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The World, the Text, and the Critic

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 327

View: 429

Argues that contemporary critics force works of literature to fit their theories and examines the impact of Marxism, linguistics, psychoanalysis, and structuralism on literary criticism

The World, the Text, and the Critic

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Criticism

Page: 327

View: 917

The World, the Text, and the Indian

Global Dimensions of Native American Literature

Author: Scott Richard Lyons

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 346

View: 572

Advances critical conversations in Native American literary studies by situating its subject in global, transnational, and modernizing contexts. Since the rise of the Native American Renaissance in literature and culture during the American civil rights period, a rich critical discourse has been developed to provide a range of interpretive frameworks for the study, recovery, and teaching of Native American literary and cultural production. For the past few decades the dominant framework has been nationalism, a critical perspective placing emphasis on specific tribal nations and nationalist concepts. While this nationalist intervention has produced important insights and questions regarding Native American literature, culture, and politics it has not always attended to the important fact that Native texts and writers have also always been globalized. The World, the Text, and the Indian breaks from this framework by examining Native American literature not for its tribal-national significance but rather its connections to global, transnational, and cosmopolitan forces. Essays by leading scholars in the field assume that Native American literary and cultural production is global in character; even claims to sovereignty and self-determination are made in global contexts and influenced by global forces. Spanning from the nineteenth century to the present day, these analyses of theories, texts, and methods—from trans-indigenous to cosmopolitan, George Copway to Sherman Alexie, and indigenous feminism to book history—interrogate the dialects of global indigeneity and settler colonialism in literary and visual culture.

The Edward Said Reader

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 512

View: 690

Edward Said, the renowned literary and cultural critic and passionately engaged intellectual, is one of our era's most formidable, provocative, and important thinkers. For more than three decades his books, which include Culture and Imperialism, Peace and Its Discontents, and the seminal study Orientalism, have influenced not only our worldview but the very terms of public discourse. The Edward Said Reader includes key sections from all of Said's books, from the groundbreaking 1966 study of Joseph Conrad to his new memoir, Out of Place. Whether he is writing of Zionism or Palestinian self-determination, Jane Austen or Yeats, music or the media, Said's uncompromising intelligence casts urgent light on every subject he undertakes. The Edward Said Reader will prove a joy to the general reader and an indispensable resource for scholars of politics, history, literature, and cultural studies: in short, of all those fields that his work has influenced and, in some cases, transformed.

Reflections on Exile and Other Essays

Author: Edward W. Said

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 617

View: 527

With their powerful blend of political and aesthetic concerns, Edward W. Said's writings have transformed the field of literary studies. This long-awaited collection of literary and cultural essays offers evidence of how much the fully engaged critical mind can contribute to the reservoir of value, thought, and action essential to our lives and culture.

The Character of Criticism

Author: Geoffrey Galt Harpham

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 195

View: 350

Why are some critical texts more compelling, memorable, or engaging than others? Can criticism be judged as a discourse of description, explanation, and analysis alone, or do our evaluations reflect other kinds of investments in it? In this book, Geoffrey Galt Harpham argues that the most powerful and effective criticism demands to be read as an expression of a distinctive sensibility, a way of being in the world; it demands, in other words, to be read as a discourse of character. Through a series of detailed and intimate intellectual portraits of leading critics--Elaine Scarry, Martha Nussbaum, Slavoj Zizek, and Edward Said--Harpham unfolds the complex and indirect ways in which human character is expressed in criticism. A final chapter on "Criticism in a State of Terror" assesses the contemporary situation. The Character of Criticism represents not just a snapshot of contemporary criticism but a fresh approach to criticism itself that clarifies the stakes involved for writers and readers of criticism alike. It does so not by making difficult thinking easy but by making it stranger--more idiosyncratic, exotic, and singular.

Deconstruction After 9/11

Author: Martin McQuillan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 16

View: 124

In this book Martin McQuillan brings Derrida's writing into the immediate vicinity of geo-politics today, from the Kosovan conflict to the war in Iraq. The chapters in this book follow both Derrida's writing since Specters of Marx and the present political scene through the former Yogoslavia and Afghanistan to Palestine and Baghdad. His 'textual activism' is as impatient with the universal gestures of philosophy as it is with the complacency and reductionism of policy-makers and activists alike. This work records a response to the war on thinking that has marked western discourse since 9/11.

Milton's Secrecy

And Philosophical Hermeneutics

Author: James Dougal Fleming

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 379

Milton's Secrecy argues that the work of John Milton presents a theory of interpretation - or hermeneutics - emphasizing openness and recognition over hiddenness and discovery. The book draws on multiple early modern discourses for its historical coherence, and on the philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer for its theoretical validity.

Edward Said and the Work of the Critic

Speaking Truth to Power

Author: Paul A. Bové

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 317

View: 749

DIVA distinguished panel of contributors assess and expand Edward Said’s many contributions to the study of colonialism, imperialism and representation that have marked his career-long struggle to end conflict and further the effort to build civilizati/div

Archives of Authority

Empire, Culture, and the Cold War

Author: Andrew N. Rubin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 680

Combining literary, cultural, and political history, and based on extensive archival research, including previously unseen FBI and CIA documents, Archives of Authority argues that cultural politics--specifically America's often covert patronage of the arts--played a highly important role in the transfer of imperial authority from Britain to the United States during a critical period after World War II. Andrew Rubin argues that this transfer reshaped the postwar literary space and he shows how, during this time, new and efficient modes of cultural transmission, replication, and travel--such as radio and rapidly and globally circulated journals--completely transformed the position occupied by the postwar writer and the role of world literature. Rubin demonstrates that the nearly instantaneous translation of texts by George Orwell, Thomas Mann, W. H. Auden, Richard Wright, Mary McCarthy, and Albert Camus, among others, into interrelated journals that were sponsored by organizations such as the CIA's Congress for Cultural Freedom and circulated around the world effectively reshaped writers, critics, and intellectuals into easily recognizable, transnational figures. Their work formed a new canon of world literature that was celebrated in the United States and supposedly represented the best of contemporary thought, while less politically attractive authors were ignored or even demonized. This championing and demonizing of writers occurred in the name of anti-Communism--the new, transatlantic "civilizing mission" through which postwar cultural and literary authority emerged.

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