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The External Evidence for Interpolation in Homer

Author: George Melville Bolling

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Epic poetry, Greek

Page: 259

View: 365

External Evidence for Interpolation in Homer

Author: J. T. Sheppard

Publisher:

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Category:

Page: 3

View: 674

The External Evidence for Interpolation in Homer

Author: George Melville Bolling (Philologue).)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 259

View: 455

The External Evidence for Interpolation in Homer. By George Melville Bolling. New York: Oxford University Press, American Branch, 1925

Author: Paul Shorey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 2

View: 860

The Iliad: A Commentary: Volume 4, Books 13-16

Author: Richard Janko

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 584

This, the fourth volume in the six-volume Commentary on The Iliad being prepared under the General Editorship of Professor G. S. Kirk, covers Books 13-16, including the Battle for the Ships, the Deception of Zeus and the Death of Patroklos. Three introductory essays discuss the role of Homer's gods in his poetry; the origins and development of the epic diction; and the transmission of the text, from the bard's lips to our own manuscripts. It is now widely recognised that the first masterpiece of Western literature is an oral poem; Professor Janko's detailed commentary aims to show how this recognition can clarify many linguistic and textual problems, entailing a radical reassessment of the work of Homer's Alexandrian editors. The commentary also explores the poet's subtle creativity in adapting traditional materials, whether formulae, typical scenes, mythology or imagery, so as best to move, inspire and entertain his audience, ancient and modern alike. Discussion of the poem's literary qualities and structure is, where possible, kept separate from that of more technical matters.

The Iliad: A Commentary

Author: Mark W. Edwards

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Greek poetry

Page: 356

View: 851

A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey: Introduction and Books I-VIII

Author: Alfred Heubeck

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 408

View: 217

These are the first two of a three-volume commentary on the Odyssey, compiled by an international team of scholars, making the most up-to-date and authoritative scholarship available in paperback. Questions of text, dialect, the poems relation to the Iliad, and the epic tradition in general are discussed by acknowledged experts in the field.

The Manuscript Evidence for Interpolation in Homer

Author: M. J. Apthorp

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Manuscripts, Greek

Page: 230

View: 380

Books 9 - 12

3

Author: Bryan Hainsworth

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Greek poetry

Page: 380

View: 363

This is the third volume in the major six-volume Commentary on Homer's Iliad prepared under the General Editorship of Professor G.S. Kirk. It opens with two introductory chapters: the first on Homeric diction (on which emphasis is maintained throughout the Commentary); the second on the contributions that comparative studies have made to seeing the Homeric epics in sharper perspective. In the commentary Dr Hainsworth confronts in an intentionally even-handed manner the serious problems posed by the ninth, tenth and twelfth books of The Iliad, seeking by means of a succinct discussion and a brief bibliography of recent contributions to furnish the user with a point of entry into the often voluminous scholarship devoted to these questions. The Greek text is not included.

Homer and Early Greek Epic

Collected Essays

Author: Margalit Finkelberg

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 418

View: 420

This collection includes thirty scholarly essays on Homer and Greek epic poetry published by Margalit Finkelberg over the past three decades. The topics discussed reflect the author’s research interests and represent the main directions of her contribution to Homeric studies: Homer's language and diction, archaic Greek epic tradition, Homer's world and values, transmission and reception of the Homeric poems. The book gives special emphasis to some of the central issues in contemporary Homeric scholarship, such as oral-formulaic theory and the role of the individual poet; Neoanalysis and the character of the relationship between Homer and the tradition about the Trojan War; the multi-layered texture of the Homeric poems; the Homeric Question; the canonic status of the Iliad and the Odyssey in antiquity and modernity. All the articles are revised and updated. The book addresses both scholars and advanced students of Classics, as well as non-specialists interested in the Homeric poems and their journey through centuries.

The Iliad: A Commentary: Volume 6, Books 21-24

Author: G. S. Kirk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 519

The sixth and final volume of this major Commentary on Homer's Iliad. The introduction discusses the structure and main themes of the poem, its relationship to the Odyssey, and its interpretation in antiquity.

Homer and His Critics

Author: John Myres

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 545

Here is presented a succinct and insightful account of the reception of the Iliad and Odyssey from antiquity to the mid-twentieth century. The overall result is less a systematic history than a series of independent studies differing in scale and focus, the chapter on Gladstone being the most comprehensive and detailed. First published in 1958. The author gives greatest attention to those who made active use of Homer rather than passive, even if admiring, readers: Virgil because he wrote the Aeneid, Gladstone because he brought him to prominence in Oxford education, Wood because he sought out the geography and Schliemann because he dug for the kings. The emphasis is thus placed less on the purely academic critic than on the traveller and the innovative amateur. A valuable contribution to a subject of perennial fascination, this will be of interest to all students and teachers of the classics.

The Iliad: A Commentary: Volume 2

Author: G. S. Kirk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 101

This is the second volume in the major six-volume commentary on The Iliad now being prepared under the general editorship of Professor Kirk. Volume I was published in 1985. As before the volume consists of four introductory essays followed by the commentary itself. The Greek text is not included. This project is the first large-scale commentary on The Iliad for nearly 100 years, and takes special account of language, style and thematic structure as well as of the complex social and cultural background to the work.

