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Shades of Earth

Author: Beth Revis

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 384

View: 577

Shades of Earth is the final novel in the teenage romantic science fiction trilogy, from New York Times bestseller Beth Revis, author of Across the Universe and A Million Suns. Perfect for all fans of The Hunger Games. Across the Universe was longlisted for the prestigous Carnegie Medal. Amy and Elder have finally left the oppressive walls of the spaceship Godspeed behind. They're ready to start life afresh--to build a home--on Centauri-Earth, the planet that Amy has traveled 25 trillion miles across the universe to experience. But this new Earth isn't the paradise that Amy had been hoping for. Amy and Elder must race to uncover who--or what--else is out there if they are to have any hope of saving their struggling colony and building a future together. But each new discovery brings more danger. And if their colony collapses then everything they have sacrificed--friends, family, life on Earth--will have been meaningless . . . Praise for the Across the Universe trilogy: 'A murder mystery, a budding romance and a dystopian world gracefully integrated into a sci-fi novel that blows away all expectation' - Melissa Marr, New York Times bestselling author of Wicked Lovely 'Revis has penned a fast-paced, action-packed follow-up with her dystopian, sci-fi thriller, A Million Suns, that explores not only the nature of authority and loyalty but fear of the unknown and fulfilling one's personal destiny.' - LA Times 'A riveting thriller about space travel, secrets, murder, and Realpolitik.'- Kirkus, Kirkus starred review Beth Revis, the New York Times bestselling US author of teenage novels Across the Universe and A Million Suns. She wrote her first books whilst still at university, where she secretly jotted down stories instead of taking notes. Beth lives in rural North Carolina with her husband and her dog, where she splits her time between writing lesson plans, writing stories, and writing up plans to travel somewhere new. bethrevis.blogspot.ca www.acrosstheuniversebook.com @bethrevis

Far From the Madding Crowd

Author: Thomas Hardy

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 496

View: 599

With an essay by Ronald Blythe. 'I cannot allow any man to - to criticise my private conduct!' she exclaimed. 'Nor will I for a minute.' Hardy's powerful novel of swift sexual passion and slow-burning loyalty centres on Bathsheba Everdene, a proud working woman whose life is complicated by three different men - respectable farmer Boldwood, seductive Sergeant Troy and devoted Gabriel - making her the object of scandal and betrayal. Vividly portraying the superstitions and traditions of a small rural community, Far from the Madding Crowd shows the precarious position of a woman in a man's world. The Penguin English Library - 100 editions of the best fiction in English, from the eighteenth century and the very first novels to the beginning of the First World War.

Ascension Through Orbs

Author: Diana Cooper

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 240

View: 778

Featuring a wealth of additional material, this book explains the meaning and the importance of orbs--the physical presence of angels found in digital photographs--in a wider and more advanced context. With nearly 50 photographic examples accompanied by meditations to allow the energy of the orbs to be more fully absorbed, this advanced tool for ascension explores spirit guides and the angelic hierarchy in greater depth, including the powers, the chakras, the archangels, the Lords of Karma, and the Ascension Masters.

Brown County in Shades of the Earth

Author: Ann Klein

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Brown County (Ind.)

Page:

View: 305

Shades of Freedom:Racial Politics and Presumptions of the American Legal Process Race and the American Legal Process, Volume II

Racial Politics and Presumptions of the American Legal Process Race and the American Legal Process

Author: A. Leon Higginbotham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 351

