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The Economics of Forest Disturbances

Wildfires, Storms, and Invasive Species

Author: Thomas P. Holmes

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 420

View: 418

by Peter J. Roussopoulos, Director, Southern Research Station The world and its ecosystems are repeatedly punctuated by natural disturbances, and human societies must learn to manage this reality Often severe and unp- dictable, dynamic natural forces disrupt human welfare and alter the structure and composition of natural systems Over the past century, land management ag- cies within the United States have relied on science to improve the sustainable management of natural resources Forest economics research can help advance this scientifc basis by integrating knowledge of forest disturbance processes with their economic causes and consequences As the twenty-frst century unfolds, people increasingly seek the goods and services provided by forest ecosystems, not only for wood supply, clean water, and leisure pursuits, but also to establish residential communities that are removed from the hustle and bustle of urban life As vividly demonstrated during the past few years, Santa Ana winds can blow wildfres down from the mountains of California, incinerating homes as readily as vegetation in the canyons below Hurricanes can fatten large swaths of forest land, while associated foods create havoc for urban and rural residents alike Less dramatic, but more insidious, trees and forest stands are succumbing to exotic insects and diseases, causing economic losses to private property values (including timber) as well as scenic and recreation values As human demands on public and private forests expand, science-based solutions need to be identifed so that social needs can be balanced with the vagaries of forest disturbance processes

Fire Social Science Research

Selected Highlights

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forest fires

Page: 65

View: 989

General Technical Report PNW-GTR

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forests and forestry

Page:

View: 932

Handbook of Forest Resource Economics

Author: Shashi Kant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 560

View: 910

It is increasingly recognized that the economic value of forests is not merely the production of timber. Forests provide other key ecosystem services, such as being sinks for greenhouse gases, hotspots of biodiversity, tourism and recreation. They are also vitally important in preventing soil erosion and controlling water supplies, as well as providing non-timber forest products and supporting the livelihoods of many local people. This handbook provides a detailed, comprehensive and broad coverage of forest economics, including traditional forest economics of timber production, economics of environmental role of forests, and recent developments in forest economics. The chapters are grouped into six parts: fundamental topics in forest resource economics; economics of forest ecosystems; economics of forests, climate change, and bioenergy; economics of risk, uncertainty, and natural disturbances; economics of forest property rights and certification; and emerging issues and developments. Written by leading environmental, forest, and natural resource economists, the book represents a definitive reference volume for students of economics, environment, forestry and natural resource economics and management.

The Economics of Salvage Harvesting and Reforestation in British Columbia's Mountain Pine Beetle-affected Forests

Author: Brian Peter

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forest management

Page: 29

View: 890

In stands with significant mountain pine beetle (MPB) mortality, forest managers face a range of choices including clearcut harvesting, partial cutting, various rehabilitation strategies, and non-intervention. These choices involve many long-term costs, benefits, and risks, some of which can be assessed through economic analysis. After reviewing the context for this issue, the authors provided case studies that span the more likely stand-level problems faced by decision makers. All analyses were conducted from the perspective of the landowner (i.e., government) rather than the user of the resource (i.e., licensee). The insights from the case studies form a basis to answer the following core questions: Are some stand types better left unsalvaged? What economic/silvicultural assumptions produce higher stand values when salvaging is foregone? In areas that cannot be salvaged, is reforestation a profitable investment? Finally, does partial cutting make sense economically?--Document.

Economic Ecosystem Indicators in Declining Forest Health

Author: Daniel J. Golden

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forest health

Page: 39

View: 903

Emulating Natural Forest Landscape Disturbances

Concepts and Applications : Popular Summaries : an International Science Symposium, May 11-16, 2002

Author: Ontario Forest Research Institute

Publisher: Sault Ste. Marie : Ontario Forest Research Institute

ISBN:

Category: Ecological disturbances

Page: 100

View: 517

This publication is a compendium of summaries of presentations from a symposium that discussed the concepts, challenges, and potential consequences of implementing emulation of natural forest landscape disturbances at the landscape level in forest management. The first set of presentations covers such topics as predicting natural forest disturbances, predicting fire regimes and forest insect disturbance regimes, silvicultural concepts, the ecological basis for emulation, boreal forest management, and the economics of emulation forestry. The second set presents case studies from across northern & central North America to illustrate some practical applications of the concepts behind emulation of natural forest landscape disturbances.