The Odyssey

(The Stephen Mitchell Translation)

Author: Homer

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 432

View: 166

A brilliant new version of the Odyssey from one of the most accomplished translators of our time. “Sing to me, Muse . . .” It has been said that a myth is a story about the way things never were but always are. The Odyssey is the original hero’s journey, an epic voyage into the unknown, and has inspired other creative work for millennia—from ancient poetry to contemporary fiction and films. With its consummately modern hero, full of guile and wit, always prepared to reinvent himself in order to realize his heart’s desire—to return to home and family after ten years of war—the Odyssey now speaks to us again across 2,600 years. In words of great poetic power, Stephen Mitchell’s translation brings Odysseus and his adventures vividly to life as never before. Full of imagination and light, beauty and humor, this Odyssey carries you along in a fast stream of action and imagery. One-eyed maneating giants; irresistibly seductive sirens; shipwrecks and narrow escapes; princesses and monsters; ghosts sipping blood at the Underworld’s portal, desperate for a chance to speak to the living; and the final destruction of all Odysseus’s enemies in the banquet hall—these stories are still spellbinding today. So, too, are the intimate moments of storytelling by the fire, of homecoming and reunion, fidelity and love—all of greater value to Odysseus, and to us, than the promise of immortality. Just as Mitchell “re-energised the Iliad for a new generation” (The Sunday Telegraph), his Odyssey is the noblest, clearest, and most captivating rendition of one of the defining masterpieces of Western literature. Mitchell’s muscular language keeps the diction close to spoken English, yet its rhythms re-create the oceanic surge of the ancient Greek. The first translation to benefit from modern advances in textual scholarship, Mitchell’s Odyssey also includes an illuminating introductory essay that opens the epic still further to our understanding and appreciation and textual notes that will benefit all readers. Beautiful, musical, accurate, and alive, this new Odyssey is a story for our time as well as for the ages.

Who is Buried in Chaucer's Tomb?

Studies in the Reception of Chaucer's Book

Author: Joseph A. Dane

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 350

View: 466

Joseph A. Dane examines the history of the books we now know as "Chaucer’s"—a history that includes printers and publishers, editors, antiquarians, librarians, and book collectors. The Chaucer at issue here is not a medieval poet, securely bound within his fourteenth-century context, but rather the product of the often chaotic history of the physical books that have been produced and marketed in his name. This history involves a series of myths about Chaucer—a reformist Chaucer, a realist Chaucer, a political and critical Chaucer who seems oddly like us. It also involves more self-reflective critical myths—the conveniently coherent editorial tradition that leads progressively to modern editions of Chaucer. Dane argues that the material background of these myths remains irreducibly and often amusingly recalcitrant. The great Chaucer monuments—his editions, his book, and even his tomb—defy our efforts to stabilize them with our critical descriptions and transcriptions. Part I concentrates on the production and reception of the Chaucerian book from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, a period dominated by the folio "Complete Works" and a period that culminates in what Chaucerians have consistently (if uncritically) defined as the worst Chaucer edition of 1721. Part II considers the increasing ambivalence of modern editors and critics in relation to the book of Chaucer, and the various attempts of modern scholars to provide alternative sources of authority.

Homer’s Iliad

Author: Martha Krieter-Spiro

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 212

The renowned Basler Homer-Kommentar of the Iliad, edited by Anton Bierl and Joachim Latacz and originally published in German, presents the latest developments in Homeric scholarship. Through the English translation of this ground-breaking reference work, edited by S. Douglas Olson, its valuable findings are now made accessible to students and scholars worldwide.

Studies in the Text and Transmission of the Iliad

Author: Martin L. West

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 339

In den jahrzehntelangen Vorarbeiten zu seiner weltweit so beachteten Homerausgabe hat der Editor viele interessante und zugleich neue Details zur Textüberlieferung gewonnen, die er nunmehr in einer Spezialmonographie zusammengefaßt hat. Somit wird der Homerforscher in die neusten Ergebnisse zu Textproblemen in Homers Ilias eingeführt; und bestimmte editorische Entscheidungen von West sind für den Fachmann klarer nachzuvollziehen.

The Making of the Odyssey

Author: Martin Litchfield West

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 315

View: 437

'The Making of the Odyssey' is a penetrating study of the background, composition, and artistry of the Homeric Odyssey, which places the poem in its late seventh-century context in relation to the 'Iliad' and other poetry of the time.

The Iliad

(The Stephen Mitchell Translation)

Author: Homer

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 544

View: 887

TOLSTOY CALLED THE ILIAD A miracle; Goethe said that it always thrust him into a state of astonishment. Homer’s story is thrilling, and his Greek is perhaps the most beautiful poetry ever sung or written. But until now, even the best English translations haven’t been able to re-create the energy and simplicity, the speed, grace, and pulsing rhythm of the original. In Stephen Mitchell’s Iliad, the epic story resounds again across 2,700 years, as if the lifeblood of its heroes Achilles and Patroclus, Hector and Priam flows in every word. And we are there with them, amid the horror and ecstasy of war, carried along by a poetry that lifts even the most devastating human events into the realm of the beautiful. Mitchell’s Iliad is the first translation based on the work of the preeminent Homeric scholar Martin L. West, whose edition of the original Greek identifies many passages that were added after the Iliad was first written down, to the detriment of the music and the story. Omitting these hundreds of interpolated lines restores a dramatically sharper, leaner text. In addition, Mitchell’s illuminating introduction opens the epic still further to our understanding and appreciation. Now, thanks to Stephen Mitchell’s scholarship and the power of his language, the Iliad’s ancient story comes to moving, vivid new life.

The Manuscript Evidence for Interpolation in Homer

Author: M. J. Apthorp

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Manuscripts, Greek

Page: 230

View: 766