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Crafting Equality

America's Anglo-African Word

Author: Celeste Michelle Condit

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

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Category: History

Page: 355

View: 608

Drawing on speeches, newspapers, magazines, and other public discourse, Condit and Lucaites survey the shifting meaning of equality from 1760 to the present as a process of interaction and negotiation among different social groups in American politics and culture.

¬The North American Review

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The North American Review

Author: Jared Sparks

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Category: American fiction

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View: 276

Vols. 277-230, no. 2 include Stuff and nonsense, v. 5-6, no. 8, Jan. 1929-Aug. 1930.

The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature

Author: Steven R. Serafin

Publisher: A&C Black

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1305

View: 659

More than ten years in the making, this comprehensive single-volume literary survey is for the student, scholar, and general reader. The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature represents a collaborative effort, involving 300 contributors from across the US and Canada. Composed of more than 1,100 signed biographical-critical entries, this Encyclopedia serves as both guide and companion to the study and appreciation of American literature. A special feature is the topical article, of which there are 70.

The Plain and Noble Garb of Truth

Nationalism & Impartiality in American Historical Writing, 1784-1860

Author: Eileen K. Cheng

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

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Category: History

Page: 368

View: 440

American historians of the early national period, argues Eileen Ka-May Cheng, grappled with objectivity, professionalism, and other “modern” issues to a greater degree than their successors in later generations acknowledge. Her extensive readings of antebellum historians show that by the 1820s, a small but influential group of practitioners had begun to develop many of the doctrines and concerns that undergird contemporary historical practice. The Plain and Noble Garb of Truth challenges the entrenched notion that America’s first generations of historians were romantics or propagandists for a struggling young nation. Cheng engages with the works of well-known early national historians like George Bancroft, William Prescott, and David Ramsay; such lesser-known figures as Jared Sparks and Lorenzo Sabine; and leading political and intellectual elites of the day, including Francis Bowen and Charles Francis Adams. She shows that their work, which focused on the American Revolution, was often nuanced and surprisingly sympathetic in its treatment of American Indians and loyalists. She also demonstrates how the rise of the novel contributed to the emergence of history as an autonomous discipline, arguing that paradoxically “early national historians at once described truth in opposition to the novel and were influenced by the novel in their understanding of truth.” Modern historians should recognize that the discipline of history is itself a product of history, says Cheng. By taking seriously a group of too-often-dismissed historians, she challenges contemporary historians to examine some ahistorical aspects of the way they understand their own discipline.

The Anglo-American Paper War

Debates about the New Republic, 1800–1825

Author: J. Eaton

Publisher: Springer

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Category: History

Page: 234

View: 971

The Paper War and the Development of Anglo-American Nationalisms, 1800-1825 offers fresh insight into the evolution of British and American nationalisms, the maturation of apologetics for slavery, and the early development of anti-Americanism, from approximately 1800 to 1830.

Legal Science in the Early Republic

The Origins of American Legal Thought and Education

Author: Steven J. Macias

Publisher: Lexington Books

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Category: Political Science

Page: 226

View: 367

This work examines the intellectual motivations behind the concept of “legal science”—the first coherent American jurisprudential movement after Independence. Drawing mainly upon public, but also private, sources, this book considers the goals of the bar’s professional leaders who were most adamant and deliberate in setting out their visions of legal science. It argues that these legal scientists viewed the realm of law as the means through which they could express their hopes and fears associated with the social and cultural promises and perils of the early republic. Law, perhaps more so than literature or even the natural sciences, provided the surest path to both national stability and international acclaim. While legal science yielded the methodological tools needed to achieve these lofty goals, its naturalistic foundations, more importantly, were at least partly responsible for the grand impulses in the first place. This book first considers the content of legal science and then explores its application by several of the most articulate legal scientists working and writing in the early republic.

Pilot, The

Author: James Fenimore Cooper

Publisher: SUNY Press

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Category: Fiction

Page: 479

View: 533

Epic story an aircraft carrier under attack in the Pacific Ocean--the attackers leave none alive. Except one. Tony Chappel manages to survive the horrific event and becomes stranded on a deserted island alone, without any hope of rescue. He fights for survival and has to live with what he fears most. Not only does Tony struggle with the death of his friends but also the struggle within himself to live for a greater purpose.

The Pilot

Author: James Fenimore Cooper

Publisher: SUNY Press

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Category: Fiction

Page: 479

View: 111

Epic story an aircraft carrier under attack in the Pacific Ocean--the attackers leave none alive. Except one. Tony Chappel manages to survive the horrific event and becomes stranded on a deserted island alone, without any hope of rescue. He fights for survival and has to live with what he fears most. Not only does Tony struggle with the death of his friends but also the struggle within himself to live for a greater purpose.