The Year in Ecology and Conservation Biology

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Category: Conservation biology

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View: 116

Publications of the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station

Author: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)

Publisher:

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Category: Forests and forestry

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View: 275

Markets for Forest Products Following a Large Disturbance

Opportunities and Challenges from the Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak in Western Canada

Author: Bryan Edward Cooper Bogdanski

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forest products industry

Page: 68

View: 707

This paper describes recent wood market trends and highlights market opportunities and limitations for MPB-killed lodgepole pine.

Economics and Diversity of Trees and Landscape in Northern Hardwood Forests

Implications of Deterministic and Stochastic Models

Author: Ching-Rong Lin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 308

View: 195

An Environmental and Economic Assessment of Forest Management Options

A Case Study in Malaysia

Author: Kanta Kumari

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forest management

Page: 49

View: 951

Tropical Rain Forest

Disturbance and Recovery : Proceedings of a Royal Society Discussion Meeting, Held on 18 and 19 September 1991

Author: Royal Society (Great Britain). Discussion Meeting

Publisher: Scholium International

ISBN:

Category: Ecology

Page: 133

View: 470

Reports some of the results to date of a major interdisciplinary programme of rain forest research and training by British and South-east Asian scientists on The recovery of tropical forests following disturbance: patterns and processes.

Economics of Tropical Forest Management

Uncertainty, Irreversibility. and Spatial Relationships

Author: Heidi Joanne Albers

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forest management

Page: 412

View: 168

The Economics of Biodiversity Conservation in Sub-Saharan Africa

Mending the Ark

Author: Charles Perrings

Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 351

View: 137

Reporting on a research project, environmental economists, most from York University, offer case studies of the economic causes of biodiversity loss in a range of ecosystems, including wetlands, montane forests, tropical moist forests, semi-arid savannas, and lakes, discussing the policy options for conserving biodiversity in each case. They also analyze in detail the environmental consequences of policy reform in Ghana on the large and small scale, and present practical recommendations for implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity. Among the other areas they consider are the Hadejiia-Nguru wetlands of northern Nigeria, Nyae Nyae in Namibia, the Marsabit Forest Reserve, and demersal and gillnet fisheries in Malawi. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Canadian Journal of Forest Research

Author:

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Category: Forests and forestry

Page:

View: 903

Conservation Sciences

The Magazine of Manomet Observatory

Author:

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ISBN:

Category: Birds

Page:

View: 976

The Forestry chronicle

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Forests and forestry

Page:

View: 277

Wilderness and Natural Areas in the Eastern United States

A Management Challenge

Author: David L. Kulhavy

Publisher: School of Forestry

ISBN:

Category: Natural areas

Page: 416

View: 649

Economic Benefits of Managing Forestry and Tourism at Nimmo Bay

A Public Perception Study and Economic Analysis

Author: British Columbia. Economics and Trade Branch

Publisher: University of British Columbia Press

ISBN:

Category: Forest landscape management

Page: 59

View: 539

This study was undertaken to address the challenge of optimizing the overall benefits of forest landscapes to both the forestry & tourism industries in British Columbia. Nimmo Bay Lodge was chosen for the study because it had a defined viewshed with merchantable wood, planned timber harvesting activities in the viewshed, and clients willing to be surveyed. A visual perception survey was administered to 96 lodge patrons to determine visitor response to various visual quality scenes & silvicultural systems such as partial retention and clear-cutting. The survey sought to determine the proportion of clients who would return to the lodge. Next, the viewshed for the lodge was defined to establish a land base for benefit analysis purposes, and an annual timber flow was derived for the area. The benefit analysis looked at several scenarios ranging from no harvesting to maximum harvest in four economic areas: resource value, business revenue, government revenue, and employment & income. Includes glossary.

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