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The Fiction of Occasion in Hellenistic and Roman Poetry

Author: Adrian Gramps

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 227

View: 189

The aim of this book is to devise a method for approaching the problem of presence in Hellenistic and Roman poetry. The problem of presence, as defined here, is the problem of the availability or accessibility to the reader of the fictional worlds disclosed by poetry. From Callimachus’ Hymns to the Odes of Horace, poets of this era repeatedly challenge readers by beckoning them to explore fictive spaces which are at once familiar and otherworldly, realms of the imagination which are nevertheless firmly rooted in the lived reality of the poets and their contemporaries. We too, when we read these poems, may feel simultaneously a sense of being transported to a world apart and of being seized upon by the poem’s address in the here and now of reading. The fiction of occasion is proposed as a new conceptual tool for understanding how these poems produce such problematic presences and what varieties of experience they make possible for their readers. The fiction of occasion is defined as a phenomenon whereby a poem is fictionally framed as part of a material event or ‘occasion’ with which the reader is invited to engage through the medium of the senses. The book explores this concept through close readings of key authors from the corpus of first-person poetry written in Greek and Latin between the 3rd century BCE and the 1st century CE, with a focus on Callimachus, Bion, Catullus, Propertius, and Horace. The ultimate purpose of these readings is to move towards developing a new vocabulary for conceptualising ancient poetry as an embodied experience.

Structures of Epic Poetry

Vol. I: Foundations. Vol. II.1/II.2: Configuration. Vol. III: Continuity

Author: Christiane Reitz

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 2756

View: 247

This compendium (4 vols.) studies the continuity, flexibility, and variation of structural elements in epic narratives. It provides an overview of the structural patterns of epic poetry by means of a standardized, stringent terminology. Both diachronic developments and changes within individual epics are scrutinized in order to provide a comprehensive structural approach and a key to intra- and intertextual characteristics of ancient epic poetry.

Propertius: A Hellenistic Poet on Love and Death

Author: Theodore D. Papanghelis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 379

The bond between love and death has long been recognised as a defining characteristic of the elegies of Propertius, but scholars have rarely clarified how or to what degree Propertius differed from other love poets in associating these themes. In this book, Dr Papanghelis traces the radical way in which Propertius dealt with amorous and morbid fantasies in his poems. He argues that the modes of erotic expression used in the elegies are fundamentally unconventional, to the point that the definitions of love and death are interdependent. This book offers a detailed reading of some of the most stimulating and problematic of Propertius' elegies, offering fresh insight on the question of the poet's sensuous temperament and the significance of the love-death relationship in his works.

The New Posidippus

A Hellenistic Poetry Book

Author: Posidippe de Pella

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 394

View: 198

The Milan Papyrus ( P. Mil. Volg. VIII. 309), containing a collection of epigrams apparently all by Posidippus of Pella, provides one of the most exciting new additions to the corpus of Greek literature in decades. It not only contains over 100 previously unknown epigrams by one of the most prominent poets of the third century BC, but as an artefact it constitutes our earliest example of a Greek poetry book. In addition to a poetic translation of the entire corpus of Posidippus'poetry, this volume contains essays about Posidippus by experts in the fields of papyrology, Hellenistic and Augustan literature, Ptolemaic history, and Graeco-Roman visual culture.

They Keep It All Hid

Augustan Poetry, its Antecedents and Reception

Author: Peter E. Knox

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 201

View: 888

This volume comprises a series of studies focusing on the Latin poetry of the first and second centuries BCE, its relationship to earlier models both Greek and Latin, and its reception by later writers. A point of particular focus is the influence of Greek poetry, including not only Hellenistic writers like Callimachus, Theocritus, and Lycophron, but also archaic poets like Pindar and Bacchylides. The volume also includes studies of style, as well as treatments of the influence of Latin poetry on writers like Marvell and Dylan. Contributers include J. N. Adams, Barbara Weiden Boyd, Brian Breed, Sergio Casali, Julia Hejduk, Peter Knox, Leah Kronenburg, Charles Martindale, Charles McNelis, James O’Hara, Thomas Palaima, Hayden Pelliccia, David Petrain, David Ross, and Alexander Sens.

Talking Books

Readings in Hellenistic and Roman Books of Poetry

Author: G. O. Hutchinson

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 332

View: 660

Doing things with books -- The Aetia: Callimachus' Poem of knowledge -- Hellenistic epic and Homeric form -- The new Posidippus and Latin poetry -- The Catullan corpus, Greek epigram, and the poetry of objects -- The publication and individuality of Horace's Odes Books 1-3 -- Horace and archaic Greek poetry -- Ovid, Amores 3: the book -- The metamorphosis of metamorphosis: p. Oxy. 4711 and Ovid -- Structuring instruction: didactic poetry and didactic prose -- Books and scales.

