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Rights of Man, Common Sense, and Other Political Writings

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 112

Paine was the first international revolutionary. His Common Sense was the most widely read pamphlet of the American Revolution; his Rights of Man was the most famous defence of the French. He was an examplary democrat whise ideas still capture broadly the beliefs behind liberal welfare states today.

Rights of Man

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: France

Page: 153

View: 687

The Rights Of Man Today

Author: Louis Henkin

Publisher: Westview Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 173

View: 284

Derives from lectures delivered at Yeshiva University as Benjamin Gottesman lectures.

Rights of Man ; And, Common Sense

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher: Everyman's Library

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 264

Collects Paine's political writings about the American and French revolutions

Rights of Man

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher: Binker North

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 171

View: 487

The Rights of Man (1791), a book by Thomas Paine posits that popular political revolution is permissible when a government does not safeguard the natural rights of its people.

An International Bill of the Rights of Man

Author: Hersch Lauterpacht

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 230

View: 388

International Law and Human Rights, first published in 1950, is one of the seminal works on international human rights law. Its author, Sir Hersch Lauterpacht, is widely considered to be one of the great international lawyers of the 20th century. It continues to influence those studying and working in international human rights law today. It includes Professor Lauterpacht's philosophical study of human rights, including the role of the individual within the international legal order; his study of natural law and natural rights; a key analysis of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights; and Professor Lauterpacht's own draft Bill of Human Rights. This republication once again makes this book available to scholars and students in the field. It features a new introduction by Professor Philippe Sands, QC, examining the world in which International Law and Human Rights was originally published and the lasting legacy of this classic work.

The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of Citizens

Author: Max Farrand

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 34

View: 943

The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of Citizens By Max Farrand The declaration of "the rights of man and of citizens" by the French Constituent Assembly on August 26, 1789, is one of the most significant events of the French Revolution. It has been criticised from different points of view with directly opposing results. The political scientist and the historian, thoroughly appreciating its importance, have repeatedly come to the conclusion that the Declaration had no small part in the anarchy with which France was visited soon after the storming of the Bastille. They point to its abstract phrases as ambiguous and therefore dangerous, and as void of all political reality and practical statesmanship. Its empty pathos, they say, confused the mind, disturbed calm judgment, aroused passions, and stifled the sense of duty, -for of duty there is not a word. Others, on the contrary, and especially Frenchmen, have exalted it as a revelation in the world's history, as a catechism of the "principles of 1789" which form the eternal foundation of the state's structure, and they have glorified it as the most precious gift that France has given to mankind. We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

The Rights of Man, (not Paines,) But the Rights of Man, in the West Indies

Author: Anthropos

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Antislavery movements

Page: 47

View: 153

THE RIGHTS OF MAN: The French Revolution – Ideals, Arguments & Motives

Being an Answer to Mr. Burke's Attack on the French Revolution

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 205

View: 532

Thomas Paine's "Rights of Man" is born from his need to defend social mutiny and it posits that popular political revolution is permissible when a government does not safeguard the natural rights of its people. Using these points as a base Paine defends the French Revolution against Edmund Burke's attack in Reflections on the Revolution in France. Paine argues that the interests of the monarch and his people are united, and insists that the French Revolution should be understood as one which attacks the despotic principles of the French monarchy, not the king himself. Principally, Rights of Man opposes the idea of hereditary government – the belief that dictatorial government is necessary, because of man's corrupt, essential nature. Rights of Man concludes in proposing practical reformations of English government: a written Constitution composed by a national assembly, in the American mould; the elimination of aristocratic titles, because democracy is incompatible with primogeniture. Thomas Paine's intellectual influence is perceptible in the two great political revolutions of the eighteenth century. He dedicated Rights of Man to George Washington and to the Marquis de Lafayette, acknowledging the importance of the American and the French revolutions in his formulating the principles of modern democratic governance. Thomas Paine (1737-1809) was an English-American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary. One of the Founding Fathers of the United States, he authored the two most influential pamphlets at the start of the American Revolution, and he inspired the rebels in 1776 to declare independence from Britain. Paine's ideas reflected Enlightenment-era rhetoric of transnational human rights.

Burke, Paine, and the Rights of Man

A Difference of Political Opinion

Author: R. R. Fennessy

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: France

Page: 277

View: 840

The Rights of Man

Author: H. G. Wells

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 176

View: 273

H. G. Wells' revolutionary human rights manifesto is reissued by Penguin with a new introduction by fellow novelist and human rights campaigner Ali Smith 'Penguin and Pelican Specials are books of topical importance published within as short a time as possible from receipt of the manuscript. Some are reprints of famous books brought up-to-date, but usually they are entirely new books published for the first time.' H. G. Wells wrote The Rights of Man in 1940, partly in response to the ongoing war with Germany. The fearlessly progressive ideas he set out were instrumental in the creation of the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the EU's European Convention on Human Rights and the UK's Human Rights Act. When first published, this manifesto was an urgently topical reaction to a global miscarriage of justice. It was intended to stimulate debate and make a clear statement of mankind's immutable responsibilities to itself. Seventy-five years have passed and once again we face a humanitarian crisis. In the UK our human rights are under threat in ways that they never have been before and overseas peoples are being displaced from their homelands in their millions. The international community must act decisively, cooperatively and fast. The Rights of Man is not an 'entirely new book' - but it is a book of topical importance and it has been published, now as before, in as short a time as possible, in order to react to the sudden and urgent need. With a new introduction by award-winning novelist and human rights campaigner Ali Smith, Penguin reissues one of the most important humanitarian texts of the twentieth century in the hope that it will continue to stimulate debate and remind our leaders - and each other - of the essential priorities and responsibilities of mankind.