The Oxford Handbook of William Wordsworth

Author: Richard Gravil

Publisher: OUP Oxford

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 650

View: 986

The Oxford Handbook of William Wordsworth deploys its forty-eight original essays, by an international team of scholar-critics, to present a stimulating account of Wordsworth's life and achievement and to map new directions in criticism. Nineteen essays explore the highlights of a long career systematically, giving special prominence to the lyric Wordsworth of Lyrical Ballads and the Poems in Two Volumes and to the blank verse poet of 'The Recluse'. Most of the other essays return to the poetry while exploring other dimensions of the life and work of the major Romantic poet. The result is a dialogic exploration of many major texts and problems in Wordsworth scholarship. This uniquely comprehensive handbook is structured so as to present, in turn, Wordsworth's life, career, and networks; aspects of the major lyrical and narrative poetry; components of 'The Recluse'; his poetical inheritance and his transformation of poetics; the variety of intellectual influences upon his work, from classical republican thought to modern science; his shaping of modern culture in such fields as gender, landscape, psychology, ethics, politics, religion and ecology; and his 19th- and 20th-century reception-most importantly by poets, but also in modern criticism and scholarship.

Index to the North American Review, Volumes I.-CXXV., 1815-1877

Author: William Cushing

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Category: North American review

Page: 153

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The Selected Letters of Mary Moody Emerson

Author: Mary Moody Emerson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

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Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 622

View: 106

Scholars have long recognized that Mary Moody Emerson (1774-1863) had a vital influence on the intellectual development of her nephew, Ralph Waldo Emerson, during his most formative years. The extent of that influence--and the quality of Mary Emerson's own mind--are apparent, however, only through her extensive correspondence spanning seventy years. The Selected Letters of Mary Moody Emerson makes available for the first time this important collection of letters within the Emerson family papers and firmly establishes Mary Emerson as a woman of strong and independent mind. Moreover, as Emerson himself realized, his aunt's letters reveal much about the political, social, and religious concerns that dominated her age--the critical period from the American Revolution to the Civil War. Mary Emerson rejoiced in what she called a "period of wonderfull revolutions" and through her correspondence engaged actively in the disputes of the time. During these years the new Constitution was tried and tested, most severely by slavery and the Civil War but also by the War of 1812, the rapid expansion westward, and the increasingly materialistic and capitalistic pursuits of the American people. These letters contain wide references to the people, events, and controversies of the period. They also reveal the impact of changing conditions on an individual woman--a woman of curiosity and self-reliance who sought to define herself in a patriarchal culture. Ralph Waldo Emerson once commented that in her "prime" Mary Emerson was the "best writer in New England". The letter became her art form, and she managed to transform it into a vehicle for free discussion. Her many correspondents--fifty-five in all--included her Emerson nephews William, Waldo, Edward, and Charles, as well as Charles's fiancee, Elizabeth Hoar, and Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley. For this edition, Nancy Simmons has chosen some 333 letters that represent the contours of Mary Emerson's life and thought. A valuable contribution to literary, historical, religious, and feminist scholarship, The Selected Letters of Mary Moody Emerson recovers from the footnotes of literary history a woman of considerable intellectual influence.

Removals

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and the Politics of Indian Affairs

Author: Lucy Maddox

Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

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This book resituates some familiar nineteenth-century texts within the context of public debates about the place of American Indians in the civil and cultural institutions of the new American nation. Rereading texts by Melville, Hawthorne, Child, Sedgwick, Thoreau, Fuller, and Parkman, Maddox demonstrates the pervasiveness of the anxieties produced by discussion of "the Indian question" and shows how extensively they influenced the production and reception of writing in the first half of the century.

The Culture of Classicism

Ancient Greece and Rome in American Intellectual Life, 1780-1910

Author: Caroline Winterer

Publisher: JHU Press

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Category: Education

Page: 256

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Winner of the New Scholars Book Award from the American Educational Research Association Debates continue to rage over whether American university students should be required to master a common core of knowledge. In The Culture of Classicism: Ancient Greece and Rome in American Intellectual Life, 1780–1910, Caroline Winterer traces the emergence of the classical model that became standard in the American curriculum in the nineteenth century and now lies at the core of contemporary controversies. By closely examining university curricula and the writings of classical scholars, Winterer demonstrates how classics was transformed from a narrow, language-based subject to a broader study of civilization, persuasively arguing that we cannot understand both the rise of the American university and modern notions of selfhood and knowledge without an appreciation for the role of classicism in their creation.

THE NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW VOL. CXXI.

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James Fenimore Cooper

The Early Years

Author: Wayne Franklin

Publisher: Yale University Press

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 708

View: 635

Reassesses the life and work of the early American writer who established genres such as the Western, the sea tale, and Revolutionary War romance.