Statius and the Silvae

Poets, Patrons, and Epideixis in the Graeco-Roman World

Author: Alex Hardie

Publisher: Francis Cairns

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 385

Although writing in Latin, Statius (first-century AD) was, by origin and training, a Greek poet, and his collection of "occasional" poems, the Silvae, are a Roman extension of contemporary trends in Greek display poetry. No reading of the Silvae can be accurate without an understanding of this Graeco-Roman poetic milieu. This book therefore begins with a reconstruction of the professional background to the Silvae - the festival circuit, the conditions of work for writers, their opportunities for advancement in the Greek and Roman worlds - both in the Hellenistic period and in the first century A.D. In this setting, display oratory and poetry are shown to have developed in parallel and to have had a profound mutual influence. Further chapters consider Statius' performances as a Neapolitan poet at Rome, his portrayal of his own society and his friends, and his attitudes to his Latin predecessors. Literary patronage, both imperial and private, is a vital element in Statius' poetic career, and Hardie goes on to investigate the identity and social standing of the addressees of the Silvae . He also considers the career of the contemporary epigrammatist Martial in comparison to that of Statius. Many essential features of Flavian taste emerge from these studies. Large-scale interpretations of individual poems are offered throughout this volume, making many new suggestions about both points of detail and the overall significance of the major poems in the Silvae . Statius and the Silvae is an important contribution to the debate on the relationship between poetry and rhetoric, and to the understanding of how society and literature interconnected in the Flavian age.

Art and Rhetoric in Roman Culture

Author: Jaś Elsner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page:

View: 992

Rhetoric was fundamental to education and to cultural aspiration in the Greek and Roman worlds. It was one of the key aspects of antiquity that slipped under the line between the ancient world and Christianity erected by the early Church in late antiquity. Ancient rhetorical theory is obsessed with examples and discussions drawn from visual material. This book mines this rich seam of theoretical analysis from within Roman culture to present an internalist model for some aspects of how the Romans understood, made and appreciated their art. The understanding of public monuments like the Arch of Titus or Trajan's Column or of imperial statuary, domestic wall painting, funerary altars and sarcophagi, as well as of intimate items like children's dolls, is greatly enriched by being placed in relevant rhetorical contexts created by the Roman world.

Literate Education in the Hellenistic and Roman Worlds

Author: Teresa Morgan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 364

View: 545

Assessment of the content, structures and significance of education in Greek and Roman society.

Horace and His Lyric Poetry

Author: L. P. Wilkinson

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 185

View: 521

In this volume, first published in 1945, Mr Wilkinson writes primarily for students of the classics who are not Horatian specialists. His book falls easily within the scope of those who can read any Latin at all - and even of those who cannot, for most passages quoted are also translated. Horace - for Mr Wilkinson - is the poet of the Odes and the Epodes - the incomparable genius of the lyric form, and a sympathetic and engaging character into the bargain. He is especially concerned with Horace as the poetic craftsman. Like most Roman poets, Horace was not inventive in subject-matter: he generally wrote about what we now recognize as the eternal platitudes. But Mr Wilkinson focuses on the mastery of form, rhythm and cadence that have charmed readers for centuries.

Jewish Fictional Letters from Hellenistic Egypt

The Epistle of Aristeas and Related Literature

Author: L. Michael White

Publisher: SBL Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 490

View: 588

The first Greek text of the Epistle of Aristeas published in more than a century The Greek text Epistle of Aristeas is a Jewish work of the late Hellenistic period that recounts the origins of the Septuagint. Long recognized as a literary fiction, the Epistle of Aristeas has been variously dated from the third century BCE to the first century CE. As a result, its epistolary features, and especially those in which the putative author, Aristeas, addresses his brother and correspondent, Philocrates, have largely been ignored. In light of more recent scholarship on epistolary literature in the Greco-Roman world, however, this volume presents for the first time a complete Greek text and English Translation with introduction, notes, and commentary of the Epistle of Aristeas with key testimonia from Philo, Josephus, and Eusebius, as well as other related examples of Jewish fictional letters from the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha. Features Relevant excerpts from Eupolemus, 2 Maccabees, 3 Maccabees, and the Greek Additions to Esther with translations and introductions A critical introduction to ancient Greek letter-writing An outline of epistolary features in the text

