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The Rise of the Roman Empire

Author: Polybius

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 886

The Greek statesman Polybius (c.200–118 BC) wrote his account of the relentless growth of the Roman Empire in order to help his fellow countrymen understand how their world came to be dominated by Rome. Opening with the Punic War in 264 BC, he vividly records the critical stages of Roman expansion: its campaigns throughout the Mediterranean, the temporary setbacks inflicted by Hannibal and the final destruction of Carthage. An active participant of the politics of his time as well as a friend of many prominent Roman citizens, Polybius drew on many eyewitness accounts in writing this cornerstone work of history.

The Rise of Rome

Author: Plutarch

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 832

View: 670

The biographies collected in this volume bring together Plutarch's Lives of those great men who established the city of Rome and consolidated its supremacy, and his Comparisons with their notable Greek counterparts. Here he pairs Romulus, mythical founder of Rome, with Theseus, who brought Athens to power, and compares the admirable Numa and Lycurgus for bringing order to their communities, while Titus Flamininus and Philopoemen are portrayed as champions of freedom. As well as providing an illuminating picture of the first century AD, Plutarch depicts complex and nuanced heroes who display the essential virtues of Greek civilization - courage, patriotism, justice, intelligence and reason - that contributed to the rise of Rome. These new and revised translations by W. Jeffrey Tatum and Ian Scott-Kilvert capture Plutarch's elegant prose and narrative flair. This edition also includes a general introduction, individual introductions to each of the Lives and Comparisons, further reading and notes. The Rise of Rome is the penultimate title in Penguin Classics' complete revised Plutarch in six volumes. Other titles include Rome In Crisis, On Sparta, Fall of the Roman Republic, The Age of Alexander and The Rise and Fall of Athens (forthcoming 2014).

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

Author: Edward Gibbon

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 848

View: 637

Spanning thirteen centuries from the age of Trajan to the taking of Constantinople by the Turks, DECLINE & FALL is one of the greatest narratives in European Literature. David Womersley's masterly selection and bridging commentary enables the readerto acquire a general sense of the progress and argument of the whole work and displays the full variety of Gibbon's achievement.

Exploring the Life, Myth, and Art of Ancient Rome

Author: Tony Allan

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 144

View: 821

Presents an introduction to the ancient civilization of Rome, discussing its history, politics, military conquests, art, religion, literature, everday life, and gods and goddesses.

Roman Shields

Author: John and Hilary Travis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 513

The Roman military is an iconic, ancient institution; everybody is familiar with the image of fearsome Roman centurions marching in their famous columns. In this book, Roman military experts John and Hilary Travis turn their attention to the shields used by the historic Roman stalwarts, drawing on their expertise, their wealth of illustrated material and the world of re-enactments. In its study of the panoply of shields used by the Romans, Roman Shields differs from those preceding in that it has drawn together the streams of published information of sculptural imagery and archaeological 'hard' evidence, while also looking at the component parts, how they are physically put together, and attempting to reproduce the aspects of the artefacts observed through reconstructing them and subjecting them to regular use and combat conditions.

The Rise of Rome

The Making of the World's Greatest Empire

Author: Anthony Everitt

Publisher: Head of Zeus

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 808

Beginning with the founding myths of Romulus and Remus and a succession of probably fictitious kings, Anthony Everitt charts the development of Rome from its origins as a small market town in the eighth century BC, through various forms of patrician government, up to Caesar's victory in the Civil War that defeated the Roman Republic and paved the way for Augustus to transform republican oligarchy into imperial autocracy. Using recent archaeological evidence and historical facts, and a wealth of legend and anecdote, Everitt shows how Rome grew – both internally, via ever more ambitious construction projects, and externally, through successful military campaigns. In doing so, he highlights some fascinating parallels between ancient Roman society and the modern world. As readable and accessible as it is authoritative and scholarly, THE RISE OF ROME is the perfect introduction to Roman history and civilization for the general reader.

The Rise and Decline of American Religious Freedom

Author: Steven D. Smith

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 240

View: 125

Familiar accounts of religious freedom in the United States often tell a story of visionary founders who broke from centuries-old patterns of Christendom to establish a political arrangement committed to secular and religiously neutral government. These novel commitments were supposedly embodied in the religion clauses of the First Amendment. But this story is largely a fairytale, Steven Smith says in this incisive examination of a much-mythologized subject. The American achievement was not a rejection of Christian commitments but a retrieval of classic Christian ideals of freedom of the church and of conscience. Smith maintains that the First Amendment was intended merely to preserve the political status quo in matters of religion. America's distinctive contribution was, rather, a commitment to open contestation between secularist and providentialist understandings of the nation which evolved over the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century, far from vindicating constitutional principles, as conventional wisdom suggests, the Supreme Court imposed secular neutrality, which effectively repudiated this commitment to open contestation. Instead of upholding what was distinctively American and constitutional, these decisions subverted it. The negative consequences are visible today in the incoherence of religion clause jurisprudence and the intense culture wars in American politics.

The Rise of the Romans

The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, 753 Bc - 476 Ad, a Chronology

Author: Brian Taylor

Publisher: History Pr Ltd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 125

The Rise and Fall of the Romans provides a chronological account of the formation, battles and campaigns of the Roman state and democracy, from the foundation and growth of the city, to the epic struggles with Carthage during the Punic Wars and the resultant expansion throughout the Mediterranean.

Rome in Crisis

Author: Plutarch

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 752

View: 303

Bringing together nine biographies from Plutarch's Parallel Lives series, this edition examines the lives of major figures in Roman history, from Lucullus (118-57 BC), an aristocratic politician and conqueror of Eastern kingdoms, to Otho (32-69 AD), a reckless young noble who consorted with the tyrannical, debauched emperor Nero before briefly becoming a dignified and gracious emperor himself. Ian Scott-Kilvert's and Christopher Pelling's translations are accompanied by a new introduction, and also includes a separate introduction for each biography, comparative essays of the major figures, suggested further reading, notes and maps.

The Fall Of The West

The Death Of The Roman Superpower

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 136

A sweeping narrative of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire. The Fall of the Roman Empire has been a best-selling subject since the 18th century. Since then, over 200 very diverse reasons have been advocated for the collapse of the western half of the Roman Empire. Until very recently, the academic view embarrassedly downplayed the violence and destruction, in an attempt to provide a more urbane account of late antiquity: barbarian invasions were mistakenly described as the movement of peoples. It was all painfully tame and civilised. But now Adrian Goldsworthy comes forward with his trademark combination of clear narrative, common sense, and a thorough mastery of the sources. In telling the story from start to finish, he rescues the era from the diffident and mealy-mouthed: this is a red-blooded account of aggressive barbarian attacks, palace coups, scheming courtiers and corrupt emperors who set the bar for excess. It is 'old fashioned history' in the best sense: an accessible narrative with colourful characters whose story reveals the true reasons for the fall of Rome.

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