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The Rise of the Modern Yiddish Theater

Author: Alyssa Quint

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 527

Alyssa Quint focuses on the early years of the modern Yiddish theater, from roughly 1876 to 1883, through the works of one of its best-known and most colorful figures, Avrom Goldfaden. Goldfaden (né Goldenfaden, 1840-1908) was one of the first playwrights to stage a commercially viable Yiddish-language theater, first in Romania and then in Russia. Goldfaden’s work was rapidly disseminated in print and his plays were performed frequently for Jewish audiences. Sholem Aleichem considered him as a forger of a new language that "breathed the European spirit into our old jargon." Quint uses Goldfaden’s theatrical works as a way to understand the social life of Jewish theater in Imperial Russia. Through a study of his libretti, she looks at the experiences of Russian Jewish actors, male and female, to explore connections between culture as artistic production and culture in the sense of broader social structures. Quint explores how Jewish actors who played Goldfaden’s work on stage absorbed the theater into their everyday lives. Goldfaden’s theater gives a rich view into the conduct, ideology, religion, and politics of Jews during an important moment in the history of late Imperial Russia.

Yiddish Theatre

New Approaches

Author: Joel Berkowitz

Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 269

View: 917

This book considers Yiddish theatre from a number of aspects: its historical development, its popular and critical reception, and the practice and consequences of state censorship. Its coverage ranges from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century and extends to locations as diverse as Cracow, London, Moscow, New York, St Petersburg, Vienna, and Warsaw. Yiddish Theatre not only presents a wide-ranging study of the field but also helps illustrate the significance of Yiddish theatre as a vital form of expression in the Jewish world: it has not only provided entertainment for audiences on six continents, but has also highlighted the social, political, religious, and economic concerns that Jews considered of vital interest. Yiddish Theatre is a valuable resource for scholars, university students, and general readers interested both in Yiddish theatre specifically and related fields such as Jewish literature and culture, east European history and culture, and European and American theatre. The book contains an extensive bibliography of sources relating to all aspects of Yiddish theatre. (PRINT ON DEMAND)

Yiddish Theatre in London

Author: David Mazower

Publisher:

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Category: Theater, Yiddish

Page: 96

View: 591

Epic and Folk Plays of the Yiddish Theatre

Author: David S. Lifson

Publisher: Associated University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 224

View: 794

Works by Hershbein, Leivick, Kobrin, Axenfeld-Reznik and Slones are presented with an overview of the seventy-five year history and development of Yiddish theater and a scenario for each play

The Yiddish Theatre and Jacob P. Adler

Author: Lulla Rosenfeld

Publisher: Sure Sellers Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 372

View: 780

Index. Bibliography: p. 363-364.

The Yiddish Theatre in America

Author: David S. Lifson

Publisher: New York : T. Yoseloff

ISBN:

Category: Jewish theater

Page: 659

View: 483

Bibliography: p. 626-647.

Yiddish

Author:

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Category: Jews

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View: 316

Military Chaplains' Review

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View: 668

Educational theatre journal

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View: 231

Jewish Theatre

A Global View

Author: Edna Nahshon

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 305

View: 699

While a frequently used term, Jewish Theatre has become a contested concept that defies precise definition. Is it theatre by Jews? For Jews? About Jews? Though there are no easy answers for these questions, "Jewish Theatre: A Global View," contributes greatly to the conversation by offering an impressive collection of original essays written by an international cadre of noted scholars from Europe, the United States, and Israel. The essays discuss historical and current texts and performance practices, covering a wide gamut of genres and traditions.