A Vindication of the Rights of Men; A Vindication of the Rights of Woman; An Historical and Moral View of the French Revolution

Author: Mary Wollstonecraft

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 464

View: 840

This volume brings together extracts of the major political writings of Mary Wollstonecraft in the order in which they appeared in the revolutionary 1790s. It traces her passionate and indignant response to the excitement of the early days of the French Revolution and then her uneasiness at its later bloody phase. It reveals her developing understanding of women's involvement in the political and social life of the nation and her growing awareness of the relationship between politics and economics and between political institutions and the individual. In personal terms, the works show her struggling with a belief in the perfectibility of human nature through rational education, a doctrine that became weaker under the onslaught of her own miserable experience and the revolutionary massacres. Janet Todd's introduction illuminates the progress of Wollstonecraft's thought, showing that a reading of all three works allows her to emerge as a more substantial political writer than a study of The Rights of Woman alone can reveal. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Rights of Man Annotated

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 340

View: 500

Rights of Man (1791), a book by Thomas Paine, including 31 articles, posits that popular political revolution is permissible when a government does not safeguard the natural rights of its people. Using these points as a base it defends the French Revolution against Edmund Burke's attack in Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).It was published in two parts in March 1791 and February 1792.

Political Theory and the Rights of Man

Author: David Daiches Raphael

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Civil rights

Page: 151

View: 548

A symposium of ten essays, five of which are revised versions of papers presented at the sixth world conference of the International Political Science Association. Bibliographical references included in "Notes" (p. [134]-142).

An Illustration of the Rights of Man: Being an Answer to Mr. Burke's Attack on the French Revolution [The Author Identified on the Verso of the Titlepage as Mr. Paine]

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: France

Page: 129

View: 423

The Life and Writings of Thomas Paine: The rights of man. v. 1-v. 5. The rights of man. v. 2; Miscellany

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 703

Thomas Paine's Rights of Man

A Biography

Author: Christopher Hitchens

Publisher: Atlantic

ISBN:

Category: Political science

Page: 176

View: 100

Thomas Paine's "Rights of Man" has been celebrated, criticized, maligned, suppressed, and co-opted, but Hitchens marvels at its forethought and revels in its contentiousness. In this book, he demonstrates how Paine's book forms the philosophical cornerstone of the U.S.

The Rights Of Man

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 204

View: 652

Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man argues that human rights are inherent. As such, they cannot be conferred on citizens by their governments because to do so would mean that these rights can be revoked by that same government. Paine further suggests that government is responsible for protecting the rights of men, and therefore, the interests of governments and citizens are united. Within this context, Paine argues that revolution is acceptable when the rights of men are not respected or defended by their governments. Originally published in two volumes in 1791 and 1792, Paine’s discourse reflected on the French Revolution, and positioned the uprising as an attack against a corrupt governing system, rather than a personal attack on the king himself. As a result of his arguments in favour of revolution and social welfare, Thomas Paine was tried and convicted of seditious libel against the Crown of England, and sentenced, in absentia, to hanging. Resident in France at the time of his British trial, Paine never returned to England. HarperTorch brings great works of non-fiction and the dramatic arts to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperTorch collection to build your digital library.

Rights of Man

Classic Original Edition On Human Rights (Annotated)

Author: Thomas Paine

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 340

View: 752

Rights of Man (1791), a book by Thomas Paine, including 31 articles, posits that popular political revolution is permissible when a government does not safeguard the natural rights of its people. Using these points as a base it defends the French Revolution against Edmund Burke's attack in Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).It was published in two parts in March 1791 and February 1792.

The Rights of Man

Thomas Paine

Author: Paine

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 140

View: 760

Thomas Paine's The Rights of Man Rights of Man (1791), a book by Thomas Paine, including 31 articles, posits that popular political revolution is permissible when a government does not safeguard the natural rights of its people. Using these points as a base it defends the French Revolution against Edmund Burke's attack in Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790). It was published in two parts in March 1791 and February 1792. From the part Mr. Burke took in the American Revolution, it was natural that I should consider him a friend to mankind; and as our acquaintance commenced on that ground, it would have been more agreeable to me to have had cause to continue in that opinion than to change it. At the time Mr. Burke made his violent speech last winter in the English Parliament against the French Revolution and the National Assembly, I was in Paris, and had written to him but a short time before to inform him how prosperously matters were going on. Soon after this I saw his advertisement of the Pamphlet he intended to publish: As the attack was to be made in a language but little studied, and less understood in France, and as everything suffers by translation, I promised some of the friends of the Revolution in that country that whenever Mr. Burke's Pamphlet came forth, I would answer it. This appeared to me the more necessary to be done, when I saw the flagrant misrepresentations which Mr. Burke's Pamphlet contains; and that while it is an outrageous abuse on the French Revolution, and the principles of Liberty, it is an imposition on the rest of the world.