Few individuals have had as great an impact on the law--both its practice and its history--as A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. A winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, he has distinguished himself over the decades both as a professor at Yale, the University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard, and as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals. But Judge Higginbotham is perhaps best known as an authority on racism in America: not the least important achievement of his long career has been In the Matter of Color, the first volume in a monumental history of race and the American legal process. Published in 1978, this brilliant book has been hailed as the definitive account of racism, slavery, and the law in colonial America.Now, after twenty years, comes the long-awaited sequel. In Shades of Freedom, Higginbotham provides a magisterial account of the interaction between the law and racial oppression in America from colonial times to the present, demonstrating how the one agent that should have guaranteed equal treatment before the law--the judicial system--instead played a dominant role in enforcing the inferior position of blacks. The issue of racial inferiority is central to this volume, as Higginbotham documents how early white perceptions of black inferiority slowly became codified into law. Perhaps the most powerful and insightful writing centers on a pair of famous Supreme Court cases, which Higginbotham uses to portray race relations at two vital moments in our history. The Dred Scott decision of 1857 declared that a slave who had escaped to free territory must be returned to his slave owner. Chief Justice Roger Taney, in his notorious opinion for the majority, stated that blacks were "so inferior that they had no right which the white man was bound to respect." For Higginbotham, Taney's decision reflects the extreme state that race relations had reached just before the Civil War. And after the War and Reconstruction, Higginbotham reveals, the Courts showed a pervasive reluctance (if not hostility) toward the goal of full and equal justice for African Americans, and this was particularly true of the Supreme Court. And in the Plessy v. Ferguson decision, which Higginbotham terms "one of the most catastrophic racial decisions ever rendered," the Court held that full equality--in schooling or housing, for instance--was unnecessary as long as there were "separate but equal" facilities. Higginbotham also documents the eloquent voices that opposed the openly racist workings of the judicial system, from Reconstruction Congressman John R. Lynch to Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan to W. E. B. Du Bois, and he shows that, ironically, it was the conservative Supreme Court of the 1930s that began the attack on school segregation, and overturned the convictions of African Americans in the famous Scottsboro case. But today racial bias still dominates the nation, Higginbotham concludes, as he shows how in six recent court cases the public perception of black inferiority continues to persist.In Shades of Freedom, a noted scholar and celebrated jurist offers a work of magnificent scope, insight, and passion. Ranging from the earliest colonial times to the present, it is a superb work of history--and a mirror to the American soul.

Romantic Shades and Shadows

Author: Susan J. Wolfson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 450

"Romantic Shades and Shadows is, at heart, a book about literary allusion. Each poem, book, or play that one encounters is imbued with verbal textures, turns of phrase, and ideas and things that summon the specter of older literary bodies. The poetry of Wordsworth and Coleridge, for example, is haunted by the writings of Shakespeare and Milton. In tracing ghostly patterns to find literary and contextual linkages, Susan J. Wolfson explores the shifting boundaries that separate one literary time period from another, and teaches her readers how best to conduct close readings of Romantic texts" --

Earth Architecture

Author: Ronald Rael

Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 208

View: 705

Provides a history of building with earth in the modern era, focusing on projects constructed in the last few decades that use rammed earth, mud brick, compressed earth, cob, and several other techniques made more relevant than ever by ecological and economic imperatives. Features over 40 projects.

Earth in Shades

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 14

View: 704

Shades of Truth

Author: J. K. Scott

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 296

View: 789

It's the year 2011. According to the Mayan calendar, December 21, 2012, is the date for the end of civilization on Earth. And with the world in political and environmental crisis due to terrorism, war, and natural catastrophes, that date of doom seems more and more plausible. Trend analyst Tyler Moore has already had a taste of earthly devastation from the Southern California earthquake of 2010 that forced him to relocate his company to Arizona. But when his old college roommate, the current U.S. vice president, asks for his help in analyzing the credibility of the Mayan date, Tyler begins to realize just how fragile a grip humanity has on the world. With the help of ancient-civilizations enthusiast Kate Ryan, Tyler plunges into a terrifying reality involving cataclysmic prophecies and international panic-a reality that could quite literally mean the end of the human race. www.authorjkscott.com

Shades of the Planet

American Literature as World Literature

Author: Wai-chee Dimock

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 446

In a globalizing age, studying American literature in isolation from the rest of the world seems less and less justified. But is the conceptual box of the nation dispensable? And what would American literature look like without it?Leading scholars take up this debate in Shades of the Planet, beginning not with the United States as center, but with the world as circumference. This reversed frame yields a surprising landscape, alive with traces of West Africa, Eastern Europe, Iran, Iraq, India, China, Mexico, and Australia. The Broadway musical Oklahoma! has aboriginal antecedents; Black English houses an African syntax; American slavery consorts with the Holocaust; Philip Roth keeps company with Milan Kundera; the crime novel moves south of the border; and R. P. Blackmur lectures in Japan. A national literature becomes haunted by the world when that literature is seen extending to the Pacific, opening up to Islam, and accompanying African-American authors as they travel. Highlighting American literature as a fold in a planet-wide fabric, this pioneering volume transforms the field, redrawing its institutional as well as geographical map.The contributors are Rachel Adams, Jonathan Arac, Homi K. Bhabha, Lawrence Buell, Wai Chee Dimock, Susan Stanford Friedman, Paul Giles, David Palumbo-Liu, Ross Posnock, Joseph Roach, and Eric J. Sundquist.

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