The Gold Hunters Of California 1904 PDF EPUB Download

The Gold Hunters Of California 1904 also available in docx and mobi. Read The Gold Hunters Of California 1904 online, read in mobile or Kindle.

Death Valley National Monument (N.M.), Natural and Cultural Resource Management Plan, Proposed (NV,CA)

Environmental Impact Statement

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 982

Historic Resource Study, a History of Mining in Death Valley National Monument

Author: Linda W. Greene

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Death Valley National Park (Calif. and Nev.)

Page:

View: 442

Gold Rushes and Mining Camps of the Early American West

Author: Vardis Fisher

Publisher: Caxton Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 466

View: 712

Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press Vardis Fisher and Opal Laurel Holmes bring together the stories of all of the remarkable men and women and all of the violent contrasts that made up one of the most entrhalling chapters in American history. Fisher, a respected scholar and versatile creative writer, devoted three years to the writing of this book.

Bloody Bay

Grassroots Policing in Nineteenth-Century San Francisco

Author: Darren A. Raspa

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 836

Bloody Bay recounts the gritty history of law enforcement in San Francisco. Beginning just before the California gold rush and through the six decades leading up to the twentieth century, a culture of popular justice and grassroots community peacekeeping was fostered. This policing environment was forged in the hinterland mining camps of the 1840s, molded in the 1851 and 1856 civilian vigilante policing movements, refined in the 1877 joint police and civilian Committee of Safety, and perfected by the Chinatown Squad experiment of the late nineteenth century. From the American takeover of California in 1846 during the U.S.–Mexico War to Police Commissioner Jesse B. Cook’s nationwide law enforcement advisory tour in 1912 and San Francisco’s debut as the jewel of a new American Pacific world during the Panama Pacific International Exposition in 1915, San Francisco’s culture of popular justice, its multiethnic environment, and the unique relationships built between informal and formal policing created a more progressive policing environment than anywhere else in the nation. Originally an isolated gold rush boomtown on the margins of a young nation, San Francisco—as illustrated in this untold story—rose to become a model for modern community policing and police professionalism.

William Randolph Hearst

The Early Years, 1863-1910

Author: Ben Procter

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 769

William Randolph Hearst was one of the most colorful and important figures of turn-of-the-century America, a man who changed the face of American journalism and whose influence extends to the present day. Now, in William Randolph Hearst, Ben Procter gives us the most authoritative account of Hearst's extraordinary career in newspapers and politics. Born to great wealth--his father was a partial owner of four fabulously rich mines--Hearst began his career in his early twenties by revitalizing a rundown newspaper, the San Franciso Examiner. Hearst took what had been a relatively sedate form of communicating information and essentially created the modern tabloid, complete with outrageous headlines, human interest stories, star columnists, comic strips, wide photo coverage, and crusading zeal. His papers fairly bristled with life. By 1910 he had built a newspaper empire--eight papers and two magazines read by nearly three million people. Hearst did much to create "yellow journalism"--with the emphasis on sensationalism and the lowering of journalistic standards. But Procter shows that Hearst's papers were also challenging and innovative and powerful: They exposed corruption, advocated progressive reforms, strongly supported recent immigrants, became a force in the Democratic Party, and helped ignite the Spanish-American War. Procter vividly depicts Hearst's own political career from his 1902 election to Congress to his presidential campaign in 1904 and his bitter defeats in New York's Mayoral and Gubernatorial races. Written with a broad narrative sweep and based on previously unavailable letters and manuscripts, William Randoph Hearst illuminates the character and era of the man who left an indelible mark on American journalism.

Strangers on Familiar Soil

Rediscovering the Chile-California Connection

Author: Edward D. Melillo

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: California

Page: 325

View: 251

A wide-ranging exploration of the diverse historical connections between Chile and California This groundbreaking history explores the many unrecognized, enduring linkages between the state of California and the country of Chile. The book begins in 1786, when a French expedition brought the potato from Chile to California, and it concludes with Chilean president Michelle Bachelet's diplomatic visit to the Golden State in 2008. During the intervening centuries, new crops, foods, fertilizers, mining technologies, laborers, and ideas from Chile radically altered California's development. In turn, Californian systems of servitude, exotic species, educational programs, and capitalist development strategies dramatically shaped Chilean history. Edward Dallam Melillo develops a new set of historical perspectives--tracing eastward-moving trends in U.S. history, uncovering South American influences on North America's development, and reframing the Western Hemisphere from a Pacific vantage point. His innovative approach yields transnational insights and recovers long-forgotten connections between the peoples and ecosystems of Chile and California.

George Hearst

Silver King of the Gilded Age

Author: Matthew Bernstein

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 274

View: 266

Rising from a Missouri boyhood and meager prospecting success to owning the most productive copper, silver, and gold mines in the world and being elected a United States senator, George Hearst (1820–91) spent decades veering between the heights of prosperity and the depths of financial ruin. In George Hearst: Silver King of the Gilded Age, Matthew Bernstein captures Hearst’s ascent, casting light on his actions during the Civil War, his tempestuous marriage to his cousin Phoebe, his role as disciplinarian and doting father to future media magnate William Randolph Hearst, and his devious methods of building the greatest mining empire in the West. Whether driving a pack of mules laden with silver from the Comstock Lode to San Francisco, bribing jurors in Pioche and Deadwood, or unearthing bonanzas in Utah and Montana Territories, Hearst’s cunning, energy, and industry were always evident, along with occasional glimmers of the villainy ascribed to him in the television series Deadwood. In this first full-length biography, George Hearst emerges in all his human dimensions and historical significance—an ambitious, complex, flawed, and quintessentially American character.

