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The Turbomotive, Staniers Advanced Pacific

Author: Tim Hillier-Graves

Publisher: Locomotive Portfolio

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page:

View: 252

Turbomotive was unique in Britain's railway history, and an experimental engine that proved successful but came too late to effect the direction of steam development or deflect the onset of diesel and electric locomotives. It was the brainchild of two of the most influential engineers of the twentieth century - William Stanier of the LMS and Henry Guy of Metropolitan Vickers. They hoped that turbine power, which had already revolutionized ships propulsion and power stations, would do the same for the railways.When Turbomotive appeared in 1935, she became a PR phenomenon at a time when commercial rivalry between the LMS and the LNER was reaching its height. Its launch at Euston in June was accompanied by a great fanfare and much publicity. Such was the interest in this 'revolutionary' idea that the engine would attract attention all her life.Although producing good but not remarkable performances, she remained in service, plying her trade between London and Liverpool for longer than anyone predicted. Most expected a quick rebuild to conventional form, but the coming of war and lack of resources meant that she carried on until 1950 in turbine form.Inevitably, change came when maintenance costs seemed likely to escalate and rebuilding seemed unavoidable. She reappeared in August 1952, part Princess and part Coronation, but her new life was cut short by the disaster at Harrow in October. Although many thought her repairable, she was scrapped to make way for another 'experimental' steam engine.This book presents the compulsive and fascinating story of this remarkable locomotive, drawn from a wide variety of sources, many previously untapped and unpublished, including memories of the designers, the crew who drove her, accountants and hardheaded business men, PR teams, the press, the passengers and many more.

The Turbomotive: Stanier's Advanced Pacific

Author: Tim Hillier-Graves

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 224

View: 292

Turbomotive was unique in Britain's railway history, and an experimental engine that proved successful but came too late to effect the direction of steam development or deflect the onset of diesel and electric locomotives. It was the brainchild of two of the most influential engineers of the twentieth century William Stanier of the LMS and Henry Guy of Metropolitan Vickers. They hoped that turbine power, which had already revolutionized ships propulsion and power stations, would do the same for the railways.When Turbomotive appeared in 1935, she became a PR phenomenon at a time when commercial rivalry between the LMS and the LNER was reaching its height. Its launch at Euston in June was accompanied by a great fanfare and much publicity. Such was the interest in this 'revolutionary' idea that the engine would attract attention all her life.Although producing good but not remarkable performances, she remained in service, plying her trade between London and Liverpool for longer than anyone predicted. Most expected a quick rebuild to conventional form, but the coming of war and lack of resources meant that she carried on until 1950 in turbine form.Inevitably, change came when maintenance costs seemed likely to escalate and rebuilding seemed unavoidable. She reappeared in August 1952, part Princess and part Coronation, but her new life was cut short by the disaster at Harrow in October. Although many thought her repairable, she was scrapped to make way for another 'experimental' steam engine.This book presents the compulsive and fascinating story of this remarkable locomotive, drawn from a wide variety of sources, many previously untapped and unpublished, including memories of the designers, the crew who drove her, accountants and hardheaded business men, PR teams, the press, the passengers and many more.

The Princess Royal Pacifics

Author: Tim Hillier-Graves

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 224

View: 357

When Stanier joined the LMS in 1932, as their CME, he was expected to breathe new life into this ailing giant. Since its formation it had steadily lost ground to its main rival, the LNER. In Doncaster, Nigel Gresley and his team, with an eye to advancing locomotive design at the same time as making the company commercially successful, had quickly begun producing a series of high performance and iconic Pacific engines to pull their high profile express trains. Their impact left the LMS trailing in their wake.Under previous CMEs, the LMS had concentrated on 4-6-0 designs to pull their express services, but many felt they lacked sufficient power and had little to offer in performance or glamour when compared to their rivals.Stanier, heavily influenced by his mentor, George Churchward, his work on the GWR and the potential of the Pacific design, saw such a class as essential to the success of the LMS. And so the Princess Royal Class came into being, against a background of some opposition and cultural differences. Despite this, they proved their worth and became popular with their crew and managers. Within a few short years, however, their premier position in the company had been taken by a very worthy successor, the Princess Coronation Class.Overshadowed and often overlooked, they tend to be seen as a stepping stone to something better. Yet, in reality they stand up well to the closest scrutiny, and this book tells the story of these engines through the eyes of those who came into contact with them. They also best represent the impact William Stanier had on locomotive design and best describe the way he changed the culture of the LMS to allow it to grow successfully. It is a story of great endeavor and courage that can only be told by revealing and discussing political, social, economic and engineering issues.

LMS Locomotive Design and Development

The Life and Work of Tom Coleman

Author: Tim Hillier-Graves

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 296

View: 651

In 1958 one of Britain`s greatest locomotive designers died without public fanfare or recognition, mourned only by his family. Yet William Stanier, arguably one of our greatest engineers and his leader, said of him that without his Chief Draughtsman all he achieved with the LMS would not have been possible. How could such a man slip from our view and remain anonymous, although his Princess Coronations, Black 5s and 8Fs are regarded as three of the finest classes of locomotive ever built? And today many survive as stars to grace the ever growing preservation movement.In reality, Tom Coleman was an intensely private and modest man who never sought recognition or commendation. His need for privacy may be one reason why his life has remained shrouded in mystery for so long, but finally his story has been slowly pieced together from a wide variety of sources, many previously untapped. So now we can see for ourselves his great contribution to railway history and recognise his singular talents.

The Railway Magazine

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Railroads

Page:

View: 645

Maggs's Railway Curiosities

Author: Colin Maggs

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 288

View: 319

A remarkable compendium of oddities, curiosities and little-known facts about Britain's railways.

The Engineer

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Engineering

Page:

View: 986

Engineering

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Engineering

Page:

View: 249

Railway Gazette International

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Railroads

Page:

View: 617