A History of Greek Literature

From Homer to the Hellenistic Period

Author: Albrecht Dihle

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 318

The most up-to-date history of Greek literature from its Homeric origins to the age of Augustus. This magisterial survey by one of the leading European authorities on classical literature is establishing itself as the standard account.The most up-to-date history of Greek literature from its Homeric origins to the age of Augustus. Greek literary production throughout this period of some eight centuries is embedded in its historical and social context, and Professor Dihle sees this literature as a historical phenomenon, a particular mode of linguistic communication, with its specific forms developing both in an organic way and in response to the changing world around. In this it differs from conventional humanist approaches to Greek and Latin literature which analyse the works as objects of timeless value independent of any historical setting or purpose.This magisterial survey by one of the leading European authorities on classical literature will establish itself, as it already has in Germany, as the standard account of the subject.

Ancient Supplication

Author: Fred Naiden

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 321

This is the first book-length treatment of supplication, an important social practice in ancient Mediterranean civilizations. Despite the importance of supplication, it has received little attention, and no previous study has explored so many aspects of the practice. Naiden investigates the varied gestures made by the supplicants, the types of requests they make, the arguments used in defense of their requests, and the role of the supplicandus, who evaluates and decides whether to fulfill the requests. Varied and abundant sources invite comparison between the societies of Greece and Rome and also among literary genres. Additionally, Naiden formulates an analysis of the ritual in its legal and political contexts. In constructing this rich and thorough study, Naiden considered over 800 acts of supplication from Greek, Hebrew, and Roman literature, art, and scientific sources. 30 illustrations and a map of the relevant locations accompany the text.

Apocalypse, Prophecy, and Pseudepigraphy

On Jewish Apocalyptic Literature

Author: John J. Collins

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 399

View: 690

A highly regarded expert on the Jewish apocalyptic tradition, John J. Collins has written extensively on the subject. Nineteen of his essays written over the last fifteen years, including previously unpublished contributions, are brought together for the first time in this volume. Its thematic essays organized in five sections, Apocalypse, Prophecy, and Pseudepigraphy complements and enriches Collins’s well-known book The Apocalyptic Imagination.

History, Culture, and Religion of the Hellenistic Age

Author: Helmut Koester

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 443

View: 937

While the first American edition of this book, published more than a decade ago, was a revised translation of the German book, Einführung in das Neue Testament, this second edition of the first volume of the Introduction to the New Testament is no longer dependent upon a previously published German work. The author hopes that for the student of the New Testament it is a useful introduction into the many complex aspects of the political, cultural, and religious developments that characterized the world in which early Christianity arose and by which the New Testament and other early Christian writings were shaped.

The Roman Book

Author: Rex Winsbury

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 248

View: 830

The publishing of Roman books has long and often been misrepresented by false analogies with modern publishing. This comprehensive new study examines, by appeal to what Roman authors themselves tell us, both the raw materials and aesthetic criteria of the Roman book (a papyrus scroll) and the process of literary composition. What was the 'scribal art' of the time? What was the role of bookshops and libraries? What control did an author have over his creation? How were new books received and used by readers? To answer these questions Roman publishing is placed firmly in the context of a society that, despite the omnipresence of writing, was still predominantly oral. This context helps to explain how some books and authors became politically dangerous, and how the Roman book could be both a cultural icon and integral part of the self-definition of Rome's governing elite and a direct contributor to popular culture through the mass medium of the Roman theatre.

Imagining the Chorus in Augustan Poetry

Author: Lauren Curtis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 255

This book offers a new interpretation of Augustan literature, focusing on its imaginative reading of Greek musical culture.

The Apocalypse in the Light of the Temple

A New Approach to the Book of Revelation

Author: John Ben-Daniel

Publisher: Beit Yochanan Jerusalem

ISBN:

Category: Bible

Page: 266

View: 431

Literature and Religion at Rome

Cultures, Contexts, and Beliefs

Author: Denis Feeney

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 161

View: 727

A sophisticated and important short study of Roman religion.

History of Greek Literature

From Homer to the Hellenistic Period

Author: Albrecht Dihle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 777

The most up-to-date history of Greek literature from its Homeric origins to the age of Augustus. Greek literary production throughout this period of some eight centuries is embedded in its historical and social context, and Professor Dihle sees this literature as a historical phenomenon, a particular mode of linguistic communication, with its specific forms developing both in an organic way and in response to the changing world around. In this it differs from conventional humanist approaches to Greek and Latin literature which analyse the works as objects of timeless value independent of any historical setting or purpose. This magisterial survey by one of the leading European authorities on classical literature will establish itself, as it already has in Germany, as the standard account of the subject.

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