The Detroit Yiddish Theater, 1920 to 1937

Author: James Miller

Publisher: Detroit : Wayne State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Jewish theater

Page: 195

View: 224

Between Jerusalem and Athens

Israeli Theatre and the Classical Tradition

Author: Nurit Yaari

Publisher: Classical Presences

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 480

View: 921

How does a theatrical tradition emerge in the fields of dramatic writing and artistic performance? How can a culture in which theatre played no part in the past create a theatrical tradition in the modern world? How do political and social conditions affect the encounter between cultures, and what role do they play in creating a theatre with a distinctive identity? This volume attempts to answer these and other questions in the first in-depth study of the reception of ancient Greek drama in Israeli theatre over the last 70 years. Exploring how engagement with classical culture has shaped the evolution of Israel's theatrical identity, it draws on both dramatic and aesthetic issues - from mise en scene to 'post dramatic' performance - and offers ground-breaking analysis of a wide range of translations and adaptations of Greek drama, as well as new writing inspired by Greek antiquity. The detailed discussion of how the performances of these works were created and staged at key points in the development of Israeli culture not only sheds new light on the reception of ancient Greek drama in an important theatrical and cultural context, but also offers a new and illuminating perspective on artistic responses to the fateful political, social, and cultural events in Israel's recent history.

Theatre survey

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View: 997

Yiddish in America

Socio-linguistic Description and Analysis

Author: Joshua A. Fishman

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Category: Hebrew language

Page: 94

View: 448

The Yiddish Theater in New York and the Immigrant Jewish Community

Theater as Secular Ritual

Author: Rhoda Helfman Kaufman

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Category: Theater, Yiddish

Page: 327

View: 698

Jewish Affairs

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Category: Jews

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View: 632

The Yiddish Queen Lear: AND Woman on the Moon

Author: Julia Pascal

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 120

View: 745

The Yiddish Queen Lear New York in the late 1930s: a once-famous Yiddish actress gives her theatre business over to her three daughters. The Yiddish Queen Lear is a story of love, infedelity, betrayal and exile, which examines the moment when Jewish East European and American cultures mix, on the eve of the Holocaust. Both a free reworking of Shakespeare’s King Lear and a homage to the lost world of Yiddish theatre, The Yiddish Queen Lear is a vibrant, funny and tragic study of the clashes and connections between two very different worlds. "This play is an affecting and electic treat." Evening Standard (The Yiddish Queen Lear) Woman In The Moon Set in the United States, England and Germany, between 1920 and 2001, Woman In The Moon is a dream play inspired by both the legend of Faust and the testimonies of French, Austrian and German survivors from Camp Dora. It explores the connections between the US space programme, the V1 and V2 bombers, and the slave labour in the Third Reich. "Brave, intelligent and desperately moving." The Guardian (Woman In The Moon)

Shakespeare on the American Yiddish Stage

Author: Joel Berkowitz

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 195

The professional Yiddish theatre started in 1876 in Eastern Europe; with the assassination of Tsar Alexander II in 1881, masses of Eastern European Jews began moving westward, and New York—Manhattan’s Bowery and Second Avenue—soon became the world’s center of Yiddish theatre. At first the Yiddish repertoire revolved around comedies, operettas, and melodramas, but by the early 1890s America's Yiddish actors were wild about Shakespeare. In Shakespeare on the American Yiddish Stage, Joel Berkowitz knowledgeably and intelligently constructs the history of this unique theatrical culture. The Jewish King Lear of 1892 was a sensation. The year 1893 saw the beginning of a bevy of Yiddish versions of Hamlet; that year also saw the first Yiddish production of Othello. Romeo and Juliet inspired a wide variety of treatments. The Merchant of Venice was the first Shakespeare play published in Yiddish, and Jacob Adler received rave reviews as Shylock on Broadway in both 1903 and 1905. Berkowitz focuses on these five plays in his five chapters. His introduction provides an orientation to the Yiddish theatre district in New York as well as the larger picture of Shakespearean production and the American theatre scene, and his conclusion summarizes the significance of Shakespeare’s plays in Yiddish culture.

Jewish Quarterly

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Category: Jews

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View: 912

Theatre

An Introduction

Author: Marsh Cassady

Publisher: NTC Business Books

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 416

View: 158

Greek and Roman theatre - Medieval theatre - Renaissance in theatre - Elizabethan England - 17th and 18th century theatre - Romanticism - Melodrama - Realism - Playwrights - Diversity of modern theatre - Dramatic structure - _Dramatic style and genre - Actor, director and designer - Business side of theatre - _Critiquing a theatrical production_______________

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