doris T. Myers

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 234

C. S. Lewis in Context approaches Lewis' fiction through the linguistic controversies of his day, & develops a framework within which to evaluate his works & clarify his literary contributions. This valuable study will appeal to literary & linguistic scholars as well as to general enthusiasts of Lewis' fiction.

Planet Narnia

The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis

Author: Michael Ward

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 384

View: 308

For over half a century, scholars have laboured to show that C. S. Lewis's famed but apparently disorganised Chronicles of Narnia have an underlying symbolic coherence, pointing to such possible unifying themes as the seven sacraments, the seven deadly sins, and the seven books of Spenser's Faerie Queene. None of these explanations has won general acceptance and the structure of Narnia's symbolism has remained a mystery. Michael Ward has finally solved the enigma. In Planet Narnia he demonstrates that medieval cosmology, a subject which fascinated Lewis throughout his life, provides the imaginative key to the seven novels. Drawing on the whole range of Lewis's writings (including previously unpublished drafts of the Chronicles), Ward reveals how the Narnia stories were designed to express the characteristics of the seven medieval planets - - Jupiter, Mars, Sol, Luna, Mercury, Venus, and Saturn - - planets which Lewis described as "spiritual symbols of permanent value" and "especially worthwhile in our own generation". Using these seven symbols, Lewis secretly constructed the Chronicles so that in each book the plot-line, the ornamental details, and, most important, the portrayal of the Christ-figure of Aslan, all serve to communicate the governing planetary personality. The cosmological theme of each Chronicle is what Lewis called 'the kappa element in romance', the atmospheric essence of a story, everywhere present but nowhere explicit. The reader inhabits this atmosphere and thus imaginatively gains conna?tre knowledge of the spiritual character which the tale was created to embody. Planet Narnia is a ground-breaking study that will provoke a major revaluation not only of the Chronicles, but of Lewis's whole literary and theological outlook. Ward uncovers a much subtler writer and thinker than has previously been recognized, whose central interests were hiddenness, immanence, and knowledge by acquaintance.

C.S. Lewis: Fantasist, mythmaker, and poet

Author: Bruce L. Edwards

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 352

View: 361

The A-Z of C. S. Lewis

An Encyclopaedia of His Life, Thought, and Writings

Author: Colin Duriez

Publisher: Lion Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 352

View: 111

C S Lewis is widely known worldwide, but often enthusiasts are only aware of one part of his work - his children's stories, perhaps, but not his science fiction, or his literary criticism; his popular theology but not his work for the BBC during the Second World War. This volume brings together all aspects of C S Lewis's life and thought. Arranged in alphabetical order, it goes from The abolition of man - a book Lewis wrote in 1943 and described as 'almost my favourite' to Wormwood, a character in The Screwtape Letters. This book will delight anyone who is interested in C S Lewis and wants to learn more about him, his thought, his works and his life.

The Scientifiction Novels of C.S. Lewis

Space and Time in the Ransom Stories

Author: Jared Lobdell

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 274

Used by C.S. Lewis himself, the term “scientifiction” is revived here as it once encompassed not only what we call science fiction, but also that indeterminate field of the 1940s and 1950s sometimes referred to as science fantasy (leading up to Ray Bradbury), along with a portion of that great realm that has come, since the advent of The Lord of the Rings, to be called fantasy. Rather as an eighteenth-century novel may pre-date the divide between novel and romance, so C.S. Lewis’s “interplanetary” novels may be considered to pre-date the modern divide between fantasy and science fiction and thus be thought of as “scientifictional” in nature. The stories dealt with are those in which Elwin Ransom is a character, the three usually called the “space trilogy”: Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength—and the time-fragment entitled The Dark Tower. Lengthy chapters are devoted to each of the four Ransom stories. The book presents a study of Lewis, the nature of science fiction, the nature of Lewis’s “Arcadian” science fiction and his (and its) place in English literary history.

The Gift of Grace

The Future of Lutheran Theology

Author: Niels Henrik Gregersen

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 426

This landmark volume, the first of two, assesses the prospects and promise of Lutheran theology at the opening of a new millennium. From four continents, the thirty noted and respected contributors not only gauge how such classic themes as grace, the cross, and justification wear today but also look to key issues of ecumenism, social justice, global religious life, and the impact of contemporary science on Christian belief.

C. S. Lewis and a Problem of Evil

An Investigation of a Pervasive Theme

Author: Jerry Root

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 308

View: 264

C. S. Lewis was concerned about an aspect of the problem of evil he called subjectivism: the tendency of one's perspective to move towards self-referentialism and utilitarianism. In C. S. Lewis and a Problem of Evil, Jerry Root provides a holistic reading of Lewis by walking the reader through all of Lewis's published work as he argues Lewis's case against subjectivism. Furthermore, the book reveals that Lewis consistently employed fiction to make his case, as virtually all of his villains are portrayed as subjectivists. Lewis's warnings are prophetic; this book is not merely an exposition of Lewis, it is also a timely investigation into the problem of evil.

Planets in Peril

A Critical Study of C. S. Lewis's Ransom Trilogy

Author: David C. Downing

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 501

A critical study of C.S. Lewis's Ransom Trilogy which analyses Lewis's methods and meanings, concentrating on this trilogy but also including relevant secondary work. The study is developed through specific internal analysis of the three texts but also by the incorporation of details of Lewis's life. Lewis's literary scholarship and reasoned defence of Christian values incorporated into a network of analogies, echoes, and correspondences within the trilogy are also examined.

Word and Story in C. S. Lewis

Language and Narrative in Theory and Practice

Author: Peter J. Schakel

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 330

View: 873

Word and Story has broken new ground by enlisting well-known scholars in the examination of Lewis's ideas about language and narrative, both as stated in theory and as exemplified in practice. Never before has such clear, significant, and thorough work in these areas been brought together in one place. This compilation of sixteen essays demonstrates how an awareness of Lewis's ideas about language and narrative is essential to a full understanding and appreciation of his thought and works. The contributors examine Lewis's poetry, The Dark Woods, Studies in Words, and other works that have so far received little attention, in addition to more familiar parts of the Lewis canon. By approaching Lewis primarily as an artist and theorist, not just a Christian apologist, these essays offer new insights into his creative imagination, critical acumen, and his craftsmanship as a writer. One comes away from this book with a fresh vision and with heightened expectation, eager to return to Lewis's works.

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