Death Valley to Deadwood; Kennecott to Cripple Creek

Proceedings of the Historic Mining Conference January 23-27, 1989, Death Valley National Monument

Author: United States. National Park Service. Division of National Register Programs

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Historic mines

Page: 219

View: 230

Papers address concerns by contractors and agencies in how to survey and nominate properties to the National Register of Historic Places and how to mitigate adverse actions on significant resources, management concerns related to historic mining sites on public lands, and interpretation and display of mining sites and materials. The focus is on the western United States, but other parts of the U.S. and western Canada are covered.

The Poker Bride

The First Chinese in the Wild West

Author: Christopher Corbett

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 835

This true story of a concubine and the Gold Rush years “delves deep into the soul of the real old west” (Erik Larson). “Once the discovery of gold at Sutter’s Mill launched our ‘national madness,’ the population of California exploded. Tens of thousands of Chinese, lured by tales of a ‘golden mountain,’ took passage across the Pacific. Among this massive influx were many young concubines who were expected to serve in the brothels sprouting up near the goldfields. One of them adopted the name of Polly Bemis, after an Idaho saloonkeeper, Charlie Bemis, won her in a poker game and married her. For decades the couple lived on an isolated, self-sufficient farm near the Salmon River in central Idaho. After her husband’s death, Polly came down to a nearby town and gradually spoke of her experiences. Journalist Christopher Corbett movingly recounts Polly’s story, integrating Polly’s personal history into the broader picture of the history of the mass immigration of Chinese. As both a personal and social history, this is an admirable book.” —Booklist “A gorgeously written and brilliantly researched saga of America during the mad flush of its biggest Gold Rush. Christopher Corbett’s genius is to anchor his larger story of Chinese immigration around a poor concubine named Polly. A tremendous achievement.” —Douglas Brinkley “Uses Bemis’s story as a platform for a larger discussion about the hardships of the Chinese experience in the American West.” —The Washington Post

The Infamous King Of The Comstock

William Sharon And The Gilded Age In The West

Author: Michael J. Makley

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 991

William Sharon was one of the most colorful scoundrels in the nineteenth-century mining West. He epitomized the robber barons of the nation’s Gilded Age and the political corruption and moral decay for which that period remains notorious; yet he was also a visionary capitalist who controlled more than a dozen of the greatest mines on Nevada’s mighty Comstock Lode, built the Virginia & Truckee Railroad, manipulated speculation and prices on the San Francisco Stock Exchange, and revived the collapsed Bank of California. One enemy called him “a thoroughly bad man—a man entirely void of principle,” while a Comstock neighbor called him “one of the best men that ever lived in Virginia City.” Both descriptions were reasonably accurate. In this first-ever biography of one of Nevada’s most reviled historical figures, author Michael Makley examines Sharon’s complex nature and the turbulent times in which he flourished. Arriving in San Francisco shortly after the Gold Rush began, Sharon was soon involved in real estate, politics, banking, and stock speculation, and he was a party in several of the era’s most shocking business and sexual scandals. When he moved to Virginia City, Nevada’s mushrooming silver boomtown, his business dealings there soon made him known as the “King of the Comstock.” Makley’s engaging and meticulously researched account not only lays bare the life of the notorious but enigmatic Sharon but examines the broader historical context of his career—the complex business relationships between San Francisco and the booming gold and silver mining camps of the Far West; the machinations of rampant Gilded Age capitalism; and the sophisticated financial and technological infrastructure that supported Virginia City’s boomtown economy. The Infamous King of the Comstock offers a significant fresh perspective on Nevada and the mining West.

News Notes of California Libraries

Author: California State Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Libraries

Page:

View: 461

Vols. for 1971- include annual reports and statistical summaries.

The Gold Hunters of California

Author: Thomas Edwin Farish

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: California

Page: 246

View: 996

Widener Library Shelflist: American history

Author: Harvard University. Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Classified catalogs

Page:

View: 554

Bulletin of the Brooklyn Public Library

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Brooklyn (New York, N.Y.)

Page:

View: 967

Bulletin (1901-195 )

Author: Brooklyn Public Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 791

Contributions to Economic Geology, 1904

Author: Samuel Franklin Emmons

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Geology, Economic

Page: 620

View: 469

Bulletin

Author: Brooklyn Public Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 736

Gold Hunters of the North

Author: Jack London

Publisher: Shorey's Bookstore

ISBN:

Category: Gold miners

Page: 12

View: 602

Annual List of Books Added to the Public Library of Cincinnati

Author: Public Library of Cincinnati

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Classified catalogs

Page:

View: 489

A Bibliography of the History of California and the Pacific West 1510-1906

Author: Robert Ernest Cowan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: California

Page: 318

View: 107