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The Death of Stalin

Author: Fabien Nury

Publisher: Titan Comics

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 122

View: 473

The graphic novel that inspired the new Armando Iannucci movie which includes an all-star cast – Steve Buscemi, Simon Russell Beale, Jason Isaacs, Michael Palin, and Jeffrey Tambor. Fear, corruption and treachery abound in this political satire set in the aftermath of Stalin's death in the Soviet Union in 1953. When the leader of the Soviet Union, Joseph Stalin, has a stroke - the political gears begin to turn, plunging the super-state into darkness, uncertainty and near civil war. The struggle for supreme power will determine the fate of the nation and of the world. And it all really happened. A darkly comic tale about the power vacuum left behind by Stalin's death. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Calibri} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Calibri; min-height: 14.0px}

The Death of Stalin

Author: Armando Iannucci

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Motion picture plays

Page: 157

View: 407

Cinema and Soviet Society

From the Revolution to the Death of Stalin

Author: Peter Kenez

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 252

View: 128

In this updated edition of his classic text, Kenez covers the roots of Soviet cinema in the film heritage of pre-Revolutionary Russia, tracing the changes generated by the Revolution of 1917.

The Death of Stalin

Author: pseud Monitor

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Soviet Union

Page: 144

View: 301

The Voices of the Dead

Stalin's Great Terror in the 1930s

Author: Hiroaki Kuromiya

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 619

Swept up in the maelstrom of Stalin’s Great Terror of 1937-1938, nearly a million people died. Most were ordinary citizens who left no records and as a result have been completely forgotten. This book is the first to attempt to retrieve their stories and reconstruct their lives, drawing upon recently declassified archives of the former Soviet Secret Police in Kiev. Hiroaki Kuromiya uncovers in the archives the hushed voices of the condemned, and he chronicles the lives of dozens of individuals who shared the same dehumanizing fate: all were falsely arrested, executed, and dumped in mass graves. Kuromiya investigates the truth behind the fabricated records, filling in at least some of the details of the lives and deaths of ballerinas, priests, beggars, teachers, peasants, workers, soldiers, pensioners, homemakers, fugitives, peddlers, ethnic Russians, Ukrainians, Poles, Germans, Koreans, Jews, and others. In recounting the extraordinary stories gleaned from the secret files, Kuromiya not only commemorates the dead and forgotten but also proposes a new interpretation of Soviet society that provides useful insights into the enigma of Stalinist terror.

Sino-Soviet Relations Since the Death of Stalin

Author: Peter Mayer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Soviet Union

Page: 293

View: 193

The Death of Stalin

Selected Early Poems, 1978-1989

Author: Ivan Argüelles

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 183

View: 202

Poetry. "Ivan Argüelles is one of this century's finest, yet he remains known to only a few passionate partisans. His work is 'difficult,' but it is no more difficult than the work of many far better-known poets—and his work is better than theirs. Argüelles is wide-ranging, restless, full of 'references'—the author's learning is immense—but also, immediate, astonishing, visceral; his work communicates before it is fully, or, indeed sometimes even partially, 'understood'"—Jack Foley.

Cinema and Soviet Society from the Revolution to the Death of Stalin

Author: Peter Kenez

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Motion pictures

Page: 252

View: 624

Stalin's Agent

The Life and Death of Alexander Orlov

Author: Boris Volodarsky

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 832

View: 515

This is the history of an unprecedented deception operation - the biggest KGB deception of all time. It has never been told in full until now. There are almost certainly people who would like it never to be told. It is the story of General Alexander Orlov. Stalin's most loyal and trusted henchman during the Spanish Civil War, Orlov was also the Soviet handler controlling Kim Philby, the British spy, defector, and member of the notorious 'Cambridge Five'. Escaping Stalin's purges, Orlov fled to America in the late 1930s and lived underground. He only dared reveal his identity to the world after Stalin's death, in his 1953 best-seller The Secret History of Stalin's Crimes, after which he became perhaps the best known of all Soviet defectors, much written about, highly praised, and commemorated by the US Congress on his death in 1973. But there is a twist in the Orlov story beyond the dreams of even the most ingenious spy novelist: 'General Alexander Orlov' never actually existed. The man known as 'Orlov' was in fact born Leiba Feldbin. And while he was a loyal servant of Stalin and the controller of Philby, he was never a General in the KGB, never truly defected to the West after his 'flight' from the USSR, and remained a loyal Soviet agent until his death. The 'Orlov' story as it has been accepted until now was largely the invention of the KGB - and one perpetuated long after the end of the Cold War. In this meticulous new biography, Boris Volodarsky, himself a former Soviet intelligence officer, now tells the true story behind 'Orlov' for the first time. An intriguing tale of Russian espionage and deception, stretching from the time of Lenin to the Putin era, it is a story that many people in the world's intelligence agencies would almost definitely prefer you not to know about.

The Last Days of Stalin

Author: Joshua Rubenstein

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 276

Joshua Rubenstein’s riveting account takes us back to the second half of 1952 when no one could foresee an end to Joseph Stalin’s murderous regime. He was poised to challenge the newly elected U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower with armed force, and was also broadening a vicious campaign against Soviet Jews. Stalin’s sudden collapse and death in March 1953 was as dramatic and mysterious as his life. It is no overstatement to say that his passing marked a major turning point in the twentieth century. The Last Days of Stalin is an engaging, briskly told account of the dictator’s final active months, the vigil at his deathbed, and the unfolding of Soviet and international events in the months after his death. Rubenstein throws fresh light on the devious plotting of Beria, Malenkov, Khrushchev, and other “comrades in arms” who well understood the significance of the dictator’s impending death; the witness-documented events of his death as compared to official published versions; Stalin’s rumored plans to forcibly exile Soviet Jews; the responses of Eisenhower and Secretary of State Dulles to the Kremlin’s conciliatory gestures after Stalin’s death; and the momentous repercussions when Stalin’s regime of terror was cut short.

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