The View from the Masthead

Maritime Imagination and Antebellum American Sea Narratives

Author: Hester Blum

Publisher: UNC Press Books

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

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With long, solitary periods at sea, far from literary and cultural centers, sailors comprise a remarkable population of readers and writers. Although their contributions have been little recognized in literary history, seamen were important figures in the nineteenth-century American literary sphere. In the first book to explore their unique contribution to literary culture, Hester Blum examines the first-person narratives of working sailors, from little-known sea tales to more famous works by Herman Melville, James Fenimore Cooper, Edgar Allan Poe, and Richard Henry Dana. In their narratives, sailors wrote about how their working lives coexisted with--indeed, mutually drove--their imaginative lives. Even at leisure, they were always on the job site. Blum analyzes seamen's libraries, Barbary captivity narratives, naval memoirs, writings about the Galapagos Islands, Melville's sea vision, and the crisis of death and burial at sea. She argues that the extent of sailors' literacy and the range of their reading were unusual for a laboring class, belying the popular image of Jack Tar as merely a swaggering, profane, or marginal figure. As Blum demonstrates, seamen's narratives propose a method for aligning labor and contemplation that has broader applications for the study of American literature and history.

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Publisher: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers

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The Decline of Natural Law

How American Lawyers Once Used Natural Law and Why They Stopped

Author: Stuart Banner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Category: Law

Page: 264

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In The Decline of Natural Law, Stuart Banner explores a fundamental change in the way American lawyers thought about the law. Until the late 19th century, lawyers understood the law in part as something found in nature, the way we think of scientific laws today. After the change, by contrast, lawyers understood the law as something entirely made by people, especially by judges. The book explains the reasons for this change and how it affected the legalsystem.

The Role of the American Board in the World

Bicentennial Reflections on the Organization's Missionary Work, 1810-2010

Author: Clifford Putney

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

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Category: Religion

Page: 380

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The American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) was the country's first creator of overseas Christian missions. Founded in 1810 and supported by a coalition of Calvinist denominations, the ABCFM established the first American missions in India, China, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and many other places. It was America's largest missionary organization in the nineteenth century, and its influence was immense. Its missionaries established the first Western schools and hospitals in many parts of the world, and they successfully promoted women's rights and other ideals from the Enlightenment. They also transformed oral languages such as Zulu, Hawaiian, and Cherokee into written form, and they preserved many elements of premodern cultures (albeit not always intentionally). The contributors to this book provide valuable insights on the work of the ABCFM (which exists today under a different name). Some of the contributors profile the lives of notable ABCFM missionaries, others focus on ideological shifts within the Board, and still others chronicle the Board's role in historic events, including the Opium Wars, the colonization of Hawai'i, and the Armenian Genocide. From reading this book, people will come to understand why the ABCFM is widely viewed as America's most historically significant missionary organization. Table of Contents: Illustrations Contributors Acknowledgments Introduction The 1810 Formation of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions --Douglas K. Showalter The Great Debate: The American Board and the Doctrine of Future Probation --Sharon A. Taylor Commercial Philanthropy: ABCFM Missionaries and the American Opium Trade --Timothy Mason Roberts American Board Schools in Turkey --Dorothy Birge Keller and Robert S. Keller Dr. Ruth A. Parmelee and the Changing Role of Near East Missionaries in Early Twentieth Century Turkey --Virginia A. Metaxas From Brimstone to the World's Fair: A Century of 'Modern Missions' as Seen through the American Hume Missionary Family in Bombay --Alice C. Hunsberger David Abeel, Missionary Wanderer in China and Southeast Asia; With Special Emphasis on His Visit with Walter Henry Medhurst in Batavia, January-June 1831 --Thomas G. Oey Japanese Evangelists, American Board Missionaries, and Protestant Growth in Early Meiji Japan: A Case Study of the Annaka Kyokai --Hamish Ion Nellie J. Arnott, Angola Mission Teacher, and the Culture of the ABCFM on Its Hundredth Anniversary --Ann Ellis Pullen and Sarah Ruffing Robbins The International Institute in Spain: Alice Gordon Gulick and Her Legacy --Stephen K. Ault Early Nineteenth Century Missionaries to Hawai'i and the Salary Dispute --Paul T. Burlin Titus Coan: 'Apostle to the Sandwich Islands' --Donald Philip Corr Christianity Builds a Nest in Hawai'i --Regina Pfeiffer 'We will banish the polluted thing from our houses': Missionaries, Drinking, and Temperance in the Sandwich Islands --Jennifer Fish Kashay Domesticity Abroad: Work and Family in the Sandwich Islands Mission, 1820-1840 --Char Miller Afterword For Heaven's Sake --Char Miller Subject